Cannabis Now contributor Laurie Wolf sells small batch cheese crisps and brownie bites at Oregon dispensaries. But if you’re not in the state, her cookbook will help you replicate those treats — and tons of others — at home. With elevated recipes for dishes like a tomahawk ribeye and bruschetta with ricotta and peas, this is the book you should turn to if you’re prepping an elegant dinner party. In fact, “Herb” has been called the “the authoritative volume on how to cook with cannabis” by celebrity chef Michael Ruhlman — who won a James Beard Award for his own book — so you know it’s good.
Extracts, or concentrates, are exactly what they sound like—products with high levels of THC that are made from cannabis by a number of methods, from sifting buds to isolate cannabinoid-rich trichomes,to supercritical CO2 extraction, which uses carbon dioxide at very high pressures to pull cannabinoids from the plant. (This professional technique is a popular way to decaffeinate coffee.) There is a dizzying array of extracts available, as well as ways to consume them, from vaporizing to smoking them atop traditional bud. And some have found their way into the kitchen.
Marijuana butter and cannabis-infused oil can be ingested in a variety of ways. Once you’ve created the product, it can be used as a cooking ingredient for any recipe—minding that most baked goods work best with butter. However, one thing to consider is the temperature of the dish you’re preparing—heating the marijuana butter or oil to temperatures exceeding 245 degrees Fahrenheit will burn the THC. For a more simple application, the butter can be used as a spread on toast or even just dosed orally by itself. Some choose cannabis-infused oil as a medicinal ingredient in topical salves, lotions, and ointment, as it can be absorbed through the skin once it has gone through the decarboxylation process.
After you’ve mixed the cake batter, divvy it up between the six empty containers. Now, add the food coloring. Since the coloring only comes in four colors, you’ll have to make orange and purple. I only used six colors but I was also more interested in making the Rasta colors rather than the rainbow. So make your colors, and make sure to mix them together well. You can change the way the colors look by adding more or less of the coloring. Don’t add too much or you’ll end up with some hockey pucks because the colors don’t look very colorful if you add too much.
My issue is how INCONSISTENT my brownies have been. In the last 4-5 years I’ve made 8-10 batches of brownies, mostly done the same way (except once with a slow cooker and once i included a 40 minute oven decarb step vis a vis laurie wolf/the cannabist recipe) that have ranged from completely catatonic and narcotic, like debilitating. People with little to no tolerance have vomited from eating half of one. I smoke every day, including extracts and flower, for about 12 years and even i’ve been completely Fuzzed out to the point where i sleep and then wake up and i’m still FUZZED OUT! However, I’ve also made brownies that were totally delicious but completely sucked.

As we discussed earlier, kief and hash can range from dry and crumbly to sticky and gummy.  Many smokers prefer the latter, but for cooking purposes, the dry, crumbly, powdery stuff is often easiest to work with because it is easy to grind which then allows you to stir the fine powder into all kinds of foods, something impossible to do with the gummy type of hash.  If you plan on dissolving the hash in a hot liquid, however, either type will work fine. Learn more about dealing with the various consistencies of hash and kief at this link.
For decarbing I would not recommend a large skillet like that as I doubt the temperature is consistent throughout and it is not meant for baking – you would have a hot spot under the dish, it might work, but I can’t see it’s your best option. I think a small well made toaster oven, with oven thermometer would be a better choice for someone on a budget.

 Now for the spice! Add the canna-oil, salt, ground pepper, Lawry’s seasoned salt, and last but not least, garlic powder. Then cut both the lemon and lime in half and squeeze one half of the lime and lemon in to the guac. Mix everything together, grab your favorite tortilla chips and look at your masterpice! Now all there’s left to do is dip, bite, and get high.
Cannabis-infused salves and topicals deliver quick pain relief and a feeling of relaxation to your muscles, without any psychoactive effects. Coconut oil infusions are a good choice for creating your own pain salves because coconut oil is a great transporter of CBD from your skin into your body’s cannabinoid receptors. Better CBD absorption means more relief for sore muscles, arthritis, and other localized pains. It also becomes as easy as adding your infused coconut oil into a non-cannabis product you already own and love!

 Using a piece of paper, make a funnel so that the process of pouring the marijunana in the olive-oil goes smooth and you don’t spill or waste any herb. Begin pouring the ground reefer into your funnel. Something like a toothpick would be a good tool to help guide the MJ down the funnel. The amount of weed you use will determine the potency of the oil, so go for the gusto.


For example, if you are planning to prepare 30 cookies with your full gram of wax that has 65% (650 mg) THC, then you’ll simply divide 650mg by 30, yielding 21.7mg (approx.. 22mg) per each cookie—which is a little higher than what some states allow for sale. This is a high amount for inexperienced users. If you’re not entirely sure, it is a good idea to start on the low end and mix in less, or even half of your concentrate until you arrive at a comfortable euphoria.

Place egg yolks, remaining 1/4 cup sugar, and salt in a small bowl and whisk until egg yolks are thick and pale yellow.  Whisking vigorously to prevent the eggs from scrambling, whisk in about 1/2 cup of the warm milk mixture.  Continue whisking in milk mixture, about 1/2 cup at a time until it is all incorporated..  Return to heat and cook over medium low stirring constantly, until it starts to thicken.  Do not boil, mixture should only reach about 185 degrees F (if you have a thermometer, if not heat until very hot).  Remove from heat, place in a bowl, cover and chill in the refrigerator until very cold, at least 6 hours.

"The Easy Cannabis Cookbook is a critical resource to understand, in simple terms, the history and the science behind cannabis and the way we are hard wired to interact with it. Perhaps, more importantly, it is also a practical guide on how to safely incorporate phytocannabinoids nutritionally into the human diet the way evolution has decided it should be."―Dr. Lakisha Jenkins, Traditional Naturopath, Registered Master Herbalist
With summer fast approaching, people are beginning to get prepared for backyard barbecues and trying to look killer in a bathing suit. So while we do understand that candies and confections make great edibles, not everyone wants to mow down on brownies right before beach season. But what if you want to be healthy and get stoned at the same time? Easy enough with this simple recipe for grilled peach cannabis salad. This dish will be perfect for a get together with friends or something to make and store for lunches throughout the week. The recipe comes from Roxanne Dennant at Fruit Slabs, a vegan fruit-leather that’s made for healthy people on the go. The salad, while spicy, remains sweet with the taste of summer.
Cooking with kief is a joy. Its fine texture allows it dissolve almost instantly in warm (and sometimes even cold) liquids and other ingredients like mayonnaise, yogurt, sour cream and more. Hash can be a little trickier. It can come in many textures from dry and crumbly to sticky and putty-like. Dry hash can be sent through a small food processor or coffee grinder to turn it into a fine powder. You can even use a mortar and pestle for this. The sticky variety is best heated in a liquid until it dissolves. Even so, hash can sometimes leave a slight gritty texture, which is why when given the choice, I choose kief. Learn more about cooking with hash and kief here.
Unless you are working with a cannabis concentrate (like CO2 oil) that is labeled ‘activated’, you will need decarboxylate your starting material to maximize the effect of your edibles. To do so, we recommend preheating your over to approximately 220-225°F. It helps to use an oven thermometer to check the accuracy of your oven; ours ran nearly 20 degrees hotter than it was set! The specific temperature will dictate how long it takes for your starting material to decarboxylate. As you can see on the chart below, it will likely take between 45 and 60 minutes to fully decarb your material at this temperature. If using a different temperature, be sure to adjust your oven time accordingly!
If you’ve experimented with other forms of cannabis before, your sensitivity to THC is a key factor in what kind of oil to choose. If you enjoy the typical “high”, picking a THC-rich oil would kick that up a notch, whereas oils with higher concentrations of CBD often have reduced THC values and therefore feel more toned down. It’s recommended that most people start with a CBD-rich oil or an evenly balanced CBD-THC oil, observe, and then gradually increase the amount of THC. 
*Note that the total amount of cannabis oil will vary by individual. Optimal dose is determined through guidance from a qualified healthcare professional. If the infused oil is particularly strong, start with half of the recommended dose and increase the amount slowly. Always consult your physician should you have any questions when baking your own cannabis edibles. Keep these muffins safely out of reach of children, pets or anyone else who should not be using them. Make sure that they are properly marked and stored away securely. When baking with cannabis, remember to always start low and go slow.
As far as straining, I use a spatter screen (normally used over frying pans to stop spatter, they have a much finer weave than a strainer or screen colander). Just put it over the top of a pan and pour. Easiest way I’ve found and I lose way less oil than using any kind of fabric. After it stops dribbling, I press it, then pour boiling water through it and let drain then press again. Of course, anyone can rinse it as many times as they want, but one additional drain this way usually ends up with very little oil in the drained liquid, so I only do the one. I heat the water and oil again on a low heat, only up to a low boil, which mixes the oils, then shut it off and let it cool, gently transfer to fridge. When it is solid, lift it off the water and I have a translucent butter, very little color, almost no plant material because it settles, along with any other solids, on the bottom of the pan. If, by some chance, it comes out dark with material, it can be put in a half-gallon or so of water and heated again to a low boil, then shut off and left to settle and cool once more. Fridge it, when it’s solid, even cleaner butter.
With an easy and more precise dosage method, medical cannabis oils are ideal for oral consumption. However, they can be just as effortlessly added to what you’re eating. Because our extraction process includes decarboxylation, there is no need to decarb the oil on your own before cooking like you have to with dried flower. This means you can just add the oil to basically anything without any fuss or extra time. To add your oil into a food, simply measure your dosage as you normally would do with the syringe and add that specific amount to your recipe. If you’re cooking for one, you only need one dose. If you’re making a large batch, multiple your single dose by how many servings you are creating. (For example, if you’re making a dozen brownies you’ll want to add twelve times your single-use dose.) Ensure you mix thoroughly to distribute your medical cannabis evenly throughout your recipe.
Wolf’s mixed nuts have had a lot of traction. She adapted them from a Danny Meyer recipe and added infused coconut oil, a staple in her kitchen because it can also be used topically, “so you’re getting more bang for your buck.” (An elderly friend of Wolf’s rubs it on his hands to treat his rheumatoid arthritis.) Wolf’s newest book, “Cooking with Cannabis,” emphasizes comfort foods like mac and cheese and meatloaf. There’s a chapter called “Recipes for One,” intended for solo eaters. “It’s great to be able to make yourself ramen,” she said. (The cannabis goes in the broth, mixed with sesame oil.)
All you have to do to get your medicated mayo is whisk together the egg yolks, the salt, vinegar, lemon juice, and mustard together. Make sure it’s mixed up well. Slowly add in the cannabis oil while still whisking the mixture. Do this carefully or risk making a huge mess. Once the oil is completely added in, continue to whisk the mixture until is begins to thicken. If it gets too thick, you can add a few drops of water to get the right consistency. Put the mayo in an airtight container and let it chill in the refrigerator for about two hours.

It’s 2 sticks, so 8 ounces, a little less because some of it isn’t going to come off the weed. Try about 2-3 grams initially and work up or down from there. If it’s not strong enough, throw more weed in it next time. You can also run it through again with more weed to make it stronger. I did it once 3 times, using altogether about an ounce of weed, and a gram of it made my wife and I hallucinate so hard we had to take a cab home from the bar, 15 minutes after we got there. Don’t do that.
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