Many different extraction methods are detailed, including cannabutter, vegetable oils, and even nut butters. The thing that makes this cookbook really unique is the dosing chart, which allows you to find exactly the right dose while you are cooking and measuring out your cannabis infused oils. This means no more surprises and doses that you can customize for your particular needs.
I have an ardent lift (for decarboxalation) I feel as if it over does it? It runs for about 2 hours, and claims that it’s a perfect decarb everytime. 2 hours seems a bit long. Also when I have used trim, I notice the thc % is a little bit too low. Or has at times tested at 0% (using the tcheck device) I am aware that flower bears much stronger results. .should I stick to flower for streng?
I’ve used distillate for cooking and had amazing results. Seeing as how the distillate is already decarbed, I used a double boiler. I used 2 cups of unrefined coconut oil. I dissolved the oil in the double boiler then added the distillate. Simply let it melt in to the oil for about 10 minutes on a low temp. Some of the strongest edibles I have ever made.
Ok, im not dising the people who wrote this book they are good recipes, just don't pay attention to how much of some ingredients to use. I don't think they proof read this book before publishing it. if they did they may have been adjusted. I cook a lot and know off the top of my head you don't use the amounts of baking soda and powder for a basic muffin or pancakes mix as printed, tbls instead of tsp makes a big difference in baking. but nice effort, I think more in-depth explanations on how to make the basic ingredients you need to have, before attempting your culinary creations, would be more beneficial then the messed up recipes in this book.
Edibles can be made using nearly any cannabis product; buds, trim, kief, solventless hash, solvent-based concentrates, or reclaim. we have even used the washed trim from an ice water hash extraction to make edibles. Just note that the quality and potency of your starting material will play a large roll in the strength of your edibles. Thus, edibles made from cured, ground buds will be significantly stronger than the same batch derived from already-been-vaped (ABV) buds. Be mindful of whether your starting material is indica, sativa, or hybrid so you can anticipate the effects it will induce. You can also seek out starting material with a specific cannabinoid profile, i.e. selecting the ratios of THC and CBD that induce the desired effects and are effective in treating your symptoms or ailment. Note that CBD-only edibles will be non-psychoactive, whereas THC-rich edibles are very psychoactive. If you only have access to high-THC starting material and you seek relief without the psychoactivty, we recommend juicing raw cannabis.
For example, if you are planning to prepare 30 cookies with your full gram of wax that has 65% (650 mg) THC, then you’ll simply divide 650mg by 30, yielding 21.7mg (approx.. 22mg) per each cookie—which is a little higher than what some states allow for sale. This is a high amount for inexperienced users. If you’re not entirely sure, it is a good idea to start on the low end and mix in less, or even half of your concentrate until you arrive at a comfortable euphoria.
Cons: Without cannabinoids in the body, tolerance is very low so any exposure to THC smoke will result in a psychoactive rush many users try to avoid, so even though there are just a few parts of THC per CBD, smoking the oil is not recommended for those with very low tolerance. Also, smoking may agitate the throat and lungs, so heavy coughing may result.

For every stoner out there who enjoys a joint there's another two who hate the smoke, but still enjoy the high. In these days of health consciousness, more and more people are giving up smoking. That's where the Cannabis Cooking Companion comes in. There are over 25 delicious recipes for Stoned Starters, Mashed Main Courses and Doped-out Desserts to make meals that are unforgettable and yet somehow hard to recall. There are guides to the science and history of cannabis in the kitchen, plus tips on making your own THC-laced tipples. Infamous names in cannabis culture have also supplied their favourite culinary delights. Sample such recipes as 'Mad-for-it Moroccan Mahjon', 'Holy Cow Hot Chocolate' and 'Lassi Come Home' and then just ...
You deserve better than a limp joint and leftover pad Thai eaten by the light of the fridge. Live a little. Take that ganja and infuse it into butter, oil, milk, and sugar, and fuck around a bit. We're not talking boxed brownie mix; we're talking about a full-fledged gastronomical ball-out—apps, entrees, desserts, even some cocktails—that'll get you high and appease your munchies. Two birds, one stoner.
In many states in the US, a single dose of an edible is 10 mg of either THC or CBD – but some medical cannabis products can contain over 100mg of THC. As always, the stronger concentrations are better to work up to slowly, and to work in collaboration with a cannabis-savvy doctor. After testing out a single dose, most medical cannabis patients are recommended to increase in increments of 5 mg until they achieve the desired effects.
First, as always, preheat your oven to 350 degrees and be sure to put a center rack in the oven. Grease a 10x3in Bundt pan and sprinkle flour all over it. This will prevent the cake from sticking to the inside of the pan once it’s finished. You don’t want the cake to get stuck. It’ll make a mess and you will ruin your cake. It is also important that you leave all of your ingredients sitting out at room temp for at least 40 minutes before you start baking. This includes the eggs, buttermilk, and butter.
For those who go meatless and dairy-free, this quirky cookbook lets you enjoy delicious, cannabis-infused meals and munchies without skipping a beat. Filled with cheeky illustrations and 100 simple recipes spanning all dishes, it’s designed for beginners who may be finding their way around the kitchen while looking for vegan-friendly substitutes. Note: A lot of recipes in this cookbook include soy.

For example, if you are planning to prepare 30 cookies with your full gram of wax that has 65% (650 mg) THC, then you’ll simply divide 650mg by 30, yielding 21.7mg (approx.. 22mg) per each cookie—which is a little higher than what some states allow for sale. This is a high amount for inexperienced users. If you’re not entirely sure, it is a good idea to start on the low end and mix in less, or even half of your concentrate until you arrive at a comfortable euphoria.
Melissa Parks, a classically trained chef who once worked in research and development for General Mills, is now the executive chef of Las Vegas-based edibles company Vert. She once orchestrated a dinner where she paired tokes of cannabis with dishes that complemented their terpenes. She married a particularly earthy strain called Bio-Diesel (“It had smells of when you drive into a forest over dirt with pine needles”) with a cocoa- and coffee-crusted pork tenderloin in sour cherry beurre blanc.
Seven years ago, when Colorado and Washington became the first states to legalize recreational use, Danny Schaefer saw a business opportunity. Schaefer wasn’t interested in growing or distributing cannabis, but he knew visitors would flock to Colorado to openly participate in a drug culture long forced underground. So he founded My 420 Tours, which bills itself as “the original Colorado cannabis tour.” They offer all-inclusive vacations that include pot-friendly hotels, growhouse tours, cannabis massages and sushi and joint rolling classes.
Before you start baking or cooking, you want to calculate the potency of the edibles you plan on making. It is easy to calculate, especially if you know the THC potency of your concentrate (see above to calculate your total THC). A full gram (1000mg) of concentrate with 65% THC is 650 mg of THC in your wax. In a half gram (500mg) with 65% THC you will have 350mg of THC.

Not to be outdone, Netflix pushed out its own marijuana cooking show this summer: Cooking on High, which pits two chefs against each other to create THC-enhanced dishes for a panel of judges, punctuated by cannabis education from loveable pothead comedian Ngaio Bealum. Though critical reception of the fell flat, some of the chefs and personalities featured within seem destined for another, better executed vehicle for stardom. One standout was Andrea Drummer, whose delectable cod cake sandwich made her the winner of the show’s first episode. Drummer trained at Le Cordon Bleu, and oddly enough used to work as a drug prevention counselor before getting into weed cooking about five years ago.


Combine oil and cannabis in your double-boiler or slow cooker, and heat the two together on low or warm for a few hours. This allows for decarboxylation (activation of THC) without scorching (which destroys the active ingredients). Cooking can be done a variety of ways: in a slow cooker on low for 4-6 hours, stirring occasionally; in a double-boiler on low for at least 6 hours (8 is better), stirring occasionally; or in a simple saucepan on low for at least three hours, stirring frequently (a saucepan is most susceptible to scorching). In all cases, a small amount of water can be added to the mixture to help avoid burning. Note: whatever method you choose, temperature of the oil should not exceed 245°F.
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