Next, fill a large pan with the vegetable oil and let that get nice and hot. Remember to be careful when handling hot oi,l it has a tendancy to be mean and pop around when it’s hot. You’ll know the oil is the right temperature if you put a small drop of batter in, and it starts to sizzle and turn brown, now it’s ready to start cooking your special bananas.
In the early days, Wolf tried selling baklava at Oregon dispensaries, which baffled the medical-stoner crowd. “We were catering to the lowest element of pot smokers,” Wolf said. Since then, the audience has changed: sophisticated consumers are known today as “cannasseurs.” They appreciate savory foods, not only because savories avoid cliché—“everybody infuses desserts,” Wolf said—but also because many medical-marijuana users are diabetic, or avoiding sugar for other reasons. Wolf recommends having a bottle of infused salad dressing or pesto on hand. “Infusing a pesto is so easy,” she said. “You can make a bunch and toss it with noodles, and you’ve got a delicious meal.”
Thinking about baking? Well canna-flour is exactly what it takes to make your sweet treats that much sweeter and requires so little preparation, you’d be crazy not to keep a batch on hand. You’re going to be needing very finely ground marijuana for this one, so maybe a few runs through the grinder plus a little added man power to make it dust like. Don’t feel bad about beating the crap out of your nuggets, they’re being put to good use.
When choosing a strain to use in your bake, consider the effects each strain offers. Indicas usually offer profound relaxation while sativas are more stimulating. If you want to treat anxiety and pain, you might want an indica. If instead you want to address fatigue, a sativa might be more appropriate. There are as many different strains of these basic categories as there are vendors and the different strains offer different experiences. One way to tell a potent strain is by smell. You want a potent and deep aroma from the strain you choose. You may have to test different strains for  thc edibles and ask other users and vendors what effects each give to find the strains that are right for you.
For those who prefer to avoid smoking or vaporizing cannabis, cannabis infused edibles are a great solution. In fact edibles represent one of the fastest growing product categories among medical and recreational dispensaries nationally. Nearly 5 million edible products were sold in Colorado alone in 2014. For those living in less tolerant states, you can make your own edibles at home with surprising ease. In this guide we will cover how to make edibles, how to determine dosage, and why the high associated with edibles feels so strong.
Hi, Congratulations on making your first batch! The short answer is yes, you need a double boiler. I will tell you that coconut oil on the double boiler is not the simplest method. It does require you to watch the infusion that it does not get too hot or too thick, as moisture will escape during the process, thickening your infusion. Also be certain to not let the water boil off in the bottom vessel. A candy thermometer will definitely come in handy to ensure your infusion temps stay below 180 degrees (I like 140 or so). Personally, I recommend using a crock pot or slow cooker. You don’t have to watch it all the time like you do with a double boiler and you can be sure your temps will not get too high. I go over both these methods in detail in my Cannabis Cooking For Home Cooks course. You should check it out.
Marijuana-infused edibles are an enduring classic in the world of cannabis; especially popular among those who need a smokeless option for consumption. Since PA state law only allows production and sale of cannabis oils at this time, we receive many inquiries about cooking edibles with concentrates. In addition to state law limitations, determining your dosage can also be challenging when baking with cannabis flower, whereas with concentrates it can be measure a lot more accurately.
Take the sugar, syrup, and water and mix them together in a pot. Set it on the stove over a medium heat and stir them together until they ingredients dissolve. The mixture should begin to boil after a bit. Make sure that all of your ingredients have been mixed well! After the mixture begins to boil, slowly add the color and flavoring to the pot. Your mixture should be heated to about 300 degrees. This part is a little tricky because you have add the tincture very quickly. Speed is necessary at this part in the process because the liquid solidifies as soon as it begins to cool. Once you’ve quickly stirred in the tincture, pour the liquid in to your molds and let them set.
Pros: It is impossible for our bodies to feel high off of skin contact with cannabis infused oil so any psychoactivity associated with THC will not be felt by the user. However, every bit of the medicine is available to the body. Human skin absorbs up to 90% of what it comes in contact with (hence reapplication of sunscreen) so the medicine is immediately available and fast acting.
I have made cannabis-infused butter many times with inconsistent results. I always start with a ration of 454g of unsalted butter and 28 grams of cannabis. I boil 6 cups of water or so then add the butter and the ground cannabis (i grind it by hand using a manual grinder) and reduce heat, letting it simmer for 3-5 hours. Strain through a cheese cloth and let cool over night.
No! Not fir vaping. You never vape anything with cooking oil. If you want to vape straight rising…buy a vaporizer like a YOCAN EVOLVE PLUS. IF u want to make ejuice…without nicotine…you need to buy vg…..vegetable glycerine and small bottle if pg. Google it. Any vape supply sells it. U can get a liter of vg or pg for about 10.00. only safe way to vape. Vg and of vaporizes at high temps. If u Vaped oil…..cooking oil….you are basically putting hot oil in your lungs and it will stuck to hair follicals in lungs…would basically clog up your lungs and your lungs could not function or filter normally.
Cut the top 1/2 inch off the garlic heads. Add olive oil to the cut heads and sprinkle with basil. Roast in 420-degree oven for 30-50 minutes. The garlic is done when tender to a fork. Boil the cubed potatoes in salted water until fork tender, drain, and mash lightly. Add butters to potatoes and continue to mash. Add pepper, salt, cream, and cheese and mash until smooth. Squeeze garlic into the mix and whip until smooth.
Nevertheless, the column brought up a hazard of cannabis edibles: eating too much can lead to a terrible experience. Symptoms include hallucinations, panic attacks, and paranoia. What’s more, different individuals’ responses to a given amount of cannabis can vary wildly. They’re affected by tolerance levels, but also by sex, age, genetics, and even what the person has eaten that day. Wolf admitted that this complicates the very idea of responsible dosing. “Tiny people can eat a two-hundred-milligram squib”—a powerful gummy candy—“and they barely feel it. Then there are three-hundred-pound men who eat one of our brownies, which have a five- to ten-milligram THC dose, and it wipes them out.” Since the effects of edibles take a long time to kick in—anywhere from thirty minutes to two hours on average—it’s easy for novice users to overindulge, resulting in horror stories along the lines of those described in a tweet by the comedian Bill Dixon:
Eating your weed is an awesome way to medicate. There’s no gross after taste, no smell, and you can get really high. These Oreo cookie snacks are simple to make and you only need a few things. Being creative as a stoner not only applies to fine arts but to making food as well. Creative stoney masterpieces out of food is a quality that most people don’t possess. Stoners everywhere love to create their own concoctions too! If you ever have any recipes to submit, email them to [email protected]
Our products have intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of cannabis infused products. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.
This cookbook may be written by a humorous pseydonym, but the recipes inside are no joke! The Marijuana Chef is back with a full color edition of the much loved stoner cookbook. This book has been a best seller for over 10 years, with easy to follow recipes that make marijuana cooking easily accessible to anyone, regardless of skill level and experience.
I can speculate that maybe what you are seeing is small plant matter particulates that are settling, because in theory the heat should have emulsified the oils together. If this is the case you could use a fine strainer, or just give it a stir and cook with it all. If I were to infuse oil, I would infuse with buds or trim using the method at this page
What could be better then enjoying your summer nights with this dish? For those of you who love fish dishes in the summer, this recipe will be for you! This amazing dish is easy to prepare and will give you an amazing medicated salmon that your friends will absolutely adore. The following recipe will make four servings so if you plan on making it for more or less, be sure to adjust the ingredients accordingly.
A slow cooker is my favorite way, but you could also infuse on the stovetop in a double boiler (it just takes more babysitting). If you are going to buy a slow cooker temp variables are good to have for sure. I like the Hamilton Beach Stay and Go slow cooker because it clamps closed so you don’t get any kitchen odor while cooking. An Instant Pot on the slow cooker setting is also great and is versatile for other things (does the work of 8 or 9 different appliances) and also no odor while cooking.
Brownies are by far the most popular weed edible. In some places, you can’t buy weed brownies but they are incredibly easy to make. On our site here: https://www.ncsm.nl/english/information-for-patients/make-weed-brownies we have given you one easy gourmet recipe and a super-easy recipe for people who don’t cook.  The basic method for cooking pot brownies is to mix your decarboxylated canna butter with your eggs, water, pecans, chocolate chips, and brownie mix recipe, put it in your greased baking pan, and bake for 30 mins. For those who need a simpler approach, simply mix your store-bought brownie mix with your canna butter and cook for 30 mins. This produces a harder brownie that more resistant to spoiling because it doesn’t have eggs, nuts, or milk in it.
This 3-year-old cookbook from two classically trained chefs — the pair have degrees from the Culinary Institute of America, Le Cordon Bleu and Johnson and Wales between them — is one of the better books about cannabis cooking. It’s both pragmatic and culinary-minded, and avoids the stoner language that can obfuscate the prose of the genre. The concise “cannabis 101” intro section concludes with good recipes for canna-oil, canna-butter and compound butters made with it — a great and nicely cheffy touch. The recipes focus on well-sourced ingredients and give techniques for components in such a way that you could easily use the book for non-pot cooking. I’d switch out the cannabutter for regular butter and make the triple-chocolate espresso cookies on a regular rotation, and the matcha sugar cookies too.
Then, take the tahini, garlic, lemon juice, beans, and cumin to a food processor and grind everything in to a paste. Then, slowly add in your oil, blending the mixture occasionally. Once you’ve added your satisfactory amount of THC oil, you can top the hummus with salt and pepper to taste if you’d like. This delicious and healthy snack is great for pita dipping, chips, or to take the place of mayonnaise in sandwiches. You’ll get a much more intense flavor without the added fat. Enjoy your hummus!
Hi Jimmy, I first want to tell you that you are doing nothing wrong. If what you are doing works for you then that’s great. After telling me where you live and how you make your medicine proves to me that all the gadgets and gizmos out there to “properly” infuse your edibles are really unnecessary. The short answer to your question is, yes you can gain a bit of THC by decarboxylating your cannabis first. However, because you bake your cookies, there is some decarbing going on during that process too. But decarbing, before you cook with it, won’t hurt. My method is to place the cannabis in an oven safe baking dish, cover and put in the oven for 20 minutes at 240 degrees. That’s it. To answer your 2nd question, Yes, using your niece’s oven where you have control over your temps will help ensure proper decarboxylation and cooking of your “beetles.”
I have a medical cannabis syringe 1 ml of pure concentrated Indicol B Pure Oil that I want to infuse into no cook fudge. CANNABINOID POTENCY: THC-A: 7.90mg (0.79%), THC: 811.90mg (81.19%), About 82% THC. Have been searching internet and there are no recipes using this type of oil. (initial use was to vape in concentrated cartridge) I am new to this and have a few questions that I can not find answers to. 1) This oil does not have to be heated to “decarb” because the oil has all the THC has all been delivered? 2) For dosing I would like to have the average 10-15 mg thc dose per piece. I have no idea how to divide 1 ml into 15 mg doses or how much to use of this syringe. The online calculators all use cannabutter and leaf ratios. Figured the pure oil would be easier. The more I look the more links I go to and the more confused I get. 3) Stirring this oil in thoroughly will incorporate it evenly and on average each piece will have the same amount of THC?
This book, based on the Munchies and Viceland television series “Bong Appétit,” was published in October by Ten Speed Press. (This is in itself notable, as Ten Speed is one of the best cookbook publishers around, and continues the legitimate trajectory of the cannabis cooking genre.) The book has a comprehensive introduction that includes topics such as dosing, techniques, methods of decarboxylation and infusion, cannabis pairing tips, questions to ask your dispensary, tips on equipment and more. The recipes are sourced from the Munchies test kitchen and from many well-known chefs, whose recipes are recalibrated to add cannabis. Thus: Korean fried chicken from Deuki Hong of San Francisco’s Sunday Bird; fried soft-shell crab with shishito pepper mole from Daniela Soto-Innes of Cosme and Atla; and (my favorite) Joan Nathan’s preserved lemons. The Munchies test kitchen also has some fun ones, including herb focaccia with, well, herb; and confit octopus, in which a whole octopus is poached in cannabis-infused olive oil. If that sounds too aspirational, there are instructions for making an apple bong — a hollowed-out apple filled with weed-infused mezcal — at the end of the drinks chapter.

Wolf’s own child-rearing was complicated by health issues. One day in the early eighties, not long after she’d had her first baby, she was at Barneys, shopping with a friend, when she began to feel dizzy. She woke up hours later, at home. “I couldn’t remember anything.” (She’d passed out on the floor of the tie department, and the friend had taken her home in a cab.) Terrified, she saw a doctor, who determined that she’d had a seizure. She was given a diagnosis of epilepsy, and began taking the anti-convulsant Tegretol. It controlled the seizures, but left her with unpleasant side effects: nausea, headaches, exhaustion. Trying to get pregnant for a second time, she went off the drug periodically, which led to seven or eight seizures a week.
Part of weed culture since the 1960s, weed butter can be made in a variety of ways. The process begins with some version of decarboxylation—or activating the THC. (Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is the psychoactive chemical compound of cannabis—what gets you stoned and what separates marijuana from hemp.) Decarboxylation can be done a multitude of ways, but typically involves cooking the weed at a low temperature for a prolonged period of time in butter or oil. Keep in mind, however, like any other dish you’re making, too much time in the oven or too much heat will torch the ingredients—rendering the THC ineffective.
Unless you are working with a cannabis concentrate (like CO2 oil) that is labeled ‘activated’, you will need decarboxylate your starting material to maximize the effect of your edibles. To do so, we recommend preheating your over to approximately 220-225°F. It helps to use an oven thermometer to check the accuracy of your oven; ours ran nearly 20 degrees hotter than it was set! The specific temperature will dictate how long it takes for your starting material to decarboxylate. As you can see on the chart below, it will likely take between 45 and 60 minutes to fully decarb your material at this temperature. If using a different temperature, be sure to adjust your oven time accordingly!
I’ve smoked for 50 years and I have discovered that including the seeds and stems leads to bad taste and headaches. I would presume that including them in any oil concoction would have the same bad side affects. For myself, I will carefully manicure any weed before I use it in any way. A little great stuff (buds without seeds) is better than a bunch of nasty tasting all-inclusive smoke. IMHO
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