First smash the bananas in a large bowl and then add the eggs, sugar, canna-flour, salt, baking soda, and walnuts. Mix all the ingredients in together and pour mixture into your buttered baking tin. Put it in the oven and let it cook for an hour. Once it’s done you get to bite into chewy, nutty, banana bread that not only fills your stomach but gets you baked too! Enjoy Marijuana Banana Bread!!
This book, based on the Munchies and Viceland television series “Bong Appétit,” was published in October by Ten Speed Press. (This is in itself notable, as Ten Speed is one of the best cookbook publishers around, and continues the legitimate trajectory of the cannabis cooking genre.) The book has a comprehensive introduction that includes topics such as dosing, techniques, methods of decarboxylation and infusion, cannabis pairing tips, questions to ask your dispensary, tips on equipment and more. The recipes are sourced from the Munchies test kitchen and from many well-known chefs, whose recipes are recalibrated to add cannabis. Thus: Korean fried chicken from Deuki Hong of San Francisco’s Sunday Bird; fried soft-shell crab with shishito pepper mole from Daniela Soto-Innes of Cosme and Atla; and (my favorite) Joan Nathan’s preserved lemons. The Munchies test kitchen also has some fun ones, including herb focaccia with, well, herb; and confit octopus, in which a whole octopus is poached in cannabis-infused olive oil. If that sounds too aspirational, there are instructions for making an apple bong — a hollowed-out apple filled with weed-infused mezcal — at the end of the drinks chapter.
Mary only recently told her family in Oklahoma about the new turn in her career. “I was so nervous,” she said. “I felt like I was coming out to them.” She was surprised to learn that they were curious about the medical uses of cannabis. One relative, who has chronic pain, started taking a Laurie & MaryJane brownie instead of painkillers to help him sleep. (He got his doctor’s approval.) Another uses their infused coconut oil to treat his aging dog’s epilepsy. (He mixes it with dog food.)
Wolf learned about food at friends’ homes and on vacations, which featured pit stops for roadside delicacies like fried apple pies. After college, at N.Y.U., she ran a catering business, then studied at the Culinary Institute of America, where her nickname was Noodles. She worked in several Manhattan restaurants, including the River Café and a small Upper East Side place called the Wine Bistro. In 1980, she met Bruce, who turned her on to food styling, the art of preparing food for photo shoots. She started doing freelance magazine work, writing recipes for Self, New York, and Mademoiselle, then moved to the parenting magazine Child, where, for nineteen years, she wrote a monthly column on family-friendly recipes.
In most instances, oil will rise to the top of the water but won’t solidify.  No problem.  You can use a spoon to skim the oil off the water.  Even better is a kitchen gadget called a gravy separator that looks like a small pitcher with the spout originating on the bottom.  This unique design allows the water to be poured out while retaining every drop of the oil floating at the top.  During the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, gravy separators are sold everywhere, otherwise find them at gourmet shops.  You can also find extra large gravy separators year round at restaurant supply stores.
If you were looking for the perfect game-day snack to serve to all your pals, then search no more! This nacho cheese is creamy cheesy bliss and when the high kicks in while the game’s on it won’t matter if your team wins or not, either way you’ll be happy dipping crunchy chips into this dip again and again. Both canna-butter and canna olive oil can be used in this dip so be prepared for some pretty potent bites.
It should be known that the combination of cannabis and red wine is extremely beneficial for the human brain. A glass of red wine paired with smoking a joint repairs brain connections and protects them from further damage. Some stoners, unfortunately, find that smoking and drinking cause adverse effects that are unpleasant to say the least. It’s thought that the smoking is what causes the nausea so being able to ingest the two at the same time without that sick feeling would be perfect! Thankfully, there’s this recipe for cannabis infused red wine that you can enjoy, hopefully with out the negative feelings that sometimes accompany the two.
reliably: McDonough even suggests using a method passed on to her by a food scientist that calls for spritzing decarbed bud with Everclear, an alcohol bottled at 190 proof, before infusing it into a fat, because the booze helps break down the plant cell walls, which “helps more THC escape into the solution and migrate out of the plant into the fat.”
Process:In a small mason jar mix in 1 gram High CBD Hash Oil to 3 fl. oz. of high-proof alcohol. Seal lid on the jar and shake vigorously. Place mixture into freezer. Leave for a minimum of 5 days shaking the jar twice daily and placing back in the freezer. Using a coffee filter and a separate container, strain the liquid removing any impurities (there should be very little solids). Pour the tincture into the 1 fl. oz.  eyedroppers.
Decarbing…. it sounds like your oven is not going to cut it for that. The slow cooker, unfortunately, does not get hot enough to properly do the job. I even tried under pressure in my Instant Pot and it only worked so-so. I don’t imagine you have a sous vide machine, most people don’t, but if you did this would work. It is basically a boil in bag but very temperature controlled. The other solution is a bit pricey, but I do like the Ardent decarboxylator as it takes away all the guesswork and gives perfect results every time (enter the coupon code CANNACHERI and $30 bucks off, thanks to the reader who asked for a discount code cause the company gave me one http://bit.ly/cheri-ardent). You can read my review of this gadget at https://www.cannabischeri.com/lifestyle/reviews/cannabis-product-reviews-ardent-decarboxylator-nova/ .

Now that we’ve gone over cannabis-infused oils, let’s dive into their similarly monikered cousin: cannabis oil. Similar to olive, vegetable, or coconut oil, cannabis oil is made through a chemical extraction process. There are a variety of methods that the marijuana industry uses to extract oil, resulting in similar but unique products. Most cannabis extraction methods involve a solvent, like butane or CO2—or extreme heat and pressure—to extract the cannabinoids. These processes can be time-consuming and usually involve expensive laboratory equipment. Without proper training and the right tools, extracting THC from weed using certain methods is downright dangerous. Unless you’re using a solventless method, the excess yield—or product that isn’t cannabis oil—needs to be removed in order for a clean, non-toxic final result. For those of us who aren’t chemistry experts, most methods of this process should be left to the professionals.
Healthy eating is important in the life of a stoner! Stir fry has always been a favorite of mine and now you can make it medicated! It’s a far cry from the food we made in Home Ec in middle school but it tastes even better, now that we’re old enough not to burn the veggies to the pan. You can add in veggies or meats if you feel like it and of course, more bud if you feel inclined. Just always remember that eating cannabis is much different than smoking cannabis and you should always know your tolerance before eating too much!
Still, the public’s appetite for shows about weed chefs — just like the public’s appetite for weed — may be outpacing the conservative sensibilities of the people making decisions. Food Network, among other major players, has yet to touch the subject of cooking with the federally illegal drug, so the Rachael Ray of pot cuisine is more likely to come out of an unconventional platform like California startup Prohbtd, which currently produces a cannabis-infused cooking web series called Pot Pie, hosted by the charming Brandin LaShea. “Having a digital platform is the new wave,” says LaShea, who will feature infused dishes on her next season. “I have freedom that I don’t think I’d have at a large network.”
Wolf’s mixed nuts have had a lot of traction. She adapted them from a Danny Meyer recipe and added infused coconut oil, a staple in her kitchen because it can also be used topically, “so you’re getting more bang for your buck.” (An elderly friend of Wolf’s rubs it on his hands to treat his rheumatoid arthritis.) Wolf’s newest book, “Cooking with Cannabis,” emphasizes comfort foods like mac and cheese and meatloaf. There’s a chapter called “Recipes for One,” intended for solo eaters. “It’s great to be able to make yourself ramen,” she said. (The cannabis goes in the broth, mixed with sesame oil.)
She decided that she could do better. At home, she came up with a recipe for infused almond bars, using the powerful taste of the almond extract to mask the taste of marijuana. “They had the texture of a thick sugar cookie,” she told me. “Crisp on the outside but chewy on the inside, with sliced almonds on top.” They contained a hundred and forty-five milligrams of THC. She sold them to local dispensaries, where they were a hit. The only complaint: even the heavy users were getting too stoned. You were supposed to eat only a fraction of the bar. “People would say, ‘They’re too delicious. I couldn’t stop eating it!’ ” Wolf said.
We recommend slightly amending your decarb time based on the moisture levels in the starting material; very dry material will need less time and fresher material will need significantly more time (it needs to dry and then decarb). In our experience, it is better to overdo the decarb than to come up short and not fully activate your cannabinoids. For reference, if you continue to decarb once all of the THCa has converted to THC, it will begin to convert to CBN, the strongest sedative of the known cannabinoids. Accordingly, if you desire sleep-inducing edibles, you should leave the tray of material in the oven longer than is suggested on this chart. The length of additional time will impact the ratio of THC to CBN in the edibles.
In the early days, Wolf tried selling baklava at Oregon dispensaries, which baffled the medical-stoner crowd. “We were catering to the lowest element of pot smokers,” Wolf said. Since then, the audience has changed: sophisticated consumers are known today as “cannasseurs.” They appreciate savory foods, not only because savories avoid cliché—“everybody infuses desserts,” Wolf said—but also because many medical-marijuana users are diabetic, or avoiding sugar for other reasons. Wolf recommends having a bottle of infused salad dressing or pesto on hand. “Infusing a pesto is so easy,” she said. “You can make a bunch and toss it with noodles, and you’ve got a delicious meal.”
This is a very important, but often overlooked step in the edible baking process. For those who are unfamiliar, the cannabinoids present is your starting material likely exist in their acidic, non-activated form. What does this mean? It means that THCa (‘a’ signifies acid) for instance, maintains many of the therapeutic properties associated with THC but NOT its psychoactive properties. Thus, if you desire the typical ‘high’ associated with edibles, you need to decarboxylate, or activate, your cannabinoids prior to infusing. Although the decarboxylation process begins immediately following the plant’s harvest, it must be accelerated with heat to ensure that all of the cannabinoids have converted from their acidic to their activated forms. For reference, this same process of decarboxylation is what occurs when you light up a one hitter or joint of cannabis.
I have been a few batches of High THC cookies when I started making “vegan” cookies for a few friends.Simply put.I used clarified unsalted butter.Well with little extra moisture,I burnt the bottoms of the 1st batch.So I figured.I would try 1,It fucked me up,But tated burnt.The next batch.I said fuck it & cooked them for less time.BIG DIFFERENCE..In cookies,hey will reach the 350 F temp & you will start burning off your THC.BUT in Brownies,which are thicker & moister,the inside doesn’t reach 350 F,so you don’t burn any THC off…When I’m ready to make cookie ONLY ,I decarb my bud at 240 for 20-30 minutes in a Pyrex (name brand- I use a glass pie pan).COVER with foil.Check at 25mins.Then ever 5 minutes.Do not go over 45 mins.Leave to cool COVERED in the glass pan.THUS when cooking,the bud will finish decarbing.FOR ANYTHING ELSE THRN COOKIES….ITS 240 FOR 30-40 MINS,,CHECKING AT 30 MINUTES,45 TOPS .after 45 minutes,you’re burning it off.Beening doing this this was for over 30yrs.

In those days, dispensaries catered to what Wolf calls “the medical-stoner community,” heavy users and people with chronic pain. The edible offerings were informal. “You’d say, ‘What kind of edibles do you have?’ They’d say, ‘Well, my grandmother makes these pot brownies. And my stepmother’s cousin makes these.’ ” The dosage was usually very high—over a hundred milligrams of THC in a single brownie. The taste was “dreadful,” Wolf said. “It was like somebody took a bud and dipped it in chocolate.”
The bigger issue is having too much THC, because if you have too much of that, the negative effects are pretty pronounced—you'll have anxiety, you'll get paranoid, you'll feel horrible, get nauseous, throw up, and then the next day you'll feel hungover and know you had a really bad experience. You don't want that. You have to know the percentage you're starting with, and then you have to know how that nets out in the butter or oil that you infuse it into.
Nobody can deny that the combination of kush and OJ is the perfect way to start your day. Not everyone is a coffee drinker, after all. Plus, orange juice is better for you anyway. The following recipe will allow you to create an awesome orange drink that you can bring with you on a hot day as a nice medicated smoothie or you can drink it with your bowl of cereal as an awesome wake and bake. Whatever you choose to do, this drink is absolutely amazing… And medicated.
With such an awesome title, how can you not be intrigued as to how to make this amazing holiday treat? It’s medicated, delicious, and can make the perfect addition to a holiday party or as a present. These cookies are your normal medicated chocolate chip cookies but with a twist! Theres vanilla pudding added in as well, giving these cookies a different taste then what most people are used to. This will definitely give you the upper hand at winning who makes the best cannabis cookies!
The definitive guide to making easy, everyday cannabis edibles for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert, my friend Cheri Sicard has done it again!  A lot of people ask for cannabis recipes and I always refer them to Cheri’s books.  Her latest, The Easy Cannabis Cookbook, is simple, fun and perfect for the novice marijuana enthusiast.  Check it out!

I usually cook them in the oven at 325 for about 15-20 minutes, checking on them occasionally. When finished, these incredible treats will either get you super baked or be a reasonably simple thing to make when you’re staring at the baking section in the grocery store. I promise that you’ll love these things, even if you don’t like chocolate (like myself). You can’t go wrong mixing a cookie with a brownie and candy. These are also amazing when served with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. Make these (medicated) and invite a few friends over. You’ll impress them and get them stoned!


Pour the ounce of ground cannabis into the upper chamber and mix well with the wooden spoon. Allow the mixture to continue to simmer for 30-40 minutes, stirring regularly, until the liquefied butter turns emerald green. While the butter is infusing, wipe out the large mixing bowl that held the cannabis, stretch a piece of cheese cloth across the rim and secure it with a rubber band.

Also, if you do plan on straining the milk, you can save what gets taken out of the mix and dry it. Store this mixture to use in edibles later! It’s always nice to have a recipe that reuses ingredients more than once, making sure to get as much benefit as possible from everything. This milk can also be flavored with all kinds of natural flavors! For this season, cinnamon would be absolutely perfect. Of course, try out a bunch and pick your favorite! Enjoy your healthy, delicious hempseed milk!


*Note that the total amount of cannabis oil will vary by individual. Optimal dose is determined through guidance from a qualified healthcare professional. If the infused oil is particularly strong, start with half of the recommended dose and increase the amount slowly. Always consult your physician should you have any questions when baking your own cannabis edibles. Keep these muffins safely out of reach of children, pets or anyone else who should not be using them. Make sure that they are properly marked and stored away securely. When baking with cannabis, remember to always start low and go slow.

This product may be applied to an “oil rig” for the highest intensity medication possible. An oil rig is a device used much like a traditional water pipe, or bong, which uses a heated element, usually titanium or quartz, to heat up the High CBD Hash Oil to a critical temperature. The oil is vaporized, channeled through water filtration for cooling, and inhaled by the user in a large concentration. This produces a less-bodied smoke that is not as thick as cannabis-plant smoke but equally expansive in the lungs and cough inducing.
Many chefs have come up with ways to curtail the vegetal tang that so many find overwhelming. Yang says hot foods hide the flavor better than cold, as do foods with high sugar content, like juices. One popular cannabis gourmand, who goes by the moniker JeffThe420Chef, advocates soaking and blanching cannabis to rid it of things like chlorophyll, the green pigment vital for photosynthesis that is also responsible for a lot of the plant’s grassy taste. Sayegh says he has become accustomed to masking the flavor, bringing it into a balance with everything else in the dish so that diners won’t taste it unless he wants them to.
The day after the dinner party, Wolf picked me up in her car, a Kia Soul in a shade called kale green. “The perfect Portland color,” she said. Despite her affinity with the city, she still thinks of herself as a New Yorker, and seems to enjoy shocking West Coast sensibilities. “People here are so earnest,” she said. “I once told a group of people someone’s baby looked like a tampon. They were, like, ‘I’ve never heard anyone say that out loud.’ ”
Every strain is, of course, unique. Maybe you want a high-CBD strain, a sedating Indica, or a peppy Sativa. All work great. Just make sure to use a strain that has a rich terpene profile to get the most health benefits from your oil. Also, we recommend using strains with lower THC levels that you might use for smoking or vaping — around 10 – 15% is good. No Durban Poison or Dutch Treat, please.
×