Next, fill a large pan with the vegetable oil and let that get nice and hot. Remember to be careful when handling hot oi,l it has a tendancy to be mean and pop around when it’s hot. You’ll know the oil is the right temperature if you put a small drop of batter in, and it starts to sizzle and turn brown, now it’s ready to start cooking your special bananas.
This book, based on the Munchies and Viceland television series “Bong Appétit,” was published in October by Ten Speed Press. (This is in itself notable, as Ten Speed is one of the best cookbook publishers around, and continues the legitimate trajectory of the cannabis cooking genre.) The book has a comprehensive introduction that includes topics such as dosing, techniques, methods of decarboxylation and infusion, cannabis pairing tips, questions to ask your dispensary, tips on equipment and more. The recipes are sourced from the Munchies test kitchen and from many well-known chefs, whose recipes are recalibrated to add cannabis. Thus: Korean fried chicken from Deuki Hong of San Francisco’s Sunday Bird; fried soft-shell crab with shishito pepper mole from Daniela Soto-Innes of Cosme and Atla; and (my favorite) Joan Nathan’s preserved lemons. The Munchies test kitchen also has some fun ones, including herb focaccia with, well, herb; and confit octopus, in which a whole octopus is poached in cannabis-infused olive oil. If that sounds too aspirational, there are instructions for making an apple bong — a hollowed-out apple filled with weed-infused mezcal — at the end of the drinks chapter.
Place the sweet potatoes in a preheated oven at 400 degrees F until they are soft. Peel the potatoes and then mash them with 3 ounces of bud butter and 1 tablespoon of rum. Place this mixture aside for now and melt the remaining ounce of bud butter with a sauté pan. Add in the sugar and stir the mix until the sugar melts fully and it begins to bubble slowly. Toss in the grapefruit and sauté this all together until the liquid is reduced by about half. Grab your fresh grapefruit juice and add that in as well as the last 2 tablespoons of rum. Cook this all together for about a minute. Add this new mix in with the sweet potatoes and mix together well. Season with salt and pepper to taste if you would like and boom! These mashed grapefruit sweet potatoes are hot and ready to serve! Enjoy!

Decarboxylation: Ingesting or cooking with fresh cannabis will not have much of an effect because the THC has to be “activated” with heat. This process is called decarboxylation, or “decarbing.” Typically, THC is decarboxylated before cooking in order to produce the effects of cannabis. It is worth noting that it must be heated slowly in order to retain any product for the cooking process.


Take Viceland’s Bong Appétit, by far the biggest hit of the genre. Last year, it was nominated for a James Beard award, a top honor in the cooking world. The first two seasons featured dreamy sequences about sourcing local ingredients, bite-sized lessons in how to infuse various fats and oils with marijuana and, at the end of each episode, a giggle-ridden dinner party populated by the kind of chill stoners who would never judge you for being too high. (I found this out when I appeared on an episode that aired last summer.)
This product can also be placed on top of a standard bowl of cannabis flowers. The oil melts down when heat from a lighter is applied and coats the bowl with a gooey, flammable crust. If the High CBD Hash Oil catches fire just snuff it out and try to keep a rolling cherry (constantly hot and smoking bowl) to maximize the amount of medication consumed.
That evening’s festivities were business, of a kind. Dope, a “cannabis lifestyle” magazine, was hosting its annual Oregon Dope Cup in Portland. The event is one of many that aspire to be the Oscars of the legal-cannabis industry. Laurie & MaryJane had won a Best Edible trophy at the previous Dope Cup, in Seattle, for its savory nuts. Last year, the company agreed to host an edibles dinner for the magazine’s guests, including the cup’s judges, who had flown in from Colorado.

Studies show cannabidiol (CBD) has tremendous medical potential, especially in the treatment of seizure disorders and pediatric patients. Indications also suggest CBD lowers blood sugar, which makes it desirable for treating diabetes. Its sedative properties make it useful in the treatment of stress-related and sleep disorders. CBDA and CBD are non-psychoactive. Unlike THCA and THC, converting CBDA to CBD will not make a psychoactive product. CBD has a calming effect. This makes it ideal for treating children, the aged or patients that prefer less psychoactive effects. THC vaporizes quicker than CBD, so decarboxylating higher CBD varieties may produce higher CBD-enriched material. However, if you are not using a high CBD strain, extending the heating process may accomplish no more than burning off the THC.
Any recipe that calls for butter or oil can be substituted with cannabis-infused coconut oil. The one thing to keep in mind when cooking with cannabis infused oil is to keep the oven/stove temperatures at or below 300°F. As temperatures begin to exceed 315°F, you risk inadvertently vaporizing your precious cannabinoids. If a baking recipe calls for a temperature of 350+°F, we recommend baking at 300°F and extending the baking time accordingly (even if that means 30+ minutes longer).
For decarbing I would not recommend a large skillet like that as I doubt the temperature is consistent throughout and it is not meant for baking – you would have a hot spot under the dish, it might work, but I can’t see it’s your best option. I think a small well made toaster oven, with oven thermometer would be a better choice for someone on a budget.
While too much heat will kill your THC, some heat is necessary. Most people do not realize the raw cannabis plant contains no THC at all. It does contain THC-A (or THC-acid). It takes the process of adding heat or decarboxylation to make the chemical reaction that converts THC-A to THC. If you are infusing butter or oil, some decarboxylation is taken care of in the process of infusion, mostly.  But lab tests show that even when making infusions, decarbing first will up the percentage of THC extracted.  If you are cooking with kief you will need to decarboxylate first. I recommend this step when cooking with hash too, as it can help maximize THC potency.   For more info on decarboxylation, why you need it, and how to do it, see this page.
This recipe is super simple and the only other step that you need to take is putting them in the freezer. You have two choices. You can put the whole bowl in the freezer and let them freeze in a large mass. This method is good if you prefer to eat ice cream right out of the tub. Just make sure that you have a good container that seals well. The other way that you can go about this is to roll the mixture in to small balls and freeze them that way. Whichever method you choose, this treat will cure hunger and get you baked!
Cannabis cooking oils like olive, peanut, or canola are great ways to inject THC into your meal. Cook with it as you would normally, just be mindful of how much you’re using since the effects of ingesting cannabis are slower to set in and last much longer than smoking. Ideas: saute veggies, roast potatoes, marinate meat, or mix up a vinaigrette for your favorite salad.
Combine in your glass jar, 3 ounces of drinking alcohol with your ounce of hash oil, or in a 3:1 ratio, according to the strength of your hash oil.  Seal the mixture and put it in the freezer for 6 or more days, shaking a few times per day.  Now store your tincture in your one ounce eye drop bottles.  Before taking, you should first calculate how much thc each dropper, and each drop holds, according to the strength of the hash oil and how much you’ve used.  This method has the most easy method of consumption.  Use the eye dropper to squirt a measured amount of weed tincture under the tongue, hold for half a minute, then swallow it down.  The thc and other cannabinoids will bring health benefits, but the psychoactive ingredients will have less effect because it may not have been activated by heat.  As with any oral consumption, effects come on slow and then goes stronger for longer.  It is important to make sure you know how much cannabinoids you are consuming, and not to re-dose before the effects take hold, which can take as much as one to two hours.

kief: Flickenger appreciates that kief is more potent than regular decarbed bud (making it a more economical ingredient), and also that it cuts down on prep time. “There’s no need to strain, like when you’re using fresh bud,” he says. “There’s no need for people to have it in a Crock-Pot for six hours or strain it through pantyhose to make sure every little bit gets out.”
I have an ardent lift (for decarboxalation) I feel as if it over does it? It runs for about 2 hours, and claims that it’s a perfect decarb everytime. 2 hours seems a bit long. Also when I have used trim, I notice the thc % is a little bit too low. Or has at times tested at 0% (using the tcheck device) I am aware that flower bears much stronger results. .should I stick to flower for streng?
The day after the dinner party, Wolf picked me up in her car, a Kia Soul in a shade called kale green. “The perfect Portland color,” she said. Despite her affinity with the city, she still thinks of herself as a New Yorker, and seems to enjoy shocking West Coast sensibilities. “People here are so earnest,” she said. “I once told a group of people someone’s baby looked like a tampon. They were, like, ‘I’ve never heard anyone say that out loud.’ ”
Corinne Tobias, a home cook who writes about cooking with cannabis on her blog Wake + Bake, described an experience in which she ate half of an infused grilled cheese sandwich and got “super crazy ridiculously messed up.” She wrote that she felt like she was “melting into the floor” and spent “half of her afternoon” asking for reassurance that she was not dying. “When I first started cooking with cannabis,” she writes, “I had no idea that it was going to be such a struggle to predict the perfect dosage. I’d make oil using the same method, but every time I harvested a different strain, my cannabis oil would be stronger or weaker and I had to spend a day or two as a human guinea pig, slowly testing my oil until I knew it was just right.” Now she is a fan of the tCheck, a $299 home potency tester.

I am a teetotaler, I don't drink, smoke or do drugs, but I also have no problem with other people doing whatever they want with their own bodies. I also consider myself to be a fairly competent chef, and combined with the fact that this book was only $3, I thought it might be an interesting read. Additionally, my grandfather died from wasting syndrome secondary to pulmonary fibrosis; had medical marijuana been available he probably would have lived several years longer and I'd have likely needed to learn how to prepare medicinal edibles.
Yippy!!! I am new to it but CO2 Hash/Kief is the best thing ever. It took a few hours to process all the shake but I had a lot. I actually used finer micro first 70 micron (high quality), then 90 micron (2nd grade), I stopped there but maybe should have done 120 for cooking purposes. The trim was a bit on the drier side and was blended in a blender first. If you can imagine I had family growing organic medicine then throwing away the trim for five years before I stopped them!
I’ve smoked for 50 years and I have discovered that including the seeds and stems leads to bad taste and headaches. I would presume that including them in any oil concoction would have the same bad side affects. For myself, I will carefully manicure any weed before I use it in any way. A little great stuff (buds without seeds) is better than a bunch of nasty tasting all-inclusive smoke. IMHO
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