After making several batches of cookies over the past year, in my opinion decarbing your weed before making butter might not be necessary. I noticed a weaker high when eating a decarbed cookie vs and undecarbed cookie. This is all anecdotal but that’s how I feel. The cooking process while making the butter which is a 3 hour long boil and while the cookies are being baked, should be enough. But those cookies jack me up more than any other edible I have ever purchased. I will always make my own.

Oh the holidays are here again! If you’re celebrating this Christmas stoner style, you’re sure to be looking for some goodies to grace your dinner table on Christmas Day. And if you’re not celebrating Christmas, well… These Gingerbread Cannabis Cupcakes are delicious and you don’t really need a reason to make them. If you like gingerbread and you like cannabis, there’s like a 95% chance that you will absolutely love these cupcakes. No holidays required (although it is that time of year).
Hi my question is different but j hope you can answer it. I have a slow cooker that I let someone borrow to make butter in. It has been washed. Is it ok to use to cook my regular family meals and potluck foods without worry of left over residue interfering. I would hate to bring something to a potluck or my young children and they have marijuana in it.
How do you grind your weed? You can use a quality cannabis grinder which you can buy at our store. You can use a food processor or a coffee grinder, although you’d probably want to designate a processor or coffee grinder specifically for that use (unless you don’t mind leaving a little residual flavor, which could be a good thing if you like your morning cup of Joe to taste like Bubba Kush).
 Cut the avacodos into small chunks so that they’re easier to smash. Place them into a large mixing bowl and with a fork or bean smasher, let the smashing begin. (Smash to desired texture) Next cut the tomatoes, yellow onion, cerano chili, and banana peppers into small squares. Finely chop the beautiful cilantro. Add everything in with the avacodos and mix together lightly.
Unlike inhaling cannabis, where cannabinoids enter the body through the lungs, edibles introduce cannabinoids through the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in long-lasting and intensified effects. The intensity level varies depending on the dose, the type of cannabis product used, your own body and even how much other food you’ve eaten, as the effects can be stronger on an empty stomach. Depending on how the body metabolizes the cannabis, it can take between 30 minutes and two full hours before the you notice effects. We recommend not consuming more than your initial dose before the entire two-hour window has passed to ensure you don’t over-medicate. The oral consumption of cannabis is one of the strongest ways to take your medical cannabis and it’s very easy to overdo it, especially when just starting out.
Nick and Mary eventually decided to follow his parents to Portland, where Mary began helping her mother-in-law with the company. She created a Facebook page and designed the logo, coming up with a whisk-and-marijuana-leaf motif. Before long, Mary told me, “I realized we could have a real business.” She and Wolf are an unlikely pair. In contrast to Wolf’s bohemian vibe, Mary exudes wholesomeness. She has short blond hair and rosy cheeks. “I call us Beauty and Obese,” Wolf said. In cooking videos on the Cannabist, they have an “Absolutely Fabulous” dynamic. When Mary says, “We’re going to mix it all into the pot, and it’s going to be delicious,” her mother-in-law exclaims, “Ha-ha. You said ‘pot!’ ” But their skills appear to be well matched. Wolf is the right-brain person, dreaming up recipe ideas, while Mary oversees the left-brain tasks, navigating Oregon’s complicated regulatory requirements.

Ratios and amounts are a personal thing. The recipes on this site use 1/2 ounce per cup of butter, for myself i usually use double that amount. Take my free dosing class to learn more at http://www.Cannademy.com. I am not a fan of the Magical Butter Machine and do not recommend it as I do not recommend finely grinding your plant material and machine forces you to do that.
As to how much bud to use, that depends on how strong you want the oil. The recipes on this site use 1/2 ounce (14 grams) per one cup of oil or butter. That said, when cooking for myself, I use double that amount. I have a high tolerance, but even for those who are “lightweights” making stronger infusions allows you to use less of them in order to get the same dose. Less infusion in the finished recipe means better flavor. If you haven’t already, my free online Dosing class at http://www.Cannademy.com can help you fine tune and adjust your recipes for what you need. If you are unsure of how much you need, please see this article to determine your ideal dose, because everyone is different and not just a little different.
“Oh, yeah. There’s a lot more shit weed than there is high-quality cannabis.”The edible portion of the evening commenced. In the dining room, the conversation turned, inevitably, to the subject of the Times columnist Maureen Dowd, who, in 2014, shortly after the first licensed cannabis retailers opened for business, travelled to Denver and bought a cannabis chocolate bar. Back in her hotel room, she ate part of the bar, and then, when she felt nothing, ate some more. She described what happened next in that week’s column:
Generally speaking, lower cooking temperatures are better. THC is completely degraded at temperatures in excess of 392 degrees F although it starts to break down long before that. Since water boiling never gets above 212 degrees F, I always recommend adding water when making cannabis infusions (see point 2 above).  You will also need to pay attention to cooking temperatures when using the infused butter and oils, or when cooking with marijuana concentrates. Do not use infused marijuana oils for direct sautéing for frying. If you are making something battered, make sure the medicated part is inside the batter. You can cook at oven temperatures up to 375 degrees F, as the food itself will not get that hot.

You sound biter about the taste of weed. If done without any care, yeah it taste like shit but weed can add some awesome flavor if done correctly. I made a lemon meringue pie with cannabis once and the flower really made it something special. No ass taste, just good lemon flavor complemented by the weed. too much weed and it starts to taste funny like you said but just the right amount is great. Too much of a good thing is never good.
How to Make Infused Coconut Oil Making cannabis-infused coconut oil is as simple as steeping quality herb in a quality oil. Machines are available to make cannabis-infused coconut oil, but the infusion process can be done right on a stovetop or hot plate with the help of a double boiler. What You Will Need Double boiler (you can make one if you don’t own one) ¼ to ½ ounce of cannabis 1 cup of coconut oil (organic, expeller-pressed works best for this process) 2-3 feet of cooking twine (a clean unused white shoestring will work in a pinch) Cheesecloth (about an 8” x 10” piece) TIP: A ratio of one quarter ounce of cannabis to one cup of oil is a good starting point. If you want a potent oil, high-quality flower (15%+ THC) works well. However, until you become more comfortable with the process or if you have limited funds, using shake, trim and/or kief work fine (avoid stems and seeds). Cooking Directions Prepare the “herb packet”: Lay the cheese cloth out flat Place the cannabis (breaking up larger pieces) into the middle and distribute evenly over a small area (remember the packet needs to fit into the top pan) Fold in opposite ends to cover the herb Now fold in one of the open ends, tuck and roll Tie the roll of herb tightly with cooking twine (tying a knot in one end and then guiding the twine through it works good) Fill the bottom pan of a double boiler with a few inches of water (allowing enough space so that it does not touch the top pan) and set the shallow pan on top. Place over medium heat to a gentle boil - NOT a rolling boil. Add 1 cup of coconut oil to the top pan. When the coconut oil is almost melted, add about 1 cup of water so that the liquid will cover the herb packet [Note: Coconut oil is nonpolar and water is polar so they will naturally separate when chilled; and THC and CBD are not soluble in water, but are in certain carrier oils. Therefore, the coconut oil acts as the carrier and will “soak” up the cannabinoids, leaving any impurities in the water.] Continue heating the oil and water mixture until all of the coconut oil is melted and then add the herb packet - pressing down gently into the liquid using a metal spoon. Cover and leave to cook for 90 minutes, checking back every half hour or so to flip over the packet and stir it around gently. Also, check the water in the bottom pan to make sure it is not boiling too hard and that the water level is still good - be careful to avoid any escaping steam when removing the top pan. After 90 minutes, the oil and water mixture should be a deep green color. At this point, turn off the heat and remove the herb packet and place in a bowl. Squeeze out any oil that is trapped in the “herb packet” by pressing with a spoon (when it cools down, you can give it another squeeze by hand to get every drop). Add this to the liquid mixture and place in the refrigerator to cool. When the mixture is cooled, the water and oil separate (dirty looking water on the bottom and a nice green color solidified oil containing the good stuff on top). Gently poke 2 or 3 holes through the oil, turn over (holding your hand gently over the oil) and drain the water off. If you are not going to use the oil immediately, store in a container (glass preferred) and label with date, strain and ratio. This will help you determine which strains and in what quantities work best for you. The most important thing to remember is that the effects of consuming cannabis-infused coconut oil (directly or as an ingredient in a cooked dish) are usually slow-acting due to the cannabinoids having to be digested first. As such, it may take up to three (3) hours for you to feel its maximum effects, and those effects could last for awhile. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed or concerned about overdosing, don’t panic -- no one has ever died as a direct result of consuming cannabis. Choosing the Right Strain Your next choice will be determining what strain(s) of cannabis to use. The infusion process does not drastically change the effects or flavors of the variety of cannabis used. Therefore, you will want to use a cannabis strain that delivers the desired effects you want to achieve (indica, sativa, hybrid, high-CBD). Most importantly, you want to be sure that the cannabis you use is free from impurities (such as mold, fungus, bugs, and pesticides). If the cannabis is compromised, the infusion process will not correct it. Cooking Temperatures Cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are all affected differently by heat. A double boiler traps steam between the pans (provided you have a good seal) and remains steady about 212° F. The most volatile terpenes will start to evaporate around 70° F (filling the air with a pungent aroma). A majority of the remaining terpenes will begin to evaporate rapidly around 100° F. The boiling points of flavonoids range between 273.2° and 352.4° F, so the dominant flavors of the strain you use should still be evident in the infused oil. Cannabinoids, specifically THC and CBD, exist in acidic and activated forms. In the plant, these cannabinoids exist almost entirely in the acidic form and are known as THCA and CBDA. When heated, these acidic forms undergo a chemical reaction called decarboxylation that results in THCA converting to THC and CBDA converting to CBD. Complete activation occurs when heated to 220° F for 90 minutes. In theory, the double boiler cooks at 212° F, but many factors can change that number, so you may need to experiment by adding or subtracting a few minutes to achieve your desired effects. Remember, if you are going to use the oil in a recipe that will expose it to further heat, you don’t want it to be fully activated at this stage. Further, coconut oil has an average smoking point of 350° F, and can be very tricky to cook on direct heat. A double boiler cooks by steam so the oil doesn’t burn easily. Overcooking the oil compromises the fats and the taste will be most unappealing. If this happens, all you can do is throw it out, wipe the pan clean, and start over. Health Benefits Cannabis and coconut oil are what some would call the perfect pair. Coupling coconut oil, “a vegan-friendly super food,” with cannabis, “nature’s miracle plant,” makes a lot of sense. Coconut oil is a saturated oil made primarily of medium-chain fatty acids. It is safe to ingest in edible form and is easily digested. It gets its extra punch from lauric acid (C12), which comprises about 50% of the total fatty acids, and has been linked to many health benefits: reducing abdominal obesity, accelerating healing time for wounds, delivering antioxidant properties, lowering lipid components (e.g. cholesterol, triglycerides), preventing bone loss and more. Some people even use coconut oil as a daily detox. Saturated fats have gotten a bad rap for decades. They have been accused of contributing to high cholesterol, heart disease, obesity, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Much confusion and contradictory evidence exists on the subject, even among health care professionals. Professionals, like Dr. Aseem Malhotra, are trying to set the record straight. Dr. Malhotra gained attention after the publication of his peer-reviewed editorial in the 2013 British Medical Journal (BMJ), wherein he seriously challenged the conventional view on saturated fats, and found no significant association between saturated fat and cardiovascular risk. Coconut Oil Uses There are so many things you can do with cannabis infused coconut oil including: Drizzle over hot cooked pastas, grains, cereals and vegetables Great for sauces and dressings Add to hot cooked soups and stews Use as a poultry rub Pan fry foods like scrambled egg, fish, bananas, chicken Put a spoonful in your coffee, tea or hot chocolate Add to smoothies Types of Coconut Oil Organic, virgin (or extra-virgin), raw, unrefined, centrifuged and cold-pressed are all terms you want to look for when selecting a coconut oil for ingesting with no cooking or for use in low-heat cooking. These oils typically deliver a strong coconut flavor. Organic, refined, expeller-pressed and solvent-free are the terms you are looking for when selecting an oil for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, especially when using higher temperatures. These refined oils also tend to have a lighter coconut flavor. Virgin Oil: Unrefined / Centrifuged Oil True virgin oil is a centrifuged coconut oil produced without using heat. It is considered one of the highest quality oils, but also one of the most expensive coconut oils on the market today. Terms like raw, pure and unrefined are associated with virgin oils. Virgin coconut oil has a more distinct coconut flavor. It is considered by most to be extremely mild and smooth, and can be eaten right off a spoon. Producing high-quality virgin oil is timely and expensive. Using a machine (centrifuge) cooled by chilled water, coconut cream is produced from pressing the fresh, white meat of the coconut and then concentrating it to yield more and more oil while the proteins and water soluble constituents are separated out and more of the phytonutrients are preserved. Unlike olive oil and some of the other oils, there are no standards to be met in the coconut oil industry to claim extra-virgin status. It is mostly a buzz word used for marketing. Cold-pressed Oils Cold-pressed coconut oils are also often referred to as raw or unrefined. The extraction method used to produce these oils is very similar to the centrifuged method used to make virgin coconut oils. The cold-pressing method however uses a drying process, which can be accomplished using varying degrees of heat. Therefore, very few cold-pressed oils are truly virgin oils. The method of drying and amount of heat used will determine the quality and taste of the coconut oil. Oils processed at high temperatures may taste of toasted coconut, while those processed at lower temperatures tend to deliver more of a mild, raw coconut flavor. If the oil was poorly processed, it may exhibit burnt or rancid qualities. Refined or RBD Coconut Oils Most coconut oils available on the market today are refined or RBD (refined, bleached and deodorized). If a label doesn’t say it is otherwise, then it is most likely refined. These are typically the least expensive of all coconut oils. Refined coconut oil should deliver a light, delicate flavor. The refining process strips away some of the nutrients, but it doesn’t have to alter other attributes of the coconut oil (such as fatty acid profile, taste, aroma). The methods for producing refined oils varies significantly, and can be accomplished with or without harsh solvents (like lye or hexane). If a product doesn’t say it is solvent free, it is a safe bet it was chemically processed and you should avoid it. Otherwise, RBD oils are fine to use, especially for cooking. Bleaching simply refers to the filtering process to remove impurities and is generally not a chemical process. Organic usually signifies that no harsh chemicals or solvents were used in the production. Expeller-pressed Extraction Method The expeller-pressed extraction method is used to produce RBD oils. During production the coconut meat is dried (most often by sun or smoke) and then pressed in large expeller presses. The resulting coconut oil is crude and must be refined or cleaned to minimize free fatty acids, remove remaining moisture, and minimize bad flavors or aromas. Expeller-pressed coconut oils can be a good option if you do not want to pay the premium for virgin oils. They are also a good option for those who do not like the taste of coconuts, or don’t want a strong coconut flavor for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, certain foods. Just be certain that no chemicals or solvents were used in the process. MCT Oil Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are a form of saturated fatty acid that has numerous health benefits. Coconut oil is one great source of MCTs. Roughly 65% of the fatty acids in coconut oil are medium-chain triglycerides. There are four kinds of MCTs: caproic (C6), caprylic (C8), capric (C10) and lauric (C12) acids. Generally speaking, the shorter the chain (meaning the lower the number of carbons the acid has), the faster the body can turn the fatty acids into ketones (usable energy). MCT oil is not an oil found in nature, but is instead manufactured by machine. The fatty acids are extracted through an industrial process of fractionation and concentrated into MCT oil. The logic is that since MCTs are healthy, the more the better. However, lauric acid (C12) is totally void, or present only in minuscule amounts in MCT oil. This has caused much debate on the matter. One side argues that MCT oils don’t include lauric acid because it is rare and more costly to include, and the other side argues that C12 is a less efficient way to obtain energy and adds nothing extra to the product. MCT oil makers advocate using only C8 and C10 (or 100% of one or the other) because they are the most rapidly metabolized for energy. Choosing between coconut oil and MCT oil, or deciding which one is better, should not be a concern when you understand the differences. On one hand, coconut oil is high in lauric acid which has well-documented health benefits, and MCT oil has very little to offer in that way. On the other hand, MCT oil may help raise energy levels better than coconut oil, but little proof is available to validate this claim. If you do plan to use an MCT oil, be sure the label clearly lists the ingredients and discloses how it was produced. Many MCT oils are chemically altered and contain unhealthy fillers like polyunsaturated fats, and due to their refining process may use harsh solvents and chemicals in manufacturing. Storage and Shelf-Life Be sure to keep the infused oil in a container with a tight lid (insects and critters love it). A glass jar with a wide mouth works well so that you can scoop it out easily. The infused oil should be kept out of direct sunlight. It can be refrigerated, but it is not necessary. It can also be frozen, but freezing it will change the taste - sometimes for the better but sometimes for the worse. Coconut oil is very stable and depending on the kind, can last anywhere from 18 months to several years. Opinions differ on how long cannabis-infused oil can be kept. Most agree that degradation begins after 2-3 months, and sooner after repeated exposure to air (opening and shutting the jar) or overexposure to sunlight or heat. This does not mean it is unusable, but you will definitely start to notice a change in the taste and effectiveness as the cannabinoids begin to degrade.
When people think of brownies, they don’t usually think of them being too healthy. However, that thought is about to change thanks to the addition of hemp seeds in to the traditional brownie recipe. With the recent explosion of hemp knowledge and support, more and more people are beginning to incorporate hemp in to their diets, more specifically the seeds. The seeds of the hemp plant are the most helpful part, containing an excellent source of vegan protein, dietary fiber and all essential amino acids, plus the added benefit of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.
Wolf, the younger of two children, grew up in Riverdale, a wealthy neighborhood in the Bronx. Her mother, a teacher, could be “extremely uptight,” she told me. Her father, a dentist, had anger issues. Good food was in short supply, as was good fun. “Looking back, I realize my parents were not at all happy with each other,” she said. She attended Calhoun, at the time an all-girl’s school, in Manhattan. One day, an administrator called to inform her parents that several girls were suspected of having smoked marijuana. Her mother rightly guessed that Laurie was one of them. “I got home to find her crying hysterically,” Wolf said. “She was, like, ‘How did I go wrong? You’re an addict! You let us down!’ ”
Cooking at home with cannabis does not have to be a game of Russian Roulette. It is important, especially if trying a new recipe, to test the octane! Check out how strong your infused oil is on yourself. Just take a small teaspoon of your newly infused fat as a personal dose. Wait an hour. This will help you determine how strong the batch is. Then use accordingly.

If you’ve ever used a tincture and tried to mix it in a drink, you’ve probably noticed it doesn’t mix all that well. Why? Pot isn’t water soluble; it’s oil soluble. So you’ll do best using a high-fat oil, like coconut oil or canola. You can even use olive oil. Keep in mind, however, that canola has a higher boiling/smoking point than coconut and olive oils.
Strain the butter and refrigerate. Choose a storage container for your butter. Cover the top with cheesecloth[8] for straining. Use a rubber band around the top of the container to hold the cheesecloth in place. Pour the mixture through the cheesecloth into the container. Squeeze the solids to get as much butter out as possible. Store in an airtight container in your fridge for later use.
If you’ve ever used a tincture and tried to mix it in a drink, you’ve probably noticed it doesn’t mix all that well. Why? Pot isn’t water soluble; it’s oil soluble. So you’ll do best using a high-fat oil, like coconut oil or canola. You can even use olive oil. Keep in mind, however, that canola has a higher boiling/smoking point than coconut and olive oils.
Nevertheless, the column brought up a hazard of cannabis edibles: eating too much can lead to a terrible experience. Symptoms include hallucinations, panic attacks, and paranoia. What’s more, different individuals’ responses to a given amount of cannabis can vary wildly. They’re affected by tolerance levels, but also by sex, age, genetics, and even what the person has eaten that day. Wolf admitted that this complicates the very idea of responsible dosing. “Tiny people can eat a two-hundred-milligram squib”—a powerful gummy candy—“and they barely feel it. Then there are three-hundred-pound men who eat one of our brownies, which have a five- to ten-milligram THC dose, and it wipes them out.” Since the effects of edibles take a long time to kick in—anywhere from thirty minutes to two hours on average—it’s easy for novice users to overindulge, resulting in horror stories along the lines of those described in a tweet by the comedian Bill Dixon:
Wolf advocates a cautious approach. “Our philosophy is ‘less is more,’ ” she said. “Figure out the littlest bit of cannabis that will get you to a good place and start with that.” The Trichome guys agreed. “Cannabis education is the most necessary thing in this industry, across the board!” Montrose said, piously. He talked about having a “number,” as for a Sleep Number bed. “I’m an eighty-milligram dude. I know my edible tolerance, because I’ve dialled it in so precisely,” he said. “I know that if I want a really pleasant experience, a relaxing, pain-relieving experience, eighty milligrams is perfect for me. If I want to go to sleep? One hundred and twenty milligrams. If I want to keep working? Fifteen milligrams.”
How do you grind your weed? You can use a quality cannabis grinder which you can buy at our store. You can use a food processor or a coffee grinder, although you’d probably want to designate a processor or coffee grinder specifically for that use (unless you don’t mind leaving a little residual flavor, which could be a good thing if you like your morning cup of Joe to taste like Bubba Kush).
How to Make Infused Coconut Oil Making cannabis-infused coconut oil is as simple as steeping quality herb in a quality oil. Machines are available to make cannabis-infused coconut oil, but the infusion process can be done right on a stovetop or hot plate with the help of a double boiler. What You Will Need Double boiler (you can make one if you don’t own one) ¼ to ½ ounce of cannabis 1 cup of coconut oil (organic, expeller-pressed works best for this process) 2-3 feet of cooking twine (a clean unused white shoestring will work in a pinch) Cheesecloth (about an 8” x 10” piece) TIP: A ratio of one quarter ounce of cannabis to one cup of oil is a good starting point. If you want a potent oil, high-quality flower (15%+ THC) works well. However, until you become more comfortable with the process or if you have limited funds, using shake, trim and/or kief work fine (avoid stems and seeds). Cooking Directions Prepare the “herb packet”: Lay the cheese cloth out flat Place the cannabis (breaking up larger pieces) into the middle and distribute evenly over a small area (remember the packet needs to fit into the top pan) Fold in opposite ends to cover the herb Now fold in one of the open ends, tuck and roll Tie the roll of herb tightly with cooking twine (tying a knot in one end and then guiding the twine through it works good) Fill the bottom pan of a double boiler with a few inches of water (allowing enough space so that it does not touch the top pan) and set the shallow pan on top. Place over medium heat to a gentle boil - NOT a rolling boil. Add 1 cup of coconut oil to the top pan. When the coconut oil is almost melted, add about 1 cup of water so that the liquid will cover the herb packet [Note: Coconut oil is nonpolar and water is polar so they will naturally separate when chilled; and THC and CBD are not soluble in water, but are in certain carrier oils. Therefore, the coconut oil acts as the carrier and will “soak” up the cannabinoids, leaving any impurities in the water.] Continue heating the oil and water mixture until all of the coconut oil is melted and then add the herb packet - pressing down gently into the liquid using a metal spoon. Cover and leave to cook for 90 minutes, checking back every half hour or so to flip over the packet and stir it around gently. Also, check the water in the bottom pan to make sure it is not boiling too hard and that the water level is still good - be careful to avoid any escaping steam when removing the top pan. After 90 minutes, the oil and water mixture should be a deep green color. At this point, turn off the heat and remove the herb packet and place in a bowl. Squeeze out any oil that is trapped in the “herb packet” by pressing with a spoon (when it cools down, you can give it another squeeze by hand to get every drop). Add this to the liquid mixture and place in the refrigerator to cool. When the mixture is cooled, the water and oil separate (dirty looking water on the bottom and a nice green color solidified oil containing the good stuff on top). Gently poke 2 or 3 holes through the oil, turn over (holding your hand gently over the oil) and drain the water off. If you are not going to use the oil immediately, store in a container (glass preferred) and label with date, strain and ratio. This will help you determine which strains and in what quantities work best for you. The most important thing to remember is that the effects of consuming cannabis-infused coconut oil (directly or as an ingredient in a cooked dish) are usually slow-acting due to the cannabinoids having to be digested first. As such, it may take up to three (3) hours for you to feel its maximum effects, and those effects could last for awhile. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed or concerned about overdosing, don’t panic -- no one has ever died as a direct result of consuming cannabis. Choosing the Right Strain Your next choice will be determining what strain(s) of cannabis to use. The infusion process does not drastically change the effects or flavors of the variety of cannabis used. Therefore, you will want to use a cannabis strain that delivers the desired effects you want to achieve (indica, sativa, hybrid, high-CBD). Most importantly, you want to be sure that the cannabis you use is free from impurities (such as mold, fungus, bugs, and pesticides). If the cannabis is compromised, the infusion process will not correct it. Cooking Temperatures Cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are all affected differently by heat. A double boiler traps steam between the pans (provided you have a good seal) and remains steady about 212° F. The most volatile terpenes will start to evaporate around 70° F (filling the air with a pungent aroma). A majority of the remaining terpenes will begin to evaporate rapidly around 100° F. The boiling points of flavonoids range between 273.2° and 352.4° F, so the dominant flavors of the strain you use should still be evident in the infused oil. Cannabinoids, specifically THC and CBD, exist in acidic and activated forms. In the plant, these cannabinoids exist almost entirely in the acidic form and are known as THCA and CBDA. When heated, these acidic forms undergo a chemical reaction called decarboxylation that results in THCA converting to THC and CBDA converting to CBD. Complete activation occurs when heated to 220° F for 90 minutes. In theory, the double boiler cooks at 212° F, but many factors can change that number, so you may need to experiment by adding or subtracting a few minutes to achieve your desired effects. Remember, if you are going to use the oil in a recipe that will expose it to further heat, you don’t want it to be fully activated at this stage. Further, coconut oil has an average smoking point of 350° F, and can be very tricky to cook on direct heat. A double boiler cooks by steam so the oil doesn’t burn easily. Overcooking the oil compromises the fats and the taste will be most unappealing. If this happens, all you can do is throw it out, wipe the pan clean, and start over. Health Benefits Cannabis and coconut oil are what some would call the perfect pair. Coupling coconut oil, “a vegan-friendly super food,” with cannabis, “nature’s miracle plant,” makes a lot of sense. Coconut oil is a saturated oil made primarily of medium-chain fatty acids. It is safe to ingest in edible form and is easily digested. It gets its extra punch from lauric acid (C12), which comprises about 50% of the total fatty acids, and has been linked to many health benefits: reducing abdominal obesity, accelerating healing time for wounds, delivering antioxidant properties, lowering lipid components (e.g. cholesterol, triglycerides), preventing bone loss and more. Some people even use coconut oil as a daily detox. Saturated fats have gotten a bad rap for decades. They have been accused of contributing to high cholesterol, heart disease, obesity, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Much confusion and contradictory evidence exists on the subject, even among health care professionals. Professionals, like Dr. Aseem Malhotra, are trying to set the record straight. Dr. Malhotra gained attention after the publication of his peer-reviewed editorial in the 2013 British Medical Journal (BMJ), wherein he seriously challenged the conventional view on saturated fats, and found no significant association between saturated fat and cardiovascular risk. Coconut Oil Uses There are so many things you can do with cannabis infused coconut oil including: Drizzle over hot cooked pastas, grains, cereals and vegetables Great for sauces and dressings Add to hot cooked soups and stews Use as a poultry rub Pan fry foods like scrambled egg, fish, bananas, chicken Put a spoonful in your coffee, tea or hot chocolate Add to smoothies Types of Coconut Oil Organic, virgin (or extra-virgin), raw, unrefined, centrifuged and cold-pressed are all terms you want to look for when selecting a coconut oil for ingesting with no cooking or for use in low-heat cooking. These oils typically deliver a strong coconut flavor. Organic, refined, expeller-pressed and solvent-free are the terms you are looking for when selecting an oil for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, especially when using higher temperatures. These refined oils also tend to have a lighter coconut flavor. Virgin Oil: Unrefined / Centrifuged Oil True virgin oil is a centrifuged coconut oil produced without using heat. It is considered one of the highest quality oils, but also one of the most expensive coconut oils on the market today. Terms like raw, pure and unrefined are associated with virgin oils. Virgin coconut oil has a more distinct coconut flavor. It is considered by most to be extremely mild and smooth, and can be eaten right off a spoon. Producing high-quality virgin oil is timely and expensive. Using a machine (centrifuge) cooled by chilled water, coconut cream is produced from pressing the fresh, white meat of the coconut and then concentrating it to yield more and more oil while the proteins and water soluble constituents are separated out and more of the phytonutrients are preserved. Unlike olive oil and some of the other oils, there are no standards to be met in the coconut oil industry to claim extra-virgin status. It is mostly a buzz word used for marketing. Cold-pressed Oils Cold-pressed coconut oils are also often referred to as raw or unrefined. The extraction method used to produce these oils is very similar to the centrifuged method used to make virgin coconut oils. The cold-pressing method however uses a drying process, which can be accomplished using varying degrees of heat. Therefore, very few cold-pressed oils are truly virgin oils. The method of drying and amount of heat used will determine the quality and taste of the coconut oil. Oils processed at high temperatures may taste of toasted coconut, while those processed at lower temperatures tend to deliver more of a mild, raw coconut flavor. If the oil was poorly processed, it may exhibit burnt or rancid qualities. Refined or RBD Coconut Oils Most coconut oils available on the market today are refined or RBD (refined, bleached and deodorized). If a label doesn’t say it is otherwise, then it is most likely refined. These are typically the least expensive of all coconut oils. Refined coconut oil should deliver a light, delicate flavor. The refining process strips away some of the nutrients, but it doesn’t have to alter other attributes of the coconut oil (such as fatty acid profile, taste, aroma). The methods for producing refined oils varies significantly, and can be accomplished with or without harsh solvents (like lye or hexane). If a product doesn’t say it is solvent free, it is a safe bet it was chemically processed and you should avoid it. Otherwise, RBD oils are fine to use, especially for cooking. Bleaching simply refers to the filtering process to remove impurities and is generally not a chemical process. Organic usually signifies that no harsh chemicals or solvents were used in the production. Expeller-pressed Extraction Method The expeller-pressed extraction method is used to produce RBD oils. During production the coconut meat is dried (most often by sun or smoke) and then pressed in large expeller presses. The resulting coconut oil is crude and must be refined or cleaned to minimize free fatty acids, remove remaining moisture, and minimize bad flavors or aromas. Expeller-pressed coconut oils can be a good option if you do not want to pay the premium for virgin oils. They are also a good option for those who do not like the taste of coconuts, or don’t want a strong coconut flavor for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, certain foods. Just be certain that no chemicals or solvents were used in the process. MCT Oil Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are a form of saturated fatty acid that has numerous health benefits. Coconut oil is one great source of MCTs. Roughly 65% of the fatty acids in coconut oil are medium-chain triglycerides. There are four kinds of MCTs: caproic (C6), caprylic (C8), capric (C10) and lauric (C12) acids. Generally speaking, the shorter the chain (meaning the lower the number of carbons the acid has), the faster the body can turn the fatty acids into ketones (usable energy). MCT oil is not an oil found in nature, but is instead manufactured by machine. The fatty acids are extracted through an industrial process of fractionation and concentrated into MCT oil. The logic is that since MCTs are healthy, the more the better. However, lauric acid (C12) is totally void, or present only in minuscule amounts in MCT oil. This has caused much debate on the matter. One side argues that MCT oils don’t include lauric acid because it is rare and more costly to include, and the other side argues that C12 is a less efficient way to obtain energy and adds nothing extra to the product. MCT oil makers advocate using only C8 and C10 (or 100% of one or the other) because they are the most rapidly metabolized for energy. Choosing between coconut oil and MCT oil, or deciding which one is better, should not be a concern when you understand the differences. On one hand, coconut oil is high in lauric acid which has well-documented health benefits, and MCT oil has very little to offer in that way. On the other hand, MCT oil may help raise energy levels better than coconut oil, but little proof is available to validate this claim. If you do plan to use an MCT oil, be sure the label clearly lists the ingredients and discloses how it was produced. Many MCT oils are chemically altered and contain unhealthy fillers like polyunsaturated fats, and due to their refining process may use harsh solvents and chemicals in manufacturing. Storage and Shelf-Life Be sure to keep the infused oil in a container with a tight lid (insects and critters love it). A glass jar with a wide mouth works well so that you can scoop it out easily. The infused oil should be kept out of direct sunlight. It can be refrigerated, but it is not necessary. It can also be frozen, but freezing it will change the taste - sometimes for the better but sometimes for the worse. Coconut oil is very stable and depending on the kind, can last anywhere from 18 months to several years. Opinions differ on how long cannabis-infused oil can be kept. Most agree that degradation begins after 2-3 months, and sooner after repeated exposure to air (opening and shutting the jar) or overexposure to sunlight or heat. This does not mean it is unusable, but you will definitely start to notice a change in the taste and effectiveness as the cannabinoids begin to degrade.
After 24 hours, turn the crockpot off. Let it sit for a while and cool off. I waited about 20 minutes. When the glycerin has cooled, put on your gloves and put the cheesecloth over the mouth of the mason jar. I took the circle part of the jar and screwed it back on over the cloth to keep in in place. I also folded the cloth over itself about four or five times to ensure that I strained out all of the leftover marijuana powder.

Topicals don’t make it into your bloodstream, just into your cannabinoid receptors, and can be great for localized pain. Under the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (ACMPR) in Canada, licensed producers of medical cannabis can’t currently manufacture or distribute topicals – but with the distribution of oils, it’s possible for you to make your own (with carrier oils and other bases for creams.)


Terpenes are aroma and flavor compounds found in all kinds of plant foods, such as cinnamon, oregano, and lemons. Cannabis shares certain terpenes with mangoes, black pepper, and rosemary, and different strains of cannabis have different terpenes. It’s not unusual for cannabis sold in dispensaries to come with tasting notes, like a glass of wine, and a company in Amsterdam even has a detailed “flavor wheel” of available strains with flavors as specific as “Tabasco” and “bread fruit.” Sayegh and others believe terpenes, like cannabinoids, shape the high and have therapeutic benefits—from calming to euphoric—and will pick and choose strains based on that. Some studies have supported this direct connection between flavor and effect, but, as with many aspects of cannabis, research has been limited by the plant’s legal status.
If you prefer to use butter next time instead of oil, the preparation is virtually identical, but you’ll want to start out with a single stick of salted butter and you’ll want to simmer it between 8 to 24 hours if using the slow cook method. Use about a quarter to a half ounce of weed per stick of butter. Butters can be great because it can be more versatile than cooking with oil. You can even add butter to your toast!
Pros: Edibles have demonstrated the longest-duration medicinal effect of any method of medication. Also, the total amounts of cannabinoids available through eating are multiplied and could have a much stronger effect than smoking. Coconut oil can be mixed with any foods to keep medication very discrete. Butter can also be used but use unsalted as it will separate. There are hundreds of recipes to meet dietary needs and taste pallets.
Mary Poppins wasn’t just blowing smoke when she sang, “Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.” There’s proof lining the shelves of dispensaries across the country, and the choices in infused edibles have never been better. But for some patients, it’s more complicated than choosing between Dr. Robert’s Chocolate Trip Cookie and Compassion Edibles’ Traditional French Chocolate Tainted Truffles. People with special dietary …

Cons: Without cannabinoids in the body, tolerance is very low so any exposure to THC smoke will result in a psychoactive rush many users try to avoid, so even though there are just a few parts of THC per CBD, smoking the oil is not recommended for those with very low tolerance. Also, smoking may agitate the throat and lungs, so heavy coughing may result.
The number of people who think that sweets are the only kind of edibles you can make with marijuana consistently surprises me. The fact is most any food can be infused with cannabis. In fact, it is usually easier to hide the green herbal flavor that most people don’t like in spicy and/or savory foods. There are lots of terrific cannabis cookbooks on the market to help you expand you cannabis culinary repertoire, including my own Cannabis Gourmet Cookbook and The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. You can also find lots of recipes, both savory and sweet, on this blog.
Laurie & MaryJane’s brownies went on sale in February. They come in packages of five, which sell for twenty to thirty-three dollars, depending on potency. Wolf currently has them in thirty-five dispensaries and has developed new products: an almond-cake bite, a chocolate truffle, and a soon-to-be-launched savory cheese crisp. Ultimately, she hopes to conquer Oregon—and then to try for California. “The dream is to be everywhere it’s legal,” Wolf said, sounding a bit Big Weed herself. “To be the Mrs. Fields of cannabis foods.”
Step 10: After about 5 hours, the butter will solidify and some of the water will turn to ice. Take each container one by one over to the sink, take off the lid, and with one hand supporting the ice block, turn container upside down and release. Some water will come pouring out, and the ice just needs to be scraped away from the main butter block. You should be left with a smooth, round slab of light green butter.
Robyn Griggs Lawrence cares about your well-being. As a former editor of Natural Home magazine, she wrote a number of books on healthy living before making her foray into the culinary cannabis world. Her “Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook,” which has a foreword written by Women Grow co-founder Jane West, gathers wholesome recipes and tips from chefs across the country on making edibles that are vegan, vegetarian, raw and gluten-free. The book includes cameos from Scott Durrah, a co-found of Denver cannabis cooking company Simply Pure, and Catjia Redfern, co-founder of MegaMints, among others.

and it is a gift to us to be savored and enjoyed ! When I make a butter I want people to know there’s weed in it I want it to be green I wanted to be smelly and I wanted to taste like something , I think personally you’re confusing the details of *smoking weed with the details of *eating weed yes chloroform and all that other stuff you mentioned is very bad when it comes to smoking like if you were making a hash or an extract you would definitely want to use a method that results in fewer of these but when it comes to cooking those things are good for you they have tremendous health value and you’re only screwing Yourself by cutting out the flavor and the health benefits. you’re coming across like some kind of a Stoner burn out the way your talking about this stuff .
This first-ever cookbook from High Times magazine—the world's most trusted name when it comes to getting stoned—is the deliciously definitive guide to cannabis-infused cooking. Easy, accessible recipes and advice demystify the experience of cooking with grass and offer a cornucopia of irie appetizers and entrees, stoner sweets, cannabis cocktails, and high-holiday feasts for any occasion, from Time Warp Tamales and Sativa Shrimp Spring Rolls to Pico de Ganja Nachos and Pineapple Express Upside-Down Cake. Delectable color photos and recipes inspired by stoner celebrities such as Snoop Dogg, Cheech and Chong, and Willie Nelson will spark the interest of experienced cannabis cooks and "budding" chefs, whether they're looking for the perfect midnight munchie or just to take dinner to a higher level.
Moriarty’s book visually demonstrates the “secret” process for creating her magical 10x Cannabutter, which replaces the bitter “grass flavor” with a tasty, nutty butter flavor. The smokin’ hot cook book includes 49 easy-to-prepare, delicious dishes that range from her signature dessert, “Blue Sky Lemon Bars”, to her “Dizzy Bird Turkey with Stuffing” – a perfect dish for festive holiday dinners.

No! That would be disastrous. Hash and kief are NOTHING like flour. You can make your regular cookie recipe with the regular amount of flour and simply stir in an appropriate amount of finely ground decarboxylated kief or hash that will give you the dose you are seeking into your batter and bake as usual. But hash and kief are by no means a substitute for flour.
In addition to infusing butter and oil with bud, you can infuse it with kief for a very potent infusion. If you’re not familiar with kief, it’s the sticky bits of resin you see on buds. It has a high concentration of cannabinoids but when cooked, it doesn’t impart the cannabis flavor like using the whole flower. In addition, kief butter needs an even quicker infusion and you don’t need to strain plant matter out of your finished product. Again, because of the high concentration of cannabinoids in kief, this makes a very potent oil so start small with your dosage.
If you haven’t yet discovered the wonder that is cannabis-infused eating, I’m excited for you because you’re in for an adventure. The experience from start to finish is significantly different from the other common inhalation methods. The effects are typically longer, stronger, and slower to set in. For this reason, always start with a low dose and see how an edible affects you — especially if you’re cooking your own as it is impossible to calculate their potency.
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