That evening’s festivities were business, of a kind. Dope, a “cannabis lifestyle” magazine, was hosting its annual Oregon Dope Cup in Portland. The event is one of many that aspire to be the Oscars of the legal-cannabis industry. Laurie & MaryJane had won a Best Edible trophy at the previous Dope Cup, in Seattle, for its savory nuts. Last year, the company agreed to host an edibles dinner for the magazine’s guests, including the cup’s judges, who had flown in from Colorado.
Even though Memorial Day has passed in the States, the barbecues aren’t quite over yet! The 4th of July has yet to happen and there are plenty of weekends left with beautiful weather! Looking to spice up your usually normal barbecue with some cannabis fun? This recipe will teach you how to infuse your BBQ sauce with cannabis, not only giving you a great sauce but also an awesome way to medicate this summer.
I am a teetotaler, I don't drink, smoke or do drugs, but I also have no problem with other people doing whatever they want with their own bodies. I also consider myself to be a fairly competent chef, and combined with the fact that this book was only $3, I thought it might be an interesting read. Additionally, my grandfather died from wasting syndrome secondary to pulmonary fibrosis; had medical marijuana been available he probably would have lived several years longer and I'd have likely needed to learn how to prepare medicinal edibles.

Many people know to decarboxylate cannabis in the oven first, but it’s worth noting here for anyone who doesn’t know or doesn’t see the point in doing so. You can skip this step and add your raw cannabis to the slow cooker to decarb in the oil, but you might find that this longer oil soak simply worsens the taste of your cannabis oil. It’s also more difficult to control the temperature in a slow cooker and you risk burning off essential cannabinoids, but in an oven, you can set the temperature low and keep it steady.
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