Ice extracts are a much safer way to obtain highly concentrated THC, rather than the “easier” butane method. Ice hash is clean and earthy, definitely something every stoner should try at some point. It’s not as difficult to make as some people think. Here’s a step by step tutorial on how to make ice hash yourself and get a good yield of some serious fire.
Decarboxylated cannabis can (and has been) infused into a spectrum of household ingredients, from avocado oil to bacon fat, although some may be better conduits than others. In a trial where she infused and tested a number of vehicles, McDonough found that clarified butter and coconut oil produced especially potent solutions. Her hypothesis as to why? Saturated fats like butter and coconut oil are better able to absorb THC than monounsaturated fats like olive oil. “We’ll need to do more study,” she writes, “but in the meantime, all of you cannabis cooks at home can rest assured that using clarified butter or coconut oil for your cannabis infusions will result in a potent and cost-effective infusion.”
A friend lab tested a batch of brownies that had plain kief stirred into the batter as opposed to kief that had been first decarboxylated.  He found the latter to be about 30% more potent.  It’s easy to do, just put your kief or hash in an oven proof dish and heat for about 20 minutes at 250 degrees F.  Remove from oven, cool and you are ready to use for cooking.
Marijuana butter and cannabis-infused oil can be ingested in a variety of ways. Once you’ve created the product, it can be used as a cooking ingredient for any recipe—minding that most baked goods work best with butter. However, one thing to consider is the temperature of the dish you’re preparing—heating the marijuana butter or oil to temperatures exceeding 245 degrees Fahrenheit will burn the THC. For a more simple application, the butter can be used as a spread on toast or even just dosed orally by itself. Some choose cannabis-infused oil as a medicinal ingredient in topical salves, lotions, and ointment, as it can be absorbed through the skin once it has gone through the decarboxylation process.
Wolf gave me a preview of the meal: marijuana-free chicken Marbella and couscous, paired with infused sides and appetizers. The dishes had been set out on a sideboard. Next to each one was a card with the potency level noted in calligraphy: “Stuffed Mushrooms, 5 mg THC each.” (Five milligrams of tetrahydrocannabinol is about the equivalent of a few puffs from a joint.) The secret to cooking with cannabis is fat. THC, the main psychoactive ingredient, bonds to fat molecules when heated. There are high-tech ways of doing this, but Wolf prefers to do it “the old-fashioned way, with good butter and good oil.” Her cookbooks always begin with recipes for what she calls canna-butter and canna-oil.

I am always asked what kind of oil is best to infuse.  That depends what you are going to use it for.  A neutral oil like canola, grapeseed, or vegetable oil is most versatile as you can use it most any recipe calling for oil.  For additional flavor elements, olive oil is a great choice.  You can even infuse solid at room temperature fats like coconut oil or vegetable shortening.  Use whatever works best for what you are planning to cook with it.
Oils go rancid whether infused or not and exposure to light and heat can increase this. You are likely safe for 2 to 3 months at least. Store for 6 months or more int he freezer, then just remove the amounts you need when you need it. BUT be cautious that you have removed ALL the moisture after infusing. I have had coconut oil grow mold, even in the fridge, as I did not get ALL the water out.
Disclaimer: Our products have intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of cannabis infused products. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.
Also, remember that you do not have to use just the primo bud. You can also extract cannabinoids from shake, stems, leaves, and trim. Shake is the leftover pieces at the bottom of your bag that frequently contain a mix of several kinds of cannabis. Commercial kitchens, especially in the United States, frequently use mixed bud for their cooking. If you can find it, consider this option. Save the primo stuff for smoking!
28 grams of flower 15-20% THC level. I crush the flower by hand so there is very little small grind/powder. I then turn on the crock pot on low and add 6 sticks of butter and start the melt. I put the ground up flower on a cookie sheet and cook at 225 for about 40-45 minutes. Take the Decarb flower and dump into the already melted butter and cook for 2 hours on low then 4 hours on warm, take it off heat and let cool for 4 hours and then put it back on warm setting for another 6-8 hours, pull it off cool it for 4 hours and do that one more time. I then put double layer of cheesecloth in a strainer and pour the mix and let it drain until I can’t see anything else dripping through. Then I fold up the cheese cloth and wrap another layer around that and squeeze the extra butter out. YES I know, I know I am adding a slight amount of bitterness from the plant but I want to get as much of the THC as I can get.
Your recipe will need to contain either a fat or an oil-based ingredient that can be infused with the cannabis concentrate. Such fats include butter, ghee, lard, shortening and other vegetable or nut oils. If your recipe does not list a “fat” ingredient, you can dilute the cannabis concentrate in a small amount of your favorite spirits: vodka, rum, cognac, etc.
As we discussed earlier, kief and hash can range from dry and crumbly to sticky and gummy.  Many smokers prefer the latter, but for cooking purposes, the dry, crumbly, powdery stuff is often easiest to work with because it is easy to grind which then allows you to stir the fine powder into all kinds of foods, something impossible to do with the gummy type of hash.  If you plan on dissolving the hash in a hot liquid, however, either type will work fine. Learn more about dealing with the various consistencies of hash and kief at this link.
However, making marijuana butter with concentrate is not the same as using traditional bud. Firstly, depending on how the oil is extracted, the THC can be already activated. This means you can skip the process of heating it up—it’s already ready to be used or ingested. Usually dispensaries can direct you to types of dab that have and haven’t undergone the THC activation process. Second, and perhaps more importantly, cannabis oil is an extremely concentrated (hence the nickname!) form of marijuana and can be much more effective than using regular Mary Jane. A good way to measure a comfortable dose is by simply doing the math. If a gram of cannabis oil is 70 percent THC (dispensaries usually disclose this information on the package), that means it contains 700mg of THC. With 48 teaspoons in one cup of butter, each teaspoon serving would boast 14.5mg of THC if you melted the cannabis oil gram with the butter. Most dispensaries have edibles in individual 10mg THC pieces, which is a great starting point for seeing what is comfortable. Another major difference is flavor: Some types of cannabis oil have intense flavors which carry over to whatever you’re cooking. Pick your concentrate carefully, as it can really affect the taste of the dish.
So to take the taste out, you basically have to extract as much of that stuff as possible by soaking the bud for a couple of days in distilled water, and then after that, blanching it. By blanching, you're basically getting a much purer flower to start with and later to infuse into your butter or oil. It's still going to smell like cannabis, but if you cook with it, you won't taste anything. Most canna-butters are usually green or even black. Mine is yellow.

"Written by a ten-year veteran of the iconic magazine, Elise McDonough, the cookbook is humorous yet educational and compassionate yet still strongly counter-culture, as befitting the magazine's 40-year legacy. For those people who require medibles in their own lives or make them as part of underground compassionate care groups...the book is a highly useful tool." -Houston Press
In regard to health, there are federal standards in the Occupational Safety and Health Guideline for permissible workplace exposure for n-butane. The recommendation is no more than “800 parts per million as an eight hour time weighted average.”  Although you’re probably not blasting butane for 8 hours at a time, it is important to know how to be safe around this gas. Butane exposure toxicity includes temporary and long-lasting symptoms like hallucinations, irritability, social withdrawal and central nervous system damage, according to the same federal report. Limit your exposure and be smart.
It depends on the strength of the kief and the tolerance of the person consuming it. Everyone responds drastically differently to cannabis, especially edible cannabis. While 10 mgs THC (the maximum per serving dose allowed in commercial edibles in many states) will be too much for some people, 100 mgs will not be enough for others. If you look at recipes for kief they recommend anywhere from 1/16 of a gram up to a gram (although in most cases that will be way too strong). This why I ever dosing extensively in my online cooking course and even a dosage calculator tool in my free online dosing class (find both at http://www.Cannademy.com ). Dosing is also covered extensively in my new book The Easy Cannabis Cookbook (http://bit.ly/EasyCannabisCookbook) and in less detail on this website (but the basics are also here) in the Marijuana Cooking Tutorials section under the Cooking Basics tab.

I can’t say that I’m a huge fan of mayo but working in the food business has shown me that it’s probably the single most popular condiment out there. People put mayo with everything. They’ll put it on subs, dip their fries in it, put it in the calzones and on their pizza. It’s insane how much people like mayo. So here’s this recipe for mayo that will taste awesome and it will also give you a little buzz. The recipe is really easy but just know that you will need cannabis oil so have some of the on hand before you start.

OK, this one isn’t a mistake as there is more than one way to infuse.  Some people do not like to add water to the mix, but I do.  Especially on the stovetop, the water will help things infuse at a lower temperature and avoid things burning and scorching which will result in unappetizing taste and THC that’s rendered useless by being cooked at too high a temperature. The water also helps with appearance and flavor by washing away some of the green color and strong herbal flavor.  The photo at the right shows marijuana butter made with and without water in the mix and marijuana oil made with and without water.  The same type and amount of marijuana was used for each of the infusions in the exact same amount. In all instances there was a better final yield when using water, and a lighter color and less herbal flavor.  The amount of water is not important, but I always add at least as much water as butter or oil. I do this even when infusing in the slow cooker.  Click to find instructions for how to make marijuana butter and cannabis oil.

Marijuana is oil-based, so knowing this is very important when it comes to cooking with cannabis. THC is the pyschoactive property in Marijuana and is contained in the capitate glands that cover its leaves, but the flowers / marijuana buds contain the most THC. When cooking or baking with marijuana, you should always use an oil-based product, such as butter or vegetable oil, as these do a great job at dissolving the capitate glands and releasing the THC. There are a few basic ways of using the cannabis plant for cooking: one is to make butter aka cannabutter and the other is to make flour. Another way is to make Marijuana Alcohol, which you can learn about in our marijuana beverages section. Either way you choose to make your marijuana induced foods requires the use of either the cannabis plant leaves and clippings or using the finished marijuana buds, which is my preference as it is by far the most potent way of making Weed Butter (Cannabutter). You can cook with cannaoil in any recipe that calls for oil.
You must be 21 years of age to attend our experiences. Please make sure to bring your non-expired ID, or State issued License. Temporary IDs cannot be used to validate entry into dispensaries and/or grow facilities. Non-US Citizens must present a valid passport to enter cannabis businesses. These are the rules of the Marijuana Enforcement Division.
A slow cooker is my favorite way, but you could also infuse on the stovetop in a double boiler (it just takes more babysitting). If you are going to buy a slow cooker temp variables are good to have for sure. I like the Hamilton Beach Stay and Go slow cooker because it clamps closed so you don’t get any kitchen odor while cooking. An Instant Pot on the slow cooker setting is also great and is versatile for other things (does the work of 8 or 9 different appliances) and also no odor while cooking.
The main concerns when decarbing, according to McDonough, are burning the cannabis or toasting it too long at too high a temperature. She recommends checking on it frequently and stirring it up if it gets too brown around the edges. The THC will evaporate at 392 degrees Fahrenheit/200 degrees Celsius, and at higher temps the THC starts converting to cannabinol, or CBN, a cannabinoid known for making people sleepy.
Nick and Mary eventually decided to follow his parents to Portland, where Mary began helping her mother-in-law with the company. She created a Facebook page and designed the logo, coming up with a whisk-and-marijuana-leaf motif. Before long, Mary told me, “I realized we could have a real business.” She and Wolf are an unlikely pair. In contrast to Wolf’s bohemian vibe, Mary exudes wholesomeness. She has short blond hair and rosy cheeks. “I call us Beauty and Obese,” Wolf said. In cooking videos on the Cannabist, they have an “Absolutely Fabulous” dynamic. When Mary says, “We’re going to mix it all into the pot, and it’s going to be delicious,” her mother-in-law exclaims, “Ha-ha. You said ‘pot!’ ” But their skills appear to be well matched. Wolf is the right-brain person, dreaming up recipe ideas, while Mary oversees the left-brain tasks, navigating Oregon’s complicated regulatory requirements.
Alice B. Toklas, who presided over literary salons in early twentieth-century Paris with partner Gertrude Stein, firmly ensconced the practice of cooking and eating cannabis in the cultural imagination with The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book. First published in 1954, it offered up a recipe for Hashish Fudge, which “anyone could whip up on a rainy day.” In addition to pulverizing a “bunch of cannabis sativa,” the recipe calls for black peppercorns, dried figs, and peanuts. In an introduction to the 1984 reprint of the book, food writer M.F.K. Fisher wrote that she had never tried one of the fudge brownies, but “am told they taste slightly bitter.” These days, no cannabis chef worth their herb would recommend throwing raw product into baked goods, but brownies can be an ideal vehicle for THC. It just takes a few more steps than Toklas imagined.
If you are baking snacks or desserts like cookies, cakes, brownies, candies or anything else you enjoy eating and are using marijuana in the recipe to get you high, you need to practice and stay patient as every recipe varies and everyone’s thc tolerance levels are different. Some of the most common recipes with marijuana in them are also the most “user-friendly” recipes. The most common Marijuana Edible Dessert Recipes are Chocolate Chip Cookies, Weed Brownies, Cannabombs as well as Baked Breads like Honey, Im Baked Banana Bread
So yeah, testing this hash butter made me melt into the floor and feel like I just wasn’t going to make it to see another day. Let my mistake stand as a reminder that you really need to be conscious of dosing your edibles. Even an experienced edibles writer sometimes gets hungry and eats half of a grilled cheese without calculating dosage first and spends half of her afternoon asking the farmer to remind her that she’s not, in fact, dying.
This 6-year-old cookbook is from High Times magazine, the pot-championing publication founded in 1974. The book collects recipes from various sources (cooks who’ve contributed to the magazine, a “dude from Texas”) and begins with a workmanlike introduction that covers some of the basics of working with and consuming cannabis. But those basics are minimal; strains of cannabis, relative potency and issues of temperature and decarboxylation aren’t covered. Dosing in the recipes is also vague: a recipe, for example, says it “stones 4,” and there’s no mention of how many mgs are in the servings. The recipes are fun, and hardly technically difficult: the chocolate layer cake calls for Betty Crocker cake mix and frosting. If the Munchies book is for hipster stoners, this one is for people who’ve been listening to their Cheech and Chong records on vinyl since the last time it was cool.
Your recipe will need to contain either a fat or an oil-based ingredient that can be infused with the cannabis concentrate. Such fats include butter, ghee, lard, shortening and other vegetable or nut oils. If your recipe does not list a “fat” ingredient, you can dilute the cannabis concentrate in a small amount of your favorite spirits: vodka, rum, cognac, etc.

BUT…that said, you must be EXTREMELY cautious when it comes to THC and pets, especially dogs as dogs have more cannabinoid receptors in their brains than any other species! Likewise, it is very easy for them to get too much. In most cases they will sleep it off and be fine but it is scary for the owner to watch and uncomfortable for the pet if they get too much. Overdose is characterized by a condition known as Static Ataxia, which is characterized by a wide-legged stance, drooling, disorientation, and the animal being hypersensitive to touch (if you pet dog who has had too much, it will react almost like an electrical shock). They are likely to have quick shallow breathing too. It can take hours to wear off and it is scary to watch.
Weed connoisseur Pilcher (Spliffs 3: The Last Word on Cannabis Culture) deals a gnarly collection of 35 starters, entrees, desserts and drinks, all using the kind of pot not generally found in the kitchen cabinet. Nor is this the type of cookbook that provides a list of suppliers for hard-to-find ingredients. But for the reader with a ready stash, these offerings are served up in a well-researched and easy to digest manner, with plenty of tempting color photos and helpful data such as the suggested amount of cannabis bud per person per meal, based on body weight. The key to being a successful ganja gourmet, it turns out, is to first prepare a smooth batch of either Cannabis Ghee or Cannabis Butter. This allows for easier measurement but more importantly ensures that the psychoactive chemical du jour, tetrahydrocannabinol, blends evenly into the dish. Thus three tablespoons of Cannabutter transform perfectly legal mushrooms into Really Wild Mushroom Sauté and the hopped-up ghee is at the heart of an in-your-face Charas Curry, where it mingles with red chilies, ginger and cilantro. There's a classic brownie recipe, of course, sweetened with honey. (Oct.)
Enjoy ur site. I like the mason jar technique. I bought a cold brew coffee filter that inserts into the larger mason jar. Put ur weed into the inside of the strainer filter. Holds a oz or more. Put whatever oil or butter into mason jar with water. For the lid of mason jar I took a skinny nail and made 2 very small holes into the top. Now no need to burp the jar. The build up has a place to escape. Next I put the mason jar into my pot fill it with water enough to come up past my material level …then put my sous vide into the pot. I set my temp at 190 and set my timer for 3 to 6 hours. Does pretty damn good. I do restrain what’s in the filter and run hot water over it. The crock is also a preferred choice. I own a magical butter, a levo…save ur money folks they are glorified crock pots with a hefty price tag.!! Save ur $$ and get yourself some flower or other herb source. The ardent is good, just a little on the small side and the tcheck is also good to have. It takes the guess work out. Also if possible I would like to see a good easy way to infuse chocolate, milk and white and a easy potent hard candy. You do a great job on bringing Info, good solid info to the masses. Today here in Philly I saw on the news they are finally going to put recreational on the table for discussion we do have medical. They are also supposed to discuss reducing sentences for those who have been convicted. Hope to see this soon. Anywho yada…have a great day and keep it coming…
Now, removed the cakes from the muffin pan and let them cool. Once they’ve cooled off, you can start frosting them. Stack whichever colors you want in any way. Frost each layer so that they stick together. If you need to, stick it with a toothpick. The ones I made were a huge mess. Delicious. But a mess. When cut in half, these little surprises will impress all of your friends, especially if you’ve added bud to them! And as always, you can add however much or however little weed you want to. It all depends on your preference! Enjoy!
This book, based on the Munchies and Viceland television series “Bong Appétit,” was published in October by Ten Speed Press. (This is in itself notable, as Ten Speed is one of the best cookbook publishers around, and continues the legitimate trajectory of the cannabis cooking genre.) The book has a comprehensive introduction that includes topics such as dosing, techniques, methods of decarboxylation and infusion, cannabis pairing tips, questions to ask your dispensary, tips on equipment and more. The recipes are sourced from the Munchies test kitchen and from many well-known chefs, whose recipes are recalibrated to add cannabis. Thus: Korean fried chicken from Deuki Hong of San Francisco’s Sunday Bird; fried soft-shell crab with shishito pepper mole from Daniela Soto-Innes of Cosme and Atla; and (my favorite) Joan Nathan’s preserved lemons. The Munchies test kitchen also has some fun ones, including herb focaccia with, well, herb; and confit octopus, in which a whole octopus is poached in cannabis-infused olive oil. If that sounds too aspirational, there are instructions for making an apple bong — a hollowed-out apple filled with weed-infused mezcal — at the end of the drinks chapter.
“Oh, yeah. There’s a lot more shit weed than there is high-quality cannabis.”The edible portion of the evening commenced. In the dining room, the conversation turned, inevitably, to the subject of the Times columnist Maureen Dowd, who, in 2014, shortly after the first licensed cannabis retailers opened for business, travelled to Denver and bought a cannabis chocolate bar. Back in her hotel room, she ate part of the bar, and then, when she felt nothing, ate some more. She described what happened next in that week’s column:
Pour the ounce of ground cannabis into the upper chamber and mix well with the wooden spoon. Allow the mixture to continue to simmer for 30-40 minutes, stirring regularly, until the liquefied butter turns emerald green. While the butter is infusing, wipe out the large mixing bowl that held the cannabis, stretch a piece of cheese cloth across the rim and secure it with a rubber band.
Seven years ago, when Colorado and Washington became the first states to legalize recreational use, Danny Schaefer saw a business opportunity. Schaefer wasn’t interested in growing or distributing cannabis, but he knew visitors would flock to Colorado to openly participate in a drug culture long forced underground. So he founded My 420 Tours, which bills itself as “the original Colorado cannabis tour.” They offer all-inclusive vacations that include pot-friendly hotels, growhouse tours, cannabis massages and sushi and joint rolling classes.
Hey i just tried the oil in the crockpot method, turned out to what seems like good oil ( have done stove top in past) i tried two teaspoons in a small amount of water for a potency test but havent had any real results ( used about 2 1/2 cups of trimmings and small buds to 1 cup oil) im just curious is that possible to the way ive ingested it? Would baking into something and trying that be a better “strength” test? Thanks!
Thank you for pointing that out. I will go in and rewrite to avoid confusion. You DEFINITELY want to decarb if the hash will not be cooked. If you are using hash in a cooked dish, the process of cooking can decarb it, HOWEVER, for maximum potency I recommend decarbing first in either instance. A medical marijuana provider friend of mine in WA state did an experiment by making 2 pans of brownies. In one he used kief that had not been decarbed, in the other kief that had been decarbed. Even though the process of baking the brownies will debarb some of the THC, he found the pan of brownies made with the kief that had been decarbed, lab tested about 30% higher than the other. SO my motto is decarb first in either instance.
The Dope Cup was held on a Sunday. Laurie & MaryJane had entered its brownies and almond bites in the competition. The Wolfs arrived at 10 p.m., three hours after the event started, because, as Laurie told me, “everybody’s late in this business.” The atmosphere was part county fair, part tent revival. A rap group, the Pharcyde, performed on a stage, and reps from marijuana businesses had set up booths. Wolf mingled with the crowd, which was mostly young and male. There were the seven scruffy dudes from 7 Points Oregon, the boutique growers whose product she’d used at her dinner party, and there was a purchasing agent from a dispensary called Canna-Daddy’s, who was holding a twenty-three-inch blunt. He wrapped Wolf in a bear hug. “Laurie’s the nicest lady I’ve ever met,” he told me.
The first step is to infuse the olive oil with cannabis. Using the cheesecloth and the twine, wrap the cannabis up in to a little bundle. Make sure the bundle is secure so that none of the cannabis gets in to the oil. Put the oil in to a pot and toss in the cheesecloth cannabis bundle. Put a cover on the pot and allow the oil to simmer on low heat for about 24 hours. When the 24 hours is up, remove the bundle while wearing gloves (be careful, it may be hot). Squeeze out the leftover oil, as a lot will get trapped in the ground cannabis inside. Put the now cannabis infused oil back on the stove and slowly add in the beeswax. As the wax melts, be sure to have your jars set up on the side, ready for the finished mixture. After the wax has completely melted, stir in the vitamin E and the Arnica oil. Keep in mind that once this mix is removed from the heat source, it will begin to solidify so very quickly take it from the stove and move it in to the jars. Leave the jars uncovered to set overnight.

If you haven’t yet discovered the wonder that is cannabis-infused eating, I’m excited for you because you’re in for an adventure. The experience from start to finish is significantly different from the other common inhalation methods. The effects are typically longer, stronger, and slower to set in. For this reason, always start with a low dose and see how an edible affects you — especially if you’re cooking your own as it is impossible to calculate their potency.
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