“When a person eats marijuana product they may not feel anything for a while,” says Dr. Igor Grant, director of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California, San Diego. “And if they were doing it medicinally, they may say, ‘Well, maybe I didn’t have enough,’ and take some more, and then two hours later they’re very, very stoned.”

Hello from the Yukon Territory. I’m a senior citizen and relatively new to this edibles game. I’ve started growing my own, outdoors, without too much fanfare. My plants (about 1/2 doz) make a few buds, that are far from high quality. All I do is dry my plants, grind them up in a food processor till close to the consistency of flour, and make small cookies. I use a half teaspoon for measuring the batter–cute little green ovals. My niece and I call them “beetles”. I’m happy with the buzz I get, and it helps with a few aches and pains I get from my senior age, but reading here and elsewhere, I see there is a lot more to the science behind it all. I’m also realizing that a lot of you may find it perhaps crude that I just cook with the pot the way I do, but I’m happy with the simplicity, and will probably continue with this method. However, do I deduce correctly, that my finished product will be better if I heat my dried and ground pot first in the oven, for 20 minutes at 250 degrees, before I make my beetles?
Great Thread Cannabis Cheri. I have a question. My lady didn’t agree with me cook a batch of butter and oil. So I had to shut down after cook 3 to for hours. I put the oil and butter in mAson jars. They have been out going on 24Hrs and stil haven’t been strained. Can the butter and oil still be used if reheated and strained? Thank you for your help and response.
Most people do not like the green herbal flavor of marijuana shining through their foods. Likewise recipes with lots of spices and flavors going on tend to mask this better than delicate and subtle fare. Use as much or a little more seasoning and flavor adding ingredients (such as onion and garlic) when cooking with cannabis than you would if you were cooking without marijuana.
Wolf gave me a preview of the meal: marijuana-free chicken Marbella and couscous, paired with infused sides and appetizers. The dishes had been set out on a sideboard. Next to each one was a card with the potency level noted in calligraphy: “Stuffed Mushrooms, 5 mg THC each.” (Five milligrams of tetrahydrocannabinol is about the equivalent of a few puffs from a joint.) The secret to cooking with cannabis is fat. THC, the main psychoactive ingredient, bonds to fat molecules when heated. There are high-tech ways of doing this, but Wolf prefers to do it “the old-fashioned way, with good butter and good oil.” Her cookbooks always begin with recipes for what she calls canna-butter and canna-oil.
One more point I should make. I live in the bush, and only have a wood cookstove to do my baking in. The oven temperature is hard to control, and I realize now that that is an important consideration. So in future, I’ll do my baking in town at my niece’s place, in an electric oven where I can control the temperature better. So if you suggest that I should heat my pot first for 20 min (decarbing, I guess), then can you suggest what temp, and for how long I should bake the little critters? Thanks in advance for your help. A very informative site!
My guess is YES! And You have come to the right place, we have listed The Top 10 Stoner Snacks | Do it Yourself at Home. These items are cheap and easy to find and are most likely in your kitchen right now as we speak! So go ahead stoners GET STONED and be creative or simply just use this awesome stoner snack food list to satisfy your munchie needs. Stay Blazed!
Check out ethanol (everclear) extraction methods. Its pretty much a green dragon, then at a low temp (110 or so) evaporate all the alcohol left. I usually keep the tincture heated till oil is pretty much the only thing left. Use that oil in anything and dont bake over 350. It is already activated and decarbed if you decarbed before adding the cannabis to the everclear, so it doesnt need high temperatures again in order to feel the effects. Eating this oil raw works.
THE WHY This seems to be the step where many recipes differ; some call for butter heated in a crock pot while others call for honey heated on a hot plate…who is right? Nearly all of these recipes will ‘work’; however, our goal is NOT to make oil with the most aggregate THC possible, but rather oil with most amount of available THC for your body to absorb. Thus, we are going to select the best inputs for increased systemic bioavailability i.e. the same amount of THC is absorbed more efficiently and thus feels stronger.
“I would say I’m a ten,” Wolf said. She’s had only one edibles disaster. Four years ago, in her rookie phase, she and a friend consumed too much cannabis before a Halloween party. She ended up accosting a partygoer who was dressed as a doctor and asking about a bunch of medical issues. “It was absolutely mortifying,” she said. “I forgot it was a costume party.” She has also had complications with LSD, which she told us about at the table. “Once, when I was tripping, I ate a cinnamon candle,” she said. She thought it was cinnamon toast.
Guacamole! Guacamole! Guacamole! This exciting party dip just gained a lot more celebrity and could be your new best friend. Guacamole is nothing short of fantastic, but with canna-oil it’s nothing short of magical. With so many flavors and textures, it knows how to pop around on your taste buds giving you all the right flavors. The rich green avacado color is a reminder of sweet Mary Jane, and when the buzz kicks in from eating it you’ll be glad you ate so much.

Melissa Parks, a classically trained chef who once worked in research and development for General Mills, is now the executive chef of Las Vegas-based edibles company Vert. She once orchestrated a dinner where she paired tokes of cannabis with dishes that complemented their terpenes. She married a particularly earthy strain called Bio-Diesel (“It had smells of when you drive into a forest over dirt with pine needles”) with a cocoa- and coffee-crusted pork tenderloin in sour cherry beurre blanc.


Seattle chef Ricky Flickenger got his start at a popular cupcake shop and now teaches home cooking classes—which included one on the science of cooking with cannabis, until shifting laws made him retire that particular session. A self-taught chef, Flickenger is used to figuring things out on his own and, like many cooks in the cannabis field, keeps up to date on scientific research. He’s partial to making his butters and oils with a product called kief, a powdery substance made from the glittery, hairlike trichomes that protrude from the cannabis plant. Kief is one of the many cannabis extracts that have found their way into dispensaries alongside traditional buds.
Sayegh is at the forefront of a growing movement to reimagine cannabis in the kitchen, and he’s become known for his many-coursed gourmet THC-infused dinners in a style he describes as “French with Italian and Middle Eastern influence.” But tonight his gingerbread construction—which he’s created for a party benefitting the victims of a warehouse fire in Northern California—is just for show. Sayegh hasn’t lab-tested the village, so he doesn’t know how potent it might be, and he won’t serve imprecisely dosed food. Once upon a time, the menu included cannabis-infused appetizers to appease guests salivating over the off-limits village, but it turns out cocktails are on offer at this party, and mixing cannabis edibles with liquor can make for a “dizzy” experience, he says; he doesn’t serve them together. Guests still partake of his hors d’oeuvres, but they’re made solely from non-mind-expanding ingredients. Navigating such things are all part of the job; complications traditional chefs have never pondered.

I used to be a biter, but my mom cured me of that. Joking aside, I like the taste of weed butter, and I like the taste of food, but the two don’t work for me. I don’t eat sugar or flour, and anything else I cook isn’t going to be enhanced by the taste of weed. And if you make sweets, you can’t eat anymore when you’re high or you’ll make yourself miserable. Why not just eat the butter, then you can eat as many sweets as you like, and just get fat instead of insanely loaded?
“It depends on if you’re in a state where you can legally access it, or if you’re in a prohibition state,” says McDonough. Most cookbooks and guides provide a way to evaluate the quality of your cannabis and give it a ballpark THC percentage, which will help the home cook calculate it. “It’s better than nothing, but it’s still not very precise,” she says.
Those statements have nothing to do with the other. First off hash does have smell and taste, that’s one of the reasons we love it, so not sure where you are getting that. Hash is made from kief that has been pressed, so decarbing happens in the process. If you are going to smoke it, you don’t need to decarb, but for cooking you would. Hope this helps.
Also, if you do plan on straining the milk, you can save what gets taken out of the mix and dry it. Store this mixture to use in edibles later! It’s always nice to have a recipe that reuses ingredients more than once, making sure to get as much benefit as possible from everything. This milk can also be flavored with all kinds of natural flavors! For this season, cinnamon would be absolutely perfect. Of course, try out a bunch and pick your favorite! Enjoy your healthy, delicious hempseed milk!
If you are starting out with kief or concentrate, you can even further shorten the infusion by mixing the decarbed concentrate with your oil/butter over a double boiler for only a couple of minutes to mix them well. (Even cooler, you can always incorporate the actual flower or concentrate into dishes without infusing, whether that be simply mixing it in with a room temperature butter, sprinkling it on top of lasagna, or adding it to any other food you might be in the mood for!)
All of this has produced a new category of cannabis user: people trying it for the first time, to see what the fuss is about, or coming back to it after a decades-long hiatus. Businesspeople see a future in which cannabis is part of a functional, even aspirational life style. Like Julia Child introducing Americans to French cuisine, Wolf serves as both a guide and an ambassador to this world. She was a chef and a food editor for many years, and she stands out as a source of reliable information in a nascent industry without dependable methods for cooking and dosing. Ricardo Baca, the founding editor of the Cannabist, told me, “Laurie represents a voice in the food-and-cannabis space that can be trusted.” Her columns are full of global ingredients and lush food photography meant to attract what she calls “the CB2 and West Elm crowd.” Her books would not seem out of place on the shelf next to the latest tome from the Barefoot Contessa or Yotam Ottolenghi. Evan Senn, the editor of the California-based cannabis magazine Culture, told me that, increasingly, foodies are the target audience for pot. “I love to drink wine, and I’m kind of a snob about it,” she said. “I’m not going to drink Franzia out of a cardboard box. I’m going to buy a nice bottle of Pinot Noir and aerate it and enjoy it. I have the same approach to edibles.”
You must be 21 years of age to attend our experiences. Please make sure to bring your non-expired ID, or State issued License. Temporary IDs cannot be used to validate entry into dispensaries and/or grow facilities. Non-US Citizens must present a valid passport to enter cannabis businesses. These are the rules of the Marijuana Enforcement Division.

I always fully decarboxylate before cooking in the slow cooker as the slow cooker does not get hot enough (https://www.cannabischeri.com/featured/marijuana-decarboxylation/ ). Lower and slower will preserve more cannabinoids and terpenes in theory, so I usually opt for that, but it depends, if I am in a hurry, I will infuse on a higher setting. Both have gotten great results in the finished edibles, but I do not have lab tests to compare, unfortunately.


Decarbing…. it sounds like your oven is not going to cut it for that. The slow cooker, unfortunately, does not get hot enough to properly do the job. I even tried under pressure in my Instant Pot and it only worked so-so. I don’t imagine you have a sous vide machine, most people don’t, but if you did this would work. It is basically a boil in bag but very temperature controlled. The other solution is a bit pricey, but I do like the Ardent decarboxylator as it takes away all the guesswork and gives perfect results every time (enter the coupon code CANNACHERI and $30 bucks off, thanks to the reader who asked for a discount code cause the company gave me one http://bit.ly/cheri-ardent). You can read my review of this gadget at https://www.cannabischeri.com/lifestyle/reviews/cannabis-product-reviews-ardent-decarboxylator-nova/ .
Likewise, if you ever find yourself with a weak batch of food, eat more! If you make a batch of infused butter or oil that is less potent than you’d like, you can always augment it later by heating gently to dissolve some decarboxylated kief or hash into it before using in recipes.  I know marijuana is an expensive ingredient and the natural urge is to use as little as possible.  But think of it this way, you can always eat smaller portions, but if your batch of edibles does not deliver, there’s no way to avoid disappointment.  I won’t say that you “wasted” the weed as you will still be getting medicinal benefits even if you don’t feel high, but if you were expecting/desiring a buzz and you use too little, then you certainly did not put your plant material to its optimal use. Learn more about dosing at this link.
Amazed and thankful you’ve been answering this thread for over a year. I’ve made a few batches of butter in my day and have never decarbed in the oven. Super potent butter achieved but always in the slowcooker or double boiler for around 12 hours stirring every 30 min or so. Clearly this is a time consuming process leading me to making batches only once or 12 a year if that. A friend of mine brought over a batch of cookies she said took her about 1:45 total with the decarb process that were damn good and almost as potent as mine using same quality/amounts of green. I’m baking cookies this week and I want to try decarbing but I’m worried about letting go of my tried and true method. Would decarbing at 215 and infusing in the slow cooker for 8 hours be ok or overkill? I’d love to get better results or the same with less prep time.
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For those who prefer to avoid smoking or vaporizing cannabis, cannabis infused edibles are a great solution. In fact edibles represent one of the fastest growing product categories among medical and recreational dispensaries nationally. Nearly 5 million edible products were sold in Colorado alone in 2014. For those living in less tolerant states, you can make your own edibles at home with surprising ease. In this guide we will cover how to make edibles, how to determine dosage, and why the high associated with edibles feels so strong.
Cannabis-infused oil is probably the most versatile medium and a great place to start, since it can be used for baking desserts, sautéing veggies, frying up your morning eggs, or in your salad dressing. In addition, as is the case with cooking anything at home, you have complete control over its preparation. Does peanut oil hold a special place in your heart? Make cannabis-infused peanut oil!
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