My issue is how INCONSISTENT my brownies have been. In the last 4-5 years I’ve made 8-10 batches of brownies, mostly done the same way (except once with a slow cooker and once i included a 40 minute oven decarb step vis a vis laurie wolf/the cannabist recipe) that have ranged from completely catatonic and narcotic, like debilitating. People with little to no tolerance have vomited from eating half of one. I smoke every day, including extracts and flower, for about 12 years and even i’ve been completely Fuzzed out to the point where i sleep and then wake up and i’m still FUZZED OUT! However, I’ve also made brownies that were totally delicious but completely sucked.

Because oils are slow-acting and long-lasting, it’s recommended that you start low, and go slow when experimenting with oils. They’re a much more concentrated version of flowers and buds and can have some unpleasant side effects like nausea, dizziness, thirst, and a drop in blood sugar levels if you go too quickly. Taking the oil with food in your stomach has been known to minimize nausea.


Take all of your fresh ingredients and place them in to a medium sized mixing bowl. Mix everything together for about ten minutes, making sure that everything is well blended. It should have the consistency of normal dressing, creamy and smooth. However, if you like your dressing to be slightly more or less creamy, you can adjust the recipe as you see fit. Don’t forget to add in the salt and pepper also. Once the dressing tastes right, place the bowl in the fridge for at least two hours before you serve it. Enjoy your medicated dressing!
The day after the dinner party, Wolf picked me up in her car, a Kia Soul in a shade called kale green. “The perfect Portland color,” she said. Despite her affinity with the city, she still thinks of herself as a New Yorker, and seems to enjoy shocking West Coast sensibilities. “People here are so earnest,” she said. “I once told a group of people someone’s baby looked like a tampon. They were, like, ‘I’ve never heard anyone say that out loud.’ ”
After assembling your materials, put your cannabis butter on low (REALLY LOW) heat on the stove the melt it. Take half of your Oreos and crush them up with the half of the Heath bars and add them to the butter. Put the other half of the crumbs on the inside of a 9×13 pan. Cover the crumbs as best as you can with the 1/2 gallon of ice cream. Then, take the butter and crumb mix and coat the top of the ice cream. Take your favorite flavor of syrup and cover the top layer. Stick this whole pan in the freezer and let it freeze. After a few hours, you’ll have a dank treat that will get you extremely baked… And taste so good!
This book, based on the Munchies and Viceland television series “Bong Appétit,” was published in October by Ten Speed Press. (This is in itself notable, as Ten Speed is one of the best cookbook publishers around, and continues the legitimate trajectory of the cannabis cooking genre.) The book has a comprehensive introduction that includes topics such as dosing, techniques, methods of decarboxylation and infusion, cannabis pairing tips, questions to ask your dispensary, tips on equipment and more. The recipes are sourced from the Munchies test kitchen and from many well-known chefs, whose recipes are recalibrated to add cannabis. Thus: Korean fried chicken from Deuki Hong of San Francisco’s Sunday Bird; fried soft-shell crab with shishito pepper mole from Daniela Soto-Innes of Cosme and Atla; and (my favorite) Joan Nathan’s preserved lemons. The Munchies test kitchen also has some fun ones, including herb focaccia with, well, herb; and confit octopus, in which a whole octopus is poached in cannabis-infused olive oil. If that sounds too aspirational, there are instructions for making an apple bong — a hollowed-out apple filled with weed-infused mezcal — at the end of the drinks chapter.

"The Easy Cannabis Cookbook is a critical resource to understand, in simple terms, the history and the science behind cannabis and the way we are hard wired to interact with it. Perhaps, more importantly, it is also a practical guide on how to safely incorporate phytocannabinoids nutritionally into the human diet the way evolution has decided it should be."―Dr. Lakisha Jenkins, Traditional Naturopath, Registered Master Herbalist
This 6-year-old cookbook is from High Times magazine, the pot-championing publication founded in 1974. The book collects recipes from various sources (cooks who’ve contributed to the magazine, a “dude from Texas”) and begins with a workmanlike introduction that covers some of the basics of working with and consuming cannabis. But those basics are minimal; strains of cannabis, relative potency and issues of temperature and decarboxylation aren’t covered. Dosing in the recipes is also vague: a recipe, for example, says it “stones 4,” and there’s no mention of how many mgs are in the servings. The recipes are fun, and hardly technically difficult: the chocolate layer cake calls for Betty Crocker cake mix and frosting. If the Munchies book is for hipster stoners, this one is for people who’ve been listening to their Cheech and Chong records on vinyl since the last time it was cool.
Take the sugar, syrup, and water and mix them together in a pot. Set it on the stove over a medium heat and stir them together until they ingredients dissolve. The mixture should begin to boil after a bit. Make sure that all of your ingredients have been mixed well! After the mixture begins to boil, slowly add the color and flavoring to the pot. Your mixture should be heated to about 300 degrees. This part is a little tricky because you have add the tincture very quickly. Speed is necessary at this part in the process because the liquid solidifies as soon as it begins to cool. Once you’ve quickly stirred in the tincture, pour the liquid in to your molds and let them set.
However, some people cook with cannabis at home and create their own cannabis oil by heating buds and flowers with a base oil like grapeseed or other cooking oils. Cannabinoids like THC and CBD are fat-soluble, hydrophobic oils, meaning they dissolve in oils, butters, fats and alcohol, but not water. To be effective, cannabis and its extracts or concentrates must be heated in order to convert the cannabinoid THCA into active THC.
Andrea Drummer is a Los Angeles-based culinary school grad and private chef specializing in cannabis cooking. Maybe because of her culinary training, the book is short on the science of cooking with cannabis and long on recipes, including some fun ones such as kimchi fried rice and escargot in puff pastry. This is both good and bad, as the recipes for infused stock, pasta dough and mayonnaise are comforting for home cooks, but the book doesn’t give much information about how to work with or use cannabis. (There’s also no index, which is frustrating.) Although Drummer gives bud pairings, as if she’s talking about a good Cabernet, decarboxylation isn’t even mentioned; recipes simply call for grams of “cannabis product.” This assumes a lot, and unless you’re already versed in this kind of cooking, you’ll need outside reference in order to use this one properly.
This 6-year-old cookbook is from High Times magazine, the pot-championing publication founded in 1974. The book collects recipes from various sources (cooks who’ve contributed to the magazine, a “dude from Texas”) and begins with a workmanlike introduction that covers some of the basics of working with and consuming cannabis. But those basics are minimal; strains of cannabis, relative potency and issues of temperature and decarboxylation aren’t covered. Dosing in the recipes is also vague: a recipe, for example, says it “stones 4,” and there’s no mention of how many mgs are in the servings. The recipes are fun, and hardly technically difficult: the chocolate layer cake calls for Betty Crocker cake mix and frosting. If the Munchies book is for hipster stoners, this one is for people who’ve been listening to their Cheech and Chong records on vinyl since the last time it was cool.
An important step, decarboxylation, will maximize the THC content of the plant material you use to make concentrated oil. Catalano recommends  baking plant material at 220 degrees for 25 minutes. “Everyone has a different time and temperature for their methods. I prefer that time to preserve terpenes during second processes after the butter is made such as baking,” she says.  BHO can also be decarbed after it has been made by putting the BHO into an oven-safe, parchment paper-lined Pyrex dish and heating it at the same temperature for the same time.

There are two main ways to achieve this objective; juicing high-THC strains or consuming an edible made from hemp derived CBD. We’ve written the guide to juicing cannabis here – all you need is some fresh plant material. If you don’t have access to raw cannabis plants, we suggest a high-CBD edible like the Full Spectrum Tinctures or Gel Caps from Ambary Gardens. These products are created using a very similar process to the one outlined above, only with hemp as opposed to high-THC cannabis. They even utilize MCT coconut oil for increased bioavailability – simply put, Ambary makes the best CBD-rich edibles on the market and they can ship to all 50 states.
“Oh, yeah. There’s a lot more shit weed than there is high-quality cannabis.”The edible portion of the evening commenced. In the dining room, the conversation turned, inevitably, to the subject of the Times columnist Maureen Dowd, who, in 2014, shortly after the first licensed cannabis retailers opened for business, travelled to Denver and bought a cannabis chocolate bar. Back in her hotel room, she ate part of the bar, and then, when she felt nothing, ate some more. She described what happened next in that week’s column:
While historians have found recipes involving weed dating back to 15th century Europe and even 10th century India, pot brownies were introduced to pop (or should we say “pot”?) culture in the 1968 movie “I Love You Alice B. Toklas.” Objectively, the most common way to make weed-laced snacks is marijuana butter, but baking with cannabis oil can be even more effective. While these two products have many similar uses and come from the same plant, they’re produced and used in very different ways.
Now, removed the cakes from the muffin pan and let them cool. Once they’ve cooled off, you can start frosting them. Stack whichever colors you want in any way. Frost each layer so that they stick together. If you need to, stick it with a toothpick. The ones I made were a huge mess. Delicious. But a mess. When cut in half, these little surprises will impress all of your friends, especially if you’ve added bud to them! And as always, you can add however much or however little weed you want to. It all depends on your preference! Enjoy!
All in all, they’re not so different—but they’re definitely not the same. Cannabis oil can be used to make marijuana butter, but not all marijuana butter is made from cannabis oil. While nearly anyone with cooking experience can make marijuana-infused oil or butter, making cannabis oil should be left to the chemists, and while weed and cannabis oil are mostly readily available in legal states, pre-made marijuana butter can be hard to find—leaving both legal residents and those getting their bud on the black market in the same boat: making it at home.

In the spirit of St Patrick’s Day, making everything that we eat/use/interact with green is kind of part of the holiday. What better way to wake up on a holiday like this then with a medicated breakfast of green eggs and ham? The following recipe will not only give you weed infused eggs and ham but they’re actually green as well, making them the perfect breakfast for a festive stoner.
Laurie Wolf is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, a food writer, and a life-long professional recipe developer. She has more than 20 years of experience writing recipes for countless magazines, companies, blogs, and websites, including New York magazine, Vogue, Self, Working Woman, American Health, Fitness, Glamour, and many more. She has written recipes for TheWeedBlog.com and TheStonersCookbook.com, also writes recipes and blogs for CannabisNowMagazine.com and TheCannabist.co, the blog for the marijuana section of the Denver Post (the first national newspaper to publish a section devoted to the topic). Through her company Laurie & Maryjane (LaurieandMaryjane.com), Laurie develops and sells sweet and savory products that incorporate medical marijuana to dispensaries around Portland, Oregon.

In regard to health, there are federal standards in the Occupational Safety and Health Guideline for permissible workplace exposure for n-butane. The recommendation is no more than “800 parts per million as an eight hour time weighted average.”  Although you’re probably not blasting butane for 8 hours at a time, it is important to know how to be safe around this gas. Butane exposure toxicity includes temporary and long-lasting symptoms like hallucinations, irritability, social withdrawal and central nervous system damage, according to the same federal report. Limit your exposure and be smart.
Just some of the cannabis culinary techniques you will learn include the correct cannabis oil breakdown, decarboxylation, the benefits of infused butter versus oil, how to store your infusion, and how to make cannabis calculations when cooking. Each week offers appetizers, entrees, and desserts. My 420 Tours provides portioned ingredients and you can take your freshly-made goodies to go!
Tincture is a great way to alleviate any sort of body pain. It is fast acting and easy to take whenever and where ever. Finding recipes to make this stuff is pretty difficult, especially if you’re looking to avoid making it with alcohol, as most do. While the alcohol method is easy, it takes a good amount of time and can be a problem for people with low alcohol tolerance and sensitive stomachs. A good alternative to this is glycerin, which is pretty much just sugar. It’s sweet and can be taken by itself. Plus you can still drive while taking it, something that isn’t recommended with the alcohol based tincture.
Hey i just tried the oil in the crockpot method, turned out to what seems like good oil ( have done stove top in past) i tried two teaspoons in a small amount of water for a potency test but havent had any real results ( used about 2 1/2 cups of trimmings and small buds to 1 cup oil) im just curious is that possible to the way ive ingested it? Would baking into something and trying that be a better “strength” test? Thanks!
Ice extracts are a much safer way to obtain highly concentrated THC, rather than the “easier” butane method. Ice hash is clean and earthy, definitely something every stoner should try at some point. It’s not as difficult to make as some people think. Here’s a step by step tutorial on how to make ice hash yourself and get a good yield of some serious fire.
Hi, Congratulations on making your first batch! The short answer is yes, you need a double boiler. I will tell you that coconut oil on the double boiler is not the simplest method. It does require you to watch the infusion that it does not get too hot or too thick, as moisture will escape during the process, thickening your infusion. Also be certain to not let the water boil off in the bottom vessel. A candy thermometer will definitely come in handy to ensure your infusion temps stay below 180 degrees (I like 140 or so). Personally, I recommend using a crock pot or slow cooker. You don’t have to watch it all the time like you do with a double boiler and you can be sure your temps will not get too high. I go over both these methods in detail in my Cannabis Cooking For Home Cooks course. You should check it out.
“Bulletproof coffee”, coffee with unsalted butter or coconut oil in place of cream or milk, has exploded in popularity over the past few years. It’s a staple in paleo and keto diets and many vegans enjoy the coconut oil version. Of course, mixing in cannabutter or cannabis coconut oil is a great way to get the perceived benefits of bulletproof coffee along with a healthy dose of THC. Stir into your favorite brew, or put it in the blender for a frothy morning drink.
Using oils under the tongue (holding it there for a minute to let them sink in) will provide the quickest effects, but most will still only kick in from 1-2 hours from the time you take it – and can last for as long as 6-10 hours in some cases. The initial onset and duration of cannabis oil is much longer than vaping or smoking because it’s absorbed through the digestive system and bloodstream, and it’s not recommended to take a second dose (whether edible or sublingual) until 4 solid hours have gone by.
Wolf pulled a Mason jar of infused olive oil from a shelf and encouraged me to smell it. It had a powerfully green scent. “Olive oil infuses beautifully,” she said. “It’s very earthy.” A jar of infused canola oil, on the other hand, smelled like bong water. Wolf had used the infused olive oil to make the stuffed mushrooms as well as a spinach tart. Those who wanted even more weed could slather their food with an infused feta sauce made with olive oil, garlic, parsley, and red onion. “Strong flavors help conceal the taste,” Wolf said. “It is a challenge to keep the foods from tasting like cannabis. That’s probably the hardest thing about making edibles.” Dessert was a “mildly infused” strawberry trifle in a big glass bowl. For palate cleansers, there were frozen grapes—an old standby for Wolf. “They’re wonderful when people get stoned,” she explained.
Disclaimer: Our products have intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of cannabis infused products. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.
Because alcohol extractions are typically used for tinctures, we will focus on fat based extractions for traditional edibles. For increased bioavailability, we suggest using coconut oil, which is high in medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). The reason being that MCTs are small, and easily digested relative to the long chain triglycerides (LCTs) found in most fatty foods (olive oil, canola oil or butter). Unlike other types of fats, MCTs don’t need to be broken down before they’re used for energy, and they don’t require any extra energy to digest or absorb. This makes the use of coconut oil especially helpful for those who suffer from impaired fat digestion and gallbladder issues. Note the MCT oil, which is comprised of 100% MCTs, can also be used.
There are other things that you can add in to this recipe, depending on how you like your caramel. It’s possible to coat the candies with salt or even add dried fruit in to the mixture when making in order to add some extra flavor to your treats. Halloween is coming faster than most people realize so if you’re having a party, these treats are going to be a hit!
We recommend slightly amending your decarb time based on the moisture levels in the starting material; very dry material will need less time and fresher material will need significantly more time (it needs to dry and then decarb). In our experience, it is better to overdo the decarb than to come up short and not fully activate your cannabinoids. For reference, if you continue to decarb once all of the THCa has converted to THC, it will begin to convert to CBN, the strongest sedative of the known cannabinoids. Accordingly, if you desire sleep-inducing edibles, you should leave the tray of material in the oven longer than is suggested on this chart. The length of additional time will impact the ratio of THC to CBN in the edibles.

*Note that the total amount of cannabis oil will vary by individual. Optimal dose is determined through guidance from a qualified healthcare professional. If the infused oil is particularly strong, start with half of the recommended dose and increase the amount slowly. Always consult your physician should you have any questions when baking your own cannabis edibles. Keep these muffins safely out of reach of children, pets or anyone else who should not be using them. Make sure that they are properly marked and stored away securely. When baking with cannabis, remember to always start low and go slow.
The first step is to decarboxylate your flower. Ideally, do not grind it but rather break it up into popcorn sized nugs, but it is fine to use shake or ground bud as well. Throw your cannabis right in your decarboxylator (putting it in silicon or a shot glass if you’re using kief/concentrates) and let it run its cycle while you gather your ingredients.

The first step is to decarboxylate your flower. Ideally, do not grind it but rather break it up into popcorn sized nugs, but it is fine to use shake or ground bud as well. Throw your cannabis right in your decarboxylator (putting it in silicon or a shot glass if you’re using kief/concentrates) and let it run its cycle while you gather your ingredients.
Process:In a small mason jar mix in 1 gram High CBD Hash Oil to 3 fl. oz. of high-proof alcohol. Seal lid on the jar and shake vigorously. Place mixture into freezer. Leave for a minimum of 5 days shaking the jar twice daily and placing back in the freezer. Using a coffee filter and a separate container, strain the liquid removing any impurities (there should be very little solids). Pour the tincture into the 1 fl. oz.  eyedroppers.
The hash oil you purchased has very high concentrations of CBD, or cannabidiol which, as a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, has demonstrated health benefits as a nutritional antioxidant, neuroprotector, and anti-inflammatory supplement. CBD attaches to receptors associated exclusively with inflammation and not receptors associated with euphoria. Thus, CBD does not get users “high”.
To smoke hash oil with a spliff, add the hash oil when rolling on top of the herbal weed.  This is a good way to add a kick to cheap pot.  It may take some practice to get it smoking properly.  It’s also possible to add on top of the weed in a bowl.  Dab it on to the side of the bowl to avoid it saturating the intake, but not too close to the side as to miss the weed, as pure oil is more likely to catch fire.  You want it between the intake and the bowl edge, on top of the weed.
Since I generally like to take microdoses of cannabis (about 10mg or less) throughout the day when I need to medicate, I’ve never really delved into the world of making ridiculously strong cannabis oil or butter. I realize that some people need stronger medicine, but those people aren’t me, and I don’t have the tolerance to test strong oil without getting really really really messed up, so I never did it.
First, as always, preheat your oven to 350 degrees and be sure to put a center rack in the oven. Grease a 10x3in Bundt pan and sprinkle flour all over it. This will prevent the cake from sticking to the inside of the pan once it’s finished. You don’t want the cake to get stuck. It’ll make a mess and you will ruin your cake. It is also important that you leave all of your ingredients sitting out at room temp for at least 40 minutes before you start baking. This includes the eggs, buttermilk, and butter.
When you do this, you need to make sure that the butter never boils. By keeping it at a low simmer, you extract more THC from the material than if you boil it. I usually leave my butter on the stove for 7 minutes, until the kitchen smells almost like almonds. It’s a weird smell but I have a knack for cooking with weed and I’m telling you, buttery weed on the stove smells like almonds. Add the butter and bud to your cake mix. You can strain it with a coffee filter if you feel that your grinder didn’t do the whole job.

All cannabis oil packaging must also state the percentage of THC and CBD in the oil (so you know how potent and psychotropic it is before you use it). Just like strains of dried cannabis, oils can have stronger concentrations of CBD, THC, or be more balanced, and thus create very different experiences. Not all oils are created equal – so reading the packaging is crucial for your first time. 
You also need to understand the quantity and how to deal with it when making edibles. For example, let's say you're doing a simple boxed brownie recipe that calls for a third of a cup of oil. A quick fix would be just replacing that with a third of a cup of canna-oil. However, if you do that and you don't understand the potency of that oil, you can't say how many milligrams of THC are in each brownie—you might actually overmedicate that brownie.
In the early days, Wolf tried selling baklava at Oregon dispensaries, which baffled the medical-stoner crowd. “We were catering to the lowest element of pot smokers,” Wolf said. Since then, the audience has changed: sophisticated consumers are known today as “cannasseurs.” They appreciate savory foods, not only because savories avoid cliché—“everybody infuses desserts,” Wolf said—but also because many medical-marijuana users are diabetic, or avoiding sugar for other reasons. Wolf recommends having a bottle of infused salad dressing or pesto on hand. “Infusing a pesto is so easy,” she said. “You can make a bunch and toss it with noodles, and you’ve got a delicious meal.”
Funny is relative. Funny rotten, throw it out. Funny like weed strain and use. Did you use water, if so this would increase chances of something growing that you don’t want in there. If it is just oil and cannabis and the cannabis in submerged, you might be OK. If you stored it in the fridge, you should be fine either way. I could not tell for sure unless I saw and smelled it. But when in doubt, my motto is always to toss it out. Sorry.
While your methods are not the ones I use or teach, there are many methods and if what you are doing works for you, who am I to argue? For me, I do not infuse over direct heat (preferring to use a slow cooker or double boiler) as it is easy for things to get too hot and I have heard from many readers who ruined a good batch of weed. Of course, if you are careful it can be done.
The hard crunchy texture of paunut brittle is like candy and great for continuous munching throughout the day. The peanuts mixed with the cannabis can also act as a brain booster and wouldn’t be a bad idea for a snack if you’ve got some thinking planned somewhere in your day. This is one of those high treats that’s so easy to keep eating and before you know it you’ve got this beautiful buzz going on, some pretty amazing brittle. Learn How to Make Marijuana Peanut Brittle!

Process:In a small mason jar mix in 1 gram High CBD Hash Oil to 3 fl. oz. of high-proof alcohol. Seal lid on the jar and shake vigorously. Place mixture into freezer. Leave for a minimum of 5 days shaking the jar twice daily and placing back in the freezer. Using a coffee filter and a separate container, strain the liquid removing any impurities (there should be very little solids). Pour the tincture into the 1 fl. oz.  eyedroppers.
It seems like there’s a Marley family member in every branch of the weed industry, and food is no exception. Bob’s eldest daughter, Cedella, is the author of “Cooking with Herb,” a cookbook focused on how the health benefits of cannabis can benefit a holistic lifestyle, whether it’s eaten or consumed in some other way. True to the family’s Jamaican roots, the book is full of Caribbean recipes for dishes like saltfish, jerk chicken and spicy Jamaican patties. But it’s not just a cookbook; Cedella’s volume also features wellness tips and directions for making your own beauty products.
In addition to infusing butter and oil with bud, you can infuse it with kief for a very potent infusion. If you’re not familiar with kief, it’s the sticky bits of resin you see on buds. It has a high concentration of cannabinoids but when cooked, it doesn’t impart the cannabis flavor like using the whole flower. In addition, kief butter needs an even quicker infusion and you don’t need to strain plant matter out of your finished product. Again, because of the high concentration of cannabinoids in kief, this makes a very potent oil so start small with your dosage.
These milled cannabis blend are a fused combination of our high-quality strains, available in three distinct varieties: sativa, indica and hybrid. Each Maker’s Mix blend is already pre-milled into small pieces and decarboxylated. This means when you want to make your own edibles or cannabis-infused topicals, much of the work is already done for you. Instead of having to grind, bake and cool your medical cannabis flower, simply use our Maker’s Mix and you’re ready to start.
Regrind the unground parts. The unground parts left in your strainer need to be reprocessed. If you have a coffee grinder, send them through a second time. If you are not getting the result you hoped for or if you started with a food processor, move the unground parts to a mortar and pestle. Apply pressure with the mortar and "stir" the unground parts to produce the necessary grinding action.
Alternately, you can do your straining through cheesecloth. Use multiple layers for more filtration. Put your cheesecloth over the top of a large mixing bowl. Secure the sides with a rubber band. Pour the mixture into the bowl. If you can get cheesecloth, this method is often preferred because you can filter more at a time than you can with a coffee strainer.
As to “mud” I would have had to see it to be sure what the cause is. Was there dirt or roots in the mix? Actual dirt should be gently washed off – gently you don’t want to remove trichomes. If not, it sounds like maybe the plant material was too finely ground. I know a lot cooks recommend grinding the plants finely (and the Magic Butter Machine does it automatically). But I have found it is better to just rough grind as if you were rolling a joint, or even just crumble the plant material with your fingers. What you are trying to extract is ON the plant, not within it, and I find that over grinding just adds extra plant material and green taste to the final product.
Marijuana-infused edibles are an enduring classic in the world of cannabis; especially popular among those who need a smokeless option for consumption. Since PA state law only allows production and sale of cannabis oils at this time, we receive many inquiries about cooking edibles with concentrates. In addition to state law limitations, determining your dosage can also be challenging when baking with cannabis flower, whereas with concentrates it can be measure a lot more accurately.
Put the water, marijuana, and butter into a large pot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and let simmer up to five hours. Turn heat off and run the mixture through a fine metal strainer or cheesecloth into a bowl. Squeeze cheesecloth to remove whatever butter you can from the marijuana. Discard the weed when you’re done. Put the bowl of hot water and butter in the fridge or freezer. When the butter hardens, dump out the water, microwave the butter a bit, and then transfer to a Tupperware container. The butter will keep for several weeks.

The Bitchin’ Kitchen’s tenants represented a cross-section of this world. There was a businessman who had raised venture-capital funds to start a candy operation, and a married couple from Ohio who had saved their money and moved to Oregon to start a strain-specific cookie company called Titan’s Kind. Then there was the facility’s owner, a no-nonsense middle-aged woman named Nancy Jones, who started out as a living-room farmer with six plants. “I’ve been growing for nineteen years,” she told me. She is now involved in several enterprises, including Badass Dabs, which makes concentrates and extracts. She handed me a sample of her newest product: a vaginal suppository, which treats pain from menstrual cramps or endometriosis. It looked like a large vitamin. “It’s fifty milligrams of THC, seven milligrams of CBD, and coconut oil and beeswax. All organic,” she said.
“When a person eats marijuana product they may not feel anything for a while,” says Dr. Igor Grant, director of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California, San Diego. “And if they were doing it medicinally, they may say, ‘Well, maybe I didn’t have enough,’ and take some more, and then two hours later they’re very, very stoned.”
The infamous weed brownie is infamous for a reason and incorporates two of the best things on the planet; brownies and weed. Brownies are a perfect baked good to share with friends and when you serve these they’ll be knocking down your door to get another taste of your bud brownies. Once you’ve whipped up a batch of these goodies, you might not be able to go back to regular box mix brownies again.

Fresh vibrant veggies with a bit of spice and heat means tasty salsa. There are so many combinations you can put together, this being one of the greater ones. The high of this dish really seems to pop out at you in the presence of all the loud flavors. Salsa is really one of those breakfast, lunch, or dinner type eats, and even more so when you put put a little reefer in to wake you up.

First, take the bud and put it in the coffee grinder, turning it in to a powder. Don’t try to put all of it in at once. Grinding about 7 grams at a time usually works pretty well. Once all of the marijuana is ground up, carefully pour it in. Use a funnel of some sort to make sure that you get all of it. Then, take about 7-8 ice cubes and place them on a washcloth. Fold the top of the washcloth over and hit the cubes with the rubber mallet until they’re almost powder. Pour that in to the milk jug as well. Next, add cold water to the jug, bringing the level of the substance 3/4″ of an inch above where the marijuana level was.
Terpenes are aroma and flavor compounds found in all kinds of plant foods, such as cinnamon, oregano, and lemons. Cannabis shares certain terpenes with mangoes, black pepper, and rosemary, and different strains of cannabis have different terpenes. It’s not unusual for cannabis sold in dispensaries to come with tasting notes, like a glass of wine, and a company in Amsterdam even has a detailed “flavor wheel” of available strains with flavors as specific as “Tabasco” and “bread fruit.” Sayegh and others believe terpenes, like cannabinoids, shape the high and have therapeutic benefits—from calming to euphoric—and will pick and choose strains based on that. Some studies have supported this direct connection between flavor and effect, but, as with many aspects of cannabis, research has been limited by the plant’s legal status.
The first thing you must do if cooking with cannabis is to activate the THC and/or CBD. And that requires heat. The process you will use to do this is called decarboxylation. This is what will give your edibles the “buzz” you want. Beyond that, however, raw cannabis placed directly into recipes will not allow the range of cannabinoids found in the plant to activate and bind to fat. You will just be wasting cannabis, in other words. And who wants that?
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