If you have the luxury of being able to obtain your medicine from a legal dispensary near you, you may have noticed the large selection of edibles that are beginning to overflow the shelves. These pre-made, pre-packaged cannabis infused treats are more accessible to patients nowadays than ever before, but unfortunately many edibles still come packed with sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and other unhealthy ingredients. While these processed food delights can be an easy way to get medicated on the go, many medical marijuana patients prefer making their own medicated snacks and infused meals — and for good reason. Join us as we explore all of the popular cannabis cooking techniques and become a master chef in no time!
When cannabis is legalized on Oct. 17, Canadians still won’t be able to buy weed brownies in the store. Edible pot products aren’t part of the initial roll-out out, and there’s no word yet on when they will be available. You can, however, buy your own cannabis and turn it into special brownies, cookies and pretty much anything else you can dream up. Here’s how to do it.
5. Refrigerate the amber liquid overnight. The butter will rise to the top and become firm again. Scoop the butter from the top, and voila! Your Cannabutter is ready to use in any of your favorite recipes as a butter or oil substitute. Keep the remaining amber liquid to cook with, as it will contain residual THC. Use it in sauces or to boil noodles – the sky’s the limit.
This book, based on the Munchies and Viceland television series “Bong Appétit,” was published in October by Ten Speed Press. (This is in itself notable, as Ten Speed is one of the best cookbook publishers around, and continues the legitimate trajectory of the cannabis cooking genre.) The book has a comprehensive introduction that includes topics such as dosing, techniques, methods of decarboxylation and infusion, cannabis pairing tips, questions to ask your dispensary, tips on equipment and more. The recipes are sourced from the Munchies test kitchen and from many well-known chefs, whose recipes are recalibrated to add cannabis. Thus: Korean fried chicken from Deuki Hong of San Francisco’s Sunday Bird; fried soft-shell crab with shishito pepper mole from Daniela Soto-Innes of Cosme and Atla; and (my favorite) Joan Nathan’s preserved lemons. The Munchies test kitchen also has some fun ones, including herb focaccia with, well, herb; and confit octopus, in which a whole octopus is poached in cannabis-infused olive oil. If that sounds too aspirational, there are instructions for making an apple bong — a hollowed-out apple filled with weed-infused mezcal — at the end of the drinks chapter.
Beverage connoisseurs will delight in Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails & Tonics, an informative collection of cannabis cocktails and medicinal drinks that, when released, was a top selling book at Tales of the Cocktail (the largest cocktail festival in the world). Mixologist Warren Bobrow, the author of a handful of other cocktail recipe books and creator of the blog The Cocktail Whisperer, artfully pairs the fascinating science behind cannabis chemistry with detailed instructions on how to make stimulating tonics, bitters, syrups, herbal infusions, and more to create a book that any drink and cannabis enthusiast would be excited to check out.
When you have finished decarbing you will want to do a quick infusion into your oil. A great tip regarding reducing the infusion time is to only infuse for 15 minutes using a double boiler after decarbing, instead of the 3-4 prescribed hours from many cookbooks. Starting out with fully activated cannabis means you not only don’t have to do a long or high heat  infusion, but that you actually shouldn’t to retain all the potency.
5. Refrigerate the amber liquid overnight. The butter will rise to the top and become firm again. Scoop the butter from the top, and voila! Your Cannabutter is ready to use in any of your favorite recipes as a butter or oil substitute. Keep the remaining amber liquid to cook with, as it will contain residual THC. Use it in sauces or to boil noodles – the sky’s the limit.
When making your own edibles using dried flower, you first have to grind the cannabis flowers and bake them. If you’re making your own canna oil or butter, the recipe always starts with cooking the dried flower in the oven before it can be steeped in the oil. This heating process—whether it happens through a portable vaporizer or your kitchen’s oven—is called decarboxylation. In addition, accessory products like the LEVO and the Magical Butter Maker can help simplify the process.
I’ve found that doing a dry ice resin gland extraction on my plant matter gives me all of the great benefits I’m seeking with zero flavor of cannabis in my edibles. You can cook it into whatever oil you choose, I prefer coconut for it saturated fat which attaches to the CBDs best, and the entire process takes about the same 75 minutes, start to finish. Theonly addition is the 2# of dry ice (~$4) per 1/8-1/4# of trimmed plant matter.
Amazed and thankful you’ve been answering this thread for over a year. I’ve made a few batches of butter in my day and have never decarbed in the oven. Super potent butter achieved but always in the slowcooker or double boiler for around 12 hours stirring every 30 min or so. Clearly this is a time consuming process leading me to making batches only once or 12 a year if that. A friend of mine brought over a batch of cookies she said took her about 1:45 total with the decarb process that were damn good and almost as potent as mine using same quality/amounts of green. I’m baking cookies this week and I want to try decarbing but I’m worried about letting go of my tried and true method. Would decarbing at 215 and infusing in the slow cooker for 8 hours be ok or overkill? I’d love to get better results or the same with less prep time.
Andrea Drummer, Le Cordon Bleu graduate and owner of L.A.’s Elevation VIP, offers home cooks a chance to step up their cooking game by treating cannabis infusions like the culinary art that it truly is. In her cookbook, she explains the nuances of flavor profiles in specific strains and ways to pair them with food. For readers interested in elevating their dishes and bringing a touch of fine dining into kitchen, this cookbook will not only deepen your appreciation for an excellent dish, but also challenge you to improve your skills and techniques.
Many chefs have come up with ways to curtail the vegetal tang that so many find overwhelming. Yang says hot foods hide the flavor better than cold, as do foods with high sugar content, like juices. One popular cannabis gourmand, who goes by the moniker JeffThe420Chef, advocates soaking and blanching cannabis to rid it of things like chlorophyll, the green pigment vital for photosynthesis that is also responsible for a lot of the plant’s grassy taste. Sayegh says he has become accustomed to masking the flavor, bringing it into a balance with everything else in the dish so that diners won’t taste it unless he wants them to.
Wolf places herself in the last category, but she admitted that her heart is with the hippies. She seemed troubled by the men of the Trichome Institute. Though they were obviously “passionate” about cannabis, she worried that they were a marketing operation. “ ‘Budtender’ classes online!” she moaned. She especially disliked a plan to regularize the grading system for cannabis. “To me, it’s like picking a baby,” Wolf said. “Like saying, ‘Well, you definitely want your baby to be blond, but maybe with green eyes.’ It feels so removed from the community aspect of this business. It’s making it soulless.”
Beverage connoisseurs will delight in Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails & Tonics, an informative collection of cannabis cocktails and medicinal drinks that, when released, was a top selling book at Tales of the Cocktail (the largest cocktail festival in the world). Mixologist Warren Bobrow, the author of a handful of other cocktail recipe books and creator of the blog The Cocktail Whisperer, artfully pairs the fascinating science behind cannabis chemistry with detailed instructions on how to make stimulating tonics, bitters, syrups, herbal infusions, and more to create a book that any drink and cannabis enthusiast would be excited to check out.
This is my first batch. I used 1oz manicured ground cured bud in 1lb of butter. I put both in a slow cooker plus a cup of water. I set the cooker to the lowest temp for the longest time. Next day, I poured the butter & bud (water evaporated) through a tea strainer into a pyrex measuring cup. I had no cheesecloth and I suspect I’ll want to strain the cannabutter again before I put it in (Cook’s Illustrated Classic) Brownies. We will make the brownies next week. Wish us well.
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