Using a large mixing bowl or an electric mixer you want to sift in the baking powder, baking soda, salt, cocoa, sugar, and canna-flour and mix them well. In another mixing bowl begin adding the wet ingredients, eggs, vanilla, buttermilk, and vegetable oil and mix on low speed in an electric mixer or whisk together briskly by hand. Next slowly pour the wet ingredients into the dry ones while simultaneously mixing everything together. Once you have your mix, stir in the coffee with a rubber spatula as not to “over mix” your batter.
No matter which one you buy, the first 30 or so pages will be the same, offering a beginner’s guide to weed, a dosing guide and recipes for oil and butter, the building blocks of almost every edible. Once the cookbooks lay out the basics, they can get into the good stuff: eggs benedict for breakfast, a New York strip for dinner, and plenty of snacks and cocktails in between. And most of the time, these recipes are good enough to prepare without cannabis.
Still, the public’s appetite for shows about weed chefs — just like the public’s appetite for weed — may be outpacing the conservative sensibilities of the people making decisions. Food Network, among other major players, has yet to touch the subject of cooking with the federally illegal drug, so the Rachael Ray of pot cuisine is more likely to come out of an unconventional platform like California startup Prohbtd, which currently produces a cannabis-infused cooking web series called Pot Pie, hosted by the charming Brandin LaShea. “Having a digital platform is the new wave,” says LaShea, who will feature infused dishes on her next season. “I have freedom that I don’t think I’d have at a large network.”
Hi my question is different but j hope you can answer it. I have a slow cooker that I let someone borrow to make butter in. It has been washed. Is it ok to use to cook my regular family meals and potluck foods without worry of left over residue interfering. I would hate to bring something to a potluck or my young children and they have marijuana in it.
Nevertheless, the column brought up a hazard of cannabis edibles: eating too much can lead to a terrible experience. Symptoms include hallucinations, panic attacks, and paranoia. What’s more, different individuals’ responses to a given amount of cannabis can vary wildly. They’re affected by tolerance levels, but also by sex, age, genetics, and even what the person has eaten that day. Wolf admitted that this complicates the very idea of responsible dosing. “Tiny people can eat a two-hundred-milligram squib”—a powerful gummy candy—“and they barely feel it. Then there are three-hundred-pound men who eat one of our brownies, which have a five- to ten-milligram THC dose, and it wipes them out.” Since the effects of edibles take a long time to kick in—anywhere from thirty minutes to two hours on average—it’s easy for novice users to overindulge, resulting in horror stories along the lines of those described in a tweet by the comedian Bill Dixon:

Bake these little cakes in a muffin pan. I don’t know if they make little mini cake pans. But if they do, use those. It just gets kind of complicated if you fill the muffin tin up too high with batter because the outside edge slants. This makes it difficult when stacking the individual cakes to make the full one. Cook them in the over for about 10 minutes at 350. After then 10 minutes, check the cakes with a toothpick and make sure that they’re cooked all the way through.

The predominant compounds found in cannabis are THCA and CBDA. THCA is the major cannabinoid in Cannabis, while CBDA predominates in fiber-type hemps. THCA and CBDA accumulate in the secretory cavity of the glandular trichomes, which largely occur in female flowers and in most aerial parts of the plants. The concentration of these compounds depends on the variety of cannabis and its growth, harvesting and storage conditions. When locked in their acidic forms, THCA and CBDA are not bioavailable to the body’s cannabinoid receptors. Occurring either naturally within the plant, or upon “decarboxylation” (heating the plant material), these acids are non-enzymatically decarboxylated into their corresponding neutral forms (THC and CBD).
Similarly to preparing other recipes, it is rather important that you pay close attention to the measurements and weights that medical marijuana recipes require. If you are a beginner at preparing weed recipes, be sure to use no more than one ounce of premium quality marijuana per recipe. As you practice making these recipes and have discovered what potency of weed works best for you, you can up the amounts you use to cook.
Because marijuana in food takes longer to metabolize, it will take longer for it to affect you. Expect to feel the effects in about 30 minutes to an hour.[16] Expect the effects to last longer as well compared to smoking. You will not get the same effects due to the differences in how the body absorbs the cannabinoids. Be careful not to overdose by overeating when the effects are not as strong as desired.

How to make Marinated Mushrooms with Marijuana! This is really exciting, and these mushrooms can be served with rice, fish, cut up in soups, or eaten alone and can add some much needed flare to your meal. Being that mushrooms are so diverse, there’s really no limit to what you can do with these and they also would make a great topping on pizza. You can think of these guys as a much more tasty, much more milder form of psychedelic mushrooms. Now that you’re more than eager to have a taste, let’s cook some!
Many chefs have come up with ways to curtail the vegetal tang that so many find overwhelming. Yang says hot foods hide the flavor better than cold, as do foods with high sugar content, like juices. One popular cannabis gourmand, who goes by the moniker JeffThe420Chef, advocates soaking and blanching cannabis to rid it of things like chlorophyll, the green pigment vital for photosynthesis that is also responsible for a lot of the plant’s grassy taste. Sayegh says he has become accustomed to masking the flavor, bringing it into a balance with everything else in the dish so that diners won’t taste it unless he wants them to.
Part of weed culture since the 1960s, weed butter can be made in a variety of ways. The process begins with some version of decarboxylation—or activating the THC. (Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is the psychoactive chemical compound of cannabis—what gets you stoned and what separates marijuana from hemp.) Decarboxylation can be done a multitude of ways, but typically involves cooking the weed at a low temperature for a prolonged period of time in butter or oil. Keep in mind, however, like any other dish you’re making, too much time in the oven or too much heat will torch the ingredients—rendering the THC ineffective.
All in all, they’re not so different—but they’re definitely not the same. Cannabis oil can be used to make marijuana butter, but not all marijuana butter is made from cannabis oil. While nearly anyone with cooking experience can make marijuana-infused oil or butter, making cannabis oil should be left to the chemists, and while weed and cannabis oil are mostly readily available in legal states, pre-made marijuana butter can be hard to find—leaving both legal residents and those getting their bud on the black market in the same boat: making it at home.

First things first: depending on the product you’ve purchased, you’ll be able to see THC-A and/or THC levels of your concentrate on the package label. Most concentrates aren’t decarboxylated (heat activated), and will have a very high THC-A and a low THC labeling . THC-A turns into THC when in contact with heat for a certain amount of time. THC-A loses approximately 13% of its mass when decarboxylated. After you’ve calculated how much of your THC-A corresponds to THC, you would additionally add the small THC amount in the label of your product. Please make sure to calculate your THC correctly. Below is a formula for calculating your total and final THC levels.


A friend lab tested a batch of brownies that had plain kief stirred into the batter as opposed to kief that had been first decarboxylated.  He found the latter to be about 30% more potent.  It’s easy to do, just put your kief or hash in an oven proof dish and heat for about 20 minutes at 250 degrees F.  Remove from oven, cool and you are ready to use for cooking.
States that have legalized recreational use, including Colorado and California, have reported in recent years an uptick in marijuana-related emergency room visits, because inexperienced users often over indulge. In Colorado, for example, the state recommended dosage is 10 milligrams of THC. But for Schaefer, an experienced user, “that is way too potent for me.” 
Cooking with premade concentrates is also an art that takes a little practice to get right. Cooking with kief is fun and easy. Its fine texture dissolves almost instantly in liquids and fats, sometimes even at room temperature. Hash, however, will take a little preparation, and this also depends on its consistency. Dry hash can be put in a food processor to grind it. The sticky variety needs to be heated until it melts.

 Now let it cook on the grill for about 8-10 minutes or until the insides are no longer pink (when checking for pinkness, pick the largest part of the chicken). If you like your grilled chicken smothered in perfectly sinful sauce, use 2 cups of honey BBQ sauce with 2 teaspoons of canna-oil and stir together, it adds a great finishing touch. This is what you would call a gourmet way to get blown, bon appetit!

I say hopefully because lecithin will makes fats bind to the water, which is not what you want in this instance. I never use lecithin when making ordinary infused butter, I don’t see a reason. (more on lecithin here — https://www.cannabischeri.com/food/cooking-basics/lecithin-in-cannabis-cooking/ ) So this is my best guess of how to save it. Without the lecithin in the mix it would be no problem, but not sure how this will affect it. Please let us know!
Pros: Edibles have demonstrated the longest-duration medicinal effect of any method of medication. Also, the total amounts of cannabinoids available through eating are multiplied and could have a much stronger effect than smoking. Coconut oil can be mixed with any foods to keep medication very discrete. Butter can also be used but use unsalted as it will separate. There are hundreds of recipes to meet dietary needs and taste pallets.
Every strain is, of course, unique. Maybe you want a high-CBD strain, a sedating Indica, or a peppy Sativa. All work great. Just make sure to use a strain that has a rich terpene profile to get the most health benefits from your oil. Also, we recommend using strains with lower THC levels that you might use for smoking or vaping — around 10 – 15% is good. No Durban Poison or Dutch Treat, please.
Melissa Parks, a classically trained chef who once worked in research and development for General Mills, is now the executive chef of Las Vegas-based edibles company Vert. She once orchestrated a dinner where she paired tokes of cannabis with dishes that complemented their terpenes. She married a particularly earthy strain called Bio-Diesel (“It had smells of when you drive into a forest over dirt with pine needles”) with a cocoa- and coffee-crusted pork tenderloin in sour cherry beurre blanc.
This cookbook may be written by a humorous pseydonym, but the recipes inside are no joke! The Marijuana Chef is back with a full color edition of the much loved stoner cookbook. This book has been a best seller for over 10 years, with easy to follow recipes that make marijuana cooking easily accessible to anyone, regardless of skill level and experience.
What better stoner treat to make in the summer for when the heat really hits? Popsicles are always a hit, it doesn’t matter what age you and your friends are or what time of year it is for that matter. If you whip these babies out at a backyard gathering in the summer, you’re sure to be a huge hit. Plus, since they’re medicated, people will be able to enjoy your party that much more. And if you don’t feel like sharing, you don’t have to and you can eat this tray of six popsicles all to yourself.
They have struck culinary gold with The Official High Times Cannabis Cookbook, which features foods from many different cultures and for all occasions, from munchies to Thanksgiving dinner. Some of the recipes include Time Warp Tamales, Sativa Shrimp Spring Rolls, Pico de Ganja Nachos and Pineapple Express Upside Down cake. This cookbook is a must have for any home chef who wants to bring cannabis to their table.
The ongoing mission with The Marijuana Cookbook is to collect and print recipes that offer edible alternatives to smoking MMJ, as smoking does not fit into everyone’s lifestyle. The Marijuana Cookbook will include recipes and directions on how to prepare a variety of medibles from soups and salads to main dishes and deserts – and everything in between.
Many different extraction methods are detailed, including cannabutter, vegetable oils, and even nut butters. The thing that makes this cookbook really unique is the dosing chart, which allows you to find exactly the right dose while you are cooking and measuring out your cannabis infused oils. This means no more surprises and doses that you can customize for your particular needs.
If you are starting out with kief or concentrate, you can even further shorten the infusion by mixing the decarbed concentrate with your oil/butter over a double boiler for only a couple of minutes to mix them well. (Even cooler, you can always incorporate the actual flower or concentrate into dishes without infusing, whether that be simply mixing it in with a room temperature butter, sprinkling it on top of lasagna, or adding it to any other food you might be in the mood for!)
First, melt the cannabutter in the microwave. Do this in short increments. If the butter is exposed to too much heat, some of the THC will escape and the butter won’t be as potent. While you’re melting the butter, combine the peanut butter, oats, cinnamon, cocoa, and honey in a larger bowl. Once the butter has completely melted, add it to the bigger bowl and stir everything together.
As cannabis is legalized — although it remains illegal under federal law —and goes mainstream in California and other states, the cookbook industry has churned into high gear with books on what ways to use jazz cabbage beyond the bong. What to look for? A lot depends on your level of expertise — not just in the kitchen but with cannabis itself. If you’ve been making batches of pot brownies and want to expand your repertoire to, say, French macarons, there are cookbooks to help you out. Many books have lengthy introductions that outline the specifics of cooking with cannabis, so find one that fits with what you know — or don’t know.
“It depends on if you’re in a state where you can legally access it, or if you’re in a prohibition state,” says McDonough. Most cookbooks and guides provide a way to evaluate the quality of your cannabis and give it a ballpark THC percentage, which will help the home cook calculate it. “It’s better than nothing, but it’s still not very precise,” she says.
Wolf had given me a rundown of the legal-cannabis industry during our drive, dividing it into three broad categories. First are “the black-market people who’re forging on,” the original patchouli-scented pioneers. Then there are the profiteers: venture capitalists and M.B.A. types who’ve been pouring funds into the legalizing states, a phenomenon called the green rush. “These are people who’ve never smoked pot in their lives,” she said, with disapproval. “They’re just in it for the money.” The majority of pot entrepreneurs fall into the vast third category, driven by the complicated blend of motives—ambition, libertinism, a desire to help sick people—that drives the legalization movement as a whole.
Anytime. Glycerin is tougher than alcohol to get a strong tincture as it is just not as efficient as extracting. I am going to be working on glycerin tincture instructions to update my cooking course after we launch the new topicals course. Depending on your needs and tolerance level, you may do fine, just be aware it likely won’t be as strong as the same tincture made with alcohol.
This first-ever cookbook from High Times magazine—the world’s most trusted name when it comes to getting stoned—is the deliciously definitive guide to cannabis-infused cooking. Easy, accessible recipes and advice demystify the experience of cooking with grass and offer a cornucopia of irie appetizers and entrees, stoner sweets, cannabis cocktails, and high-holiday feasts for any occasion, from Time Warp Tamales and Sativa Shrimp Spring Rolls to Pico de Ganja Nachos and Pineapple Express Upside-Down Cake. Delectable color photos and recipes inspired by stoner celebrities such as Snoop Dogg, Cheech and Chong, and Willie Nelson will spark the interest of experienced cannabis cooks and “budding” chefs, whether they’re looking for the perfect midnight munchie or just to take dinner to a higher level.
Enter JeffThe420Chef. The Los Angeles–based culinary artist, whom The Daily Beast called “the Julia Child of weed,” has been teaching people how to make gourmet meals with cannabis for nearly two years. A longtime cook and marijuana enthusiast, Jeff was inspired to combine the two after a friend’s mother became sick with cancer. She didn’t like to smoke, and couldn’t bear the weed-heavy taste of pot brownies, so Jeff started experimenting with a wide range of recipes that would deliver the benefits of cannabis without the strong taste.
The new book The 420 Gourmet: The Elevated Art of Cannabis Cuisine (out June 28 through Harper Collins) bills itself as a cookbook, but it's also an educational guide to cooking responsibly and efficiently with marijuana. Author JeffThe420Chef—a.k.a. the "Julia Child of weed"—is credited with inventing "light tasting" and "tasteless" canna-butter and canna-oil, as well as the immensely helpful online THC/CBD calculator, and he begins the book with an overview of the various methods that are key to perfecting marijuana-enhanced cuisine. Drawing on his experience cooking for medical marijuana patients and hosting classes for recreational patrons, Jeff explains how to tailor your recipes and dosing for the experience you want, whether it's soothing, non-psychoactive pain relief or flat-on-your-back stupor.

“It depends on if you’re in a state where you can legally access it, or if you’re in a prohibition state,” says McDonough. Most cookbooks and guides provide a way to evaluate the quality of your cannabis and give it a ballpark THC percentage, which will help the home cook calculate it. “It’s better than nothing, but it’s still not very precise,” she says.
Just some of the cannabis culinary techniques you will learn include the correct cannabis oil breakdown, decarboxylation, the benefits of infused butter versus oil, how to store your infusion, and how to make cannabis calculations when cooking. Each week offers appetizers, entrees, and desserts. My 420 Tours provides portioned ingredients and you can take your freshly-made goodies to go!
Depending on how many baked goods you’d like to make, it should be somewhat easy to divide it up accordingly, once you’ve determined how many mgs of THC you have in your batch. The maximum legal amount in recreationally available edibles ranges from 5mg to 20mg per edible, depending on state law, however you’re not bound by these limitations. If you’re not sure about your perfect dose or are inexperienced with edibles, 3-5 mgs would be a good starting point.
Here is another cookbook focusing on sweet confections laced with cannabis, but this time taking a more high-end approach. Sweet Mary Jane was written by Karin Lazarus owner of Sweet Mary Jane bakery in boulder, Colorado. Sweet Mary Jane is one of the first legal cannabis themed bakeries in the united States, and focuses on making the highest quality and best tasking baked treats with medicinal cannabis doses in each bite.
Wow! Thank you for answering so fast Cheri! Appreciate it! You mentioned distributing the thick FECO into a medium to distribute it more evenly. Instead of a sauce pan should I use a pyrex measuring cup above a small pot of boiling water ( a makeshift double boiler) so the oil never gets above boiling temp 212 , so there wont be any chance of destroying potency?
Marijuana oil — AKA canna-oil,  or weed oil to use a more slacker term, is a staple of  many cannabis recipes.  Since THC, the psychoactive component in marijuana, is fat soluble, edible oils make ideal ways to bond it to food.  Likewise marijuana oils are the backbone of many medicated foods.  With these staples stored in your refrigerator or freezer you’re always ready to cook with cannabis.
It depends on the strength of the kief and the tolerance of the person consuming it. Everyone responds drastically differently to cannabis, especially edible cannabis. While 10 mgs THC (the maximum per serving dose allowed in commercial edibles in many states) will be too much for some people, 100 mgs will not be enough for others. If you look at recipes for kief they recommend anywhere from 1/16 of a gram up to a gram (although in most cases that will be way too strong). This why I ever dosing extensively in my online cooking course and even a dosage calculator tool in my free online dosing class (find both at http://www.Cannademy.com ). Dosing is also covered extensively in my new book The Easy Cannabis Cookbook (http://bit.ly/EasyCannabisCookbook) and in less detail on this website (but the basics are also here) in the Marijuana Cooking Tutorials section under the Cooking Basics tab.
During Saturday's class, Charley Wheelock, the chocolate maker who taught Sugar High with Hukill, gave students a brief history of chocolate before diving deep into his passion for infused goodies. He initially got some flak from other chocolate makers when he said he wanted to partner with Serra. But pot culture is here for the long-term, and he’s determined that his kitchen be at the forefront of that movement. 
I messed up a batch. I’m hoping I can save it. I have a MB2 machine, but I didn’t have enough “stuff” (butter and buds) to get the the minimum fill line on there. So I added water to the minimum fill line. I also added some lecithin. Now I have a watery, sludgey mess. Can I put it in the oven at like 220 and evaporate the water, or is the whole batch jacked?
Wolf told me that she, like many other people, sees an industry at a crossroads. Down one path is a future that resembles the wine business, or the farm-to-table movement: boutique pot growers turning out harvests that reflect local climates and customs. Down the other is Big Weed: industrial farms, joints by Marlboro and pot cookies by General Mills, Monsanto patenting genetically modified strains of Purple Kush. Wolf had already observed the corporate interests circling.
Did you cook the butter with water? If so sometimes you will have residual water left after straining. I strain and then heat gently to remove any residual water as it can cause mold if left for long periods, then do a secondary straining to get rid of any other sediment. If you did not add water to the mix, I am not sure where it would be coming from.
Stir together the brown sugar, salt, and melted cannabis butter. Mix together well, at which point you should add in the corn syrup. Continue to stir the mix while slowly adding in the milk. Be sure that all ingredients are getting blended together well. Put this mixture in a pot and place on the stove over medium heat. Let this cook for 10-15 minutes, stirring occasionally. The ingredients should have taken on a firm texture, almost like pizza dough. Take the pan off of the stove and add in the vanilla that you have ready. After adding the vanilla, pour the entire mix in to a pan (Be sure to spray it with cooking spray first so nothing gets helplessly stuck). Let the pan cool off and you’re ready to cut your candies in to whatever shape you want. You can wrap them and give them to friends as special little medicated surprises as well!
Pour 12 doses of cannabis oil into a measuring cup at least 1 cup in size. Once the cannabis oil has been added, top it up with the melted coconut oil until you have a total of 3/4 cup of coconut oil and cannabis oil combined. Whisk the cannabis-coconut oil combination thoroughly to make sure that the cannabis has been evenly distributed into the coconut oil. This is a very important step to ensure that each muffin has equal doses of cannabis. Add the cannabis-coconut oil combination to the wet ingredients (large bowl) and whisk together ingredients, making sure to evenly mix the cannabis-coconut oil into the wet ingredients.

If you prefer to use butter next time instead of oil, the preparation is virtually identical, but you’ll want to start out with a single stick of salted butter and you’ll want to simmer it between 8 to 24 hours if using the slow cook method. Use about a quarter to a half ounce of weed per stick of butter. Butters can be great because it can be more versatile than cooking with oil. You can even add butter to your toast!
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