The ongoing mission with The Marijuana Cookbook is to collect and print recipes that offer edible alternatives to smoking MMJ, as smoking does not fit into everyone’s lifestyle. The Marijuana Cookbook will include recipes and directions on how to prepare a variety of medibles from soups and salads to main dishes and deserts – and everything in between.
Support for legalized marijuana has increased exponentially over the last couple of decades. According to the Pew Research Center, 61 percent of Americans now support legalization, compared to just 31 percent in 2000. In the West, weed is a way of life: Recreational use is legal in Washington, Oregon, California, Colorado, Nevada and Alaska. And as legalization spreads to other states – it’s on the ballot in Michigan this November – many expect other entrepreneurs to lean on the example set by innovative Westerners. 

By the time you finish mixing together your marijuana/egg/food coloring mix, the ham that’s been cooking should be done. Remember to keep an eye on it while mixing up the eggs as well, to make sure that it doesn’t burn. When the ham has finished cooking to your liking, pour the eggs over the ham in the frying pan. Continue to cook the eggs and ham together until the eggs are scrambled (it shouldn’t take too long). Serve up your green eggs and ham with some toast (preferably with medicated butter or jelly on top!) and enjoy your holiday!
I’ve used distillate for cooking and had amazing results. Seeing as how the distillate is already decarbed, I used a double boiler. I used 2 cups of unrefined coconut oil. I dissolved the oil in the double boiler then added the distillate. Simply let it melt in to the oil for about 10 minutes on a low temp. Some of the strongest edibles I have ever made.
Here’s what I would do to try to salvage it. Filter the sludge out as much as possible, use a cheesecloth-lined strainer or even better a fine mesh bag like used for making nut milks. Then put the remaining butter and water in a container and put it in the fridge or even freezer. The butter should separate and harden on top. Hopefully, you will still have something you can use. It’s probably not going to taste very good, but you should be able to salvage something.
As Hukill demonstrated how to make the perfect pot brownie Saturday afternoon, Basil leaned forward in his seat and asked if cannabis could be infused into foods other than desserts. Before Hukill could answer, other attendees – many of them Portland residents who have played with cannabis in their own kitchens – piped up. Toss Brussels sprouts in cannabis-infused butter, one suggested. Find an online recipe for cannabis-infused simple syrup, said another, and have fun mixing cocktails.

Decarboxylation: Ingesting or cooking with fresh cannabis will not have much of an effect because the THC has to be “activated” with heat. This process is called decarboxylation, or “decarbing.” Typically, THC is decarboxylated before cooking in order to produce the effects of cannabis. It is worth noting that it must be heated slowly in order to retain any product for the cooking process.
An important step, decarboxylation, will maximize the THC content of the plant material you use to make concentrated oil. Catalano recommends  baking plant material at 220 degrees for 25 minutes. “Everyone has a different time and temperature for their methods. I prefer that time to preserve terpenes during second processes after the butter is made such as baking,” she says.  BHO can also be decarbed after it has been made by putting the BHO into an oven-safe, parchment paper-lined Pyrex dish and heating it at the same temperature for the same time.
Chefs Melissa Parks and Laurie Wolf (who was dubbed the “Martha Stewart of Marijuana Edibles” by the New York Times) combined their culinary talents to create Herb, a gourmet, cannabis-infused cookbook for all skill levels. With stunning images shot by photographer Bruce Wolf, this collection features hundreds of recipes from appetizers and entrees to drinks and desserts along with a handy guide to understanding dosage and how to make sure the potency of your infused butter or oil stays consistent.
When making your own edibles using dried flower, you first have to grind the cannabis flowers and bake them. If you’re making your own canna oil or butter, the recipe always starts with cooking the dried flower in the oven before it can be steeped in the oil. This heating process—whether it happens through a portable vaporizer or your kitchen’s oven—is called decarboxylation. In addition, accessory products like the LEVO and the Magical Butter Maker can help simplify the process.
“Oh, we will,” Montrose said, explaining that consumption quality would be judged at a later stage, but that it was essential to examine the plants first. “Some of the cannabis we looked at today, it looked, like, out of this world, outrageous, will blow you away. And you put it under the microscope and it’s full of webs and bugs and spiders, fecal matter, exoskeletons!”
Concocting your own pot brownies has long been a haphazard and inexact science for recreational stoners—instructions will vary on the amount of bud and method of infusion, and often DIY cannabis cooks pay no mind to the potency of the strain they're using. And while residents living in states where medical marijuana is legalized can buy a wide-range of dank, delicious edibles from dispensaries, the average pot enthusiast is more likely to dump an ounce of mids into some brownie batter than whip up something digestible if left to his own devices in an amateur cannabis kitchen.

Strain the oil.[5] Do this while the oil is still hot for best results. You can strain the oil using a wire strainer to remove the larger pieces of marijuana. If you still have solids you want to get rid of, strain a second time through a coffee strainer. This will take a lot of time so be careful and patient. You may want to do small batches while you continue to simmer the mixture.

Cannabis edibles have come a long way from brownies and cookies. Just ask Cheri Sicard, nicknamed the “Martha Stewart of weed” by The Daily Beast, who serves up the most definitive guide to cooking with cannabis in The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. Featuring a comprehensive introduction to the history and benefits of cannabis, a fool-proof guide to finding your perfect dose, and 60 reliable recipes that redefine stoner eats, this cookbook makes eating homemade edibles easy.
Since I generally like to take microdoses of cannabis (about 10mg or less) throughout the day when I need to medicate, I’ve never really delved into the world of making ridiculously strong cannabis oil or butter. I realize that some people need stronger medicine, but those people aren’t me, and I don’t have the tolerance to test strong oil without getting really really really messed up, so I never did it.
When your cannaoil or cannabutter is done infusing, remove any plant matter by carefully straining it through cheesecloth (available in the cooking section of stores like Target or Walmart) or a coffee filter. Pour your infusion into a container and you’re done! Be sure to put your cannabutter in the fridge to harden, but cannaoils are fine to store on the counter. The most important thing is to keep it in an airtight container (mason jars work great) in a cool, dark space.
 In a bowl, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and oatmeal, mix well. Grab another bowl and beat eggs, salt, and vanilla. In another large bowl add the canna-butter, oil, and both sugars. Add in the egg mix until creamy and smooth. Then pour in the flour mix and stir everything in together. Now add in the raisins and mix once more.

When cannabis is legalized on Oct. 17, Canadians still won’t be able to buy weed brownies in the store. Edible pot products aren’t part of the initial roll-out out, and there’s no word yet on when they will be available. You can, however, buy your own cannabis and turn it into special brownies, cookies and pretty much anything else you can dream up. Here’s how to do it.
Creating cannabutter or cannaoil at home is a simple process no matter which oil you choose. The trickiest part can be getting the ratio of oil to bud just right. A common canna oil ratio is 1 cup of oil to 1 ounce of ground marijuana. For cannabutter, your ratio would be 1 pound of butter to 1 ounce of weed. Although widely used for many years, the need for so much cannabis in your recipe is primarily due to the high cannabinoid loss that comes with attempting to decarboxylate (or activate) during infusion. An ounce of flower testing at 18% THCa decarbed in your Ardent Decarboxylator will yield approximately 5,040mg of THC!
Successful website The Stoner's Cookbook already helps marijuana-loving cooks with their archive of hundreds of thousands of cannabis-infused recipes that include meals, snacks, drinks, and desserts. They are now compiling their most popular recipes into a "high-class cannabis cookbook [that] will make history." The book, titled HERB: Mastering the Art of Cooking with Cannabis, has already been featured in a New York Times article and boasts almost 3,000 pre-orders in anticipation of its November 2015 release date. The 200-page book will not only feature hundreds of recipes (like butternut squash soup and a seared bone-in ribeye), but it will also teach readers the science behind marijuana, extraction methods, and medicinal purposes.

5. Refrigerate the amber liquid overnight. The butter will rise to the top and become firm again. Scoop the butter from the top, and voila! Your Cannabutter is ready to use in any of your favorite recipes as a butter or oil substitute. Keep the remaining amber liquid to cook with, as it will contain residual THC. Use it in sauces or to boil noodles – the sky’s the limit.
“My parents were a great introduction to the rest of the world, basically,” says Sayegh, who hopes that finely prepared food combined with the capacity to discuss the molecular structure of cannabis will help strip away the stigma of a plant still federally classified alongside heroin as a Schedule I drug. Far from a scourge, Sayegh and others see immense medical and economic potential in the herb.
The first course was herbed white beans with grapefruit, blood orange and asparagus with heirloom carrot, sumac, pomegranate and 2 milligrams of THC. Then came hamachi and caviar alongside asparagus rolled in hemp seed; broccoli stalks with THC-infused habanero mousse and dandelion purée; and lamb Wellington anointed with a spice rub, mint pesto, and a THC-dosed lamb jus. Eight courses and 10 milligrams later, the guests had grown convivial, suit jackets slung over chairs, giggling as a live cellist played in the background. By the end, says chef Chris Sayegh, everyone was “euphoric.”
Most oils come in bottles with small pipettes or syringes with measurements on them. Remember that it takes as long as 1-2 hours for effects to kick in, and by taking another dose before the height of the first effects, you’re risking some side effects. If the oils are in capsule format, measurement is much easier as you just take the recommended amount of capsules throughout your day.
With such an awesome title, how can you not be intrigued as to how to make this amazing holiday treat? It’s medicated, delicious, and can make the perfect addition to a holiday party or as a present. These cookies are your normal medicated chocolate chip cookies but with a twist! Theres vanilla pudding added in as well, giving these cookies a different taste then what most people are used to. This will definitely give you the upper hand at winning who makes the best cannabis cookies!

Frankly either making the butter the way I described it, or making it the boiling water method is easiest. Making tinctures and oils is a pain, and taste like complete crap. Don’t put raw pot in food as it won’t carboxylate, which is the heating process to make the thc become available to your body. That’s why making butter or oils is the best way to ingest it. You can use it just like you would butter, you can make candy from it, or brownies, or whatever, but why go to all that trouble to have pot tasting candy and food? I don’t find it unpleasant by itself, but I would in my eggs, or pizza, or whatever. I too have COPD issues (61), so I eat butter instead of smoking. The difficult part about making butter is depending on where you are, weed can be really expensive. If you make it the way I described above, just make sure it isn’t getting too hot. If it starts foaming too much, take it off the heat for a bit, turn the heat down a little, and put it back on. You want somewhere between medium to medium low heat depending on your stove. I don’t think this is the answer you’re looking for, but this is what I know. If you want the boiling water method I’ll post it for you. It’s more time consuming, but probably safer since you have no prior experience making butter directly on heat. I used to be a chef, so it’s like making Hollandaise sauce without a double broiler. I’m just used to doing it this way. And one more word of caution, it makes your house stink, really, really stink. So keep the windows closed and don’t have the grandkids over for a day or two 😉
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