These treats make a great party favor or possibly just something for a hot summer night. Making delicious edibles is also a great way to impress your friends. A good marijuana cook can make the best dishes “special”. Your friends are sure to always come to you if they want some dank goodies. Who knows, if you’re good enough at baking them, maybe you can start your own edibles business! Not only are edibles a strong high, they’re a great way to medicate for patients that can’t smoke.

5. Refrigerate the amber liquid overnight. The butter will rise to the top and become firm again. Scoop the butter from the top, and voila! Your Cannabutter is ready to use in any of your favorite recipes as a butter or oil substitute. Keep the remaining amber liquid to cook with, as it will contain residual THC. Use it in sauces or to boil noodles – the sky’s the limit.
I am a teetotaler, I don't drink, smoke or do drugs, but I also have no problem with other people doing whatever they want with their own bodies. I also consider myself to be a fairly competent chef, and combined with the fact that this book was only $3, I thought it might be an interesting read. Additionally, my grandfather died from wasting syndrome secondary to pulmonary fibrosis; had medical marijuana been available he probably would have lived several years longer and I'd have likely needed to learn how to prepare medicinal edibles.
As to how much bud to use, that depends on how strong you want the oil. The recipes on this site use 1/2 ounce (14 grams) per one cup of oil or butter. That said, when cooking for myself, I use double that amount. I have a high tolerance, but even for those who are “lightweights” making stronger infusions allows you to use less of them in order to get the same dose. Less infusion in the finished recipe means better flavor. If you haven’t already, my free online Dosing class at http://www.Cannademy.com can help you fine tune and adjust your recipes for what you need. If you are unsure of how much you need, please see this article to determine your ideal dose, because everyone is different and not just a little different.

OK, this one isn’t a mistake as there is more than one way to infuse.  Some people do not like to add water to the mix, but I do.  Especially on the stovetop, the water will help things infuse at a lower temperature and avoid things burning and scorching which will result in unappetizing taste and THC that’s rendered useless by being cooked at too high a temperature. The water also helps with appearance and flavor by washing away some of the green color and strong herbal flavor.  The photo at the right shows marijuana butter made with and without water in the mix and marijuana oil made with and without water.  The same type and amount of marijuana was used for each of the infusions in the exact same amount. In all instances there was a better final yield when using water, and a lighter color and less herbal flavor.  The amount of water is not important, but I always add at least as much water as butter or oil. I do this even when infusing in the slow cooker.  Click to find instructions for how to make marijuana butter and cannabis oil.
There are so many thoughts on how to decarb weed, just trying to figure out the best, most efficient method. Right now I’d like to try baking with the leafy material, no buds. What are your thoughts on the ratio of product to butter, how long to decarb and cook. Keep in mind I have a Magical Butter machine whose basic instructions, for butter, is 160 degrees for 2 hours after decarbing at 250 degrees for 30 minutes. It also specifically recommends not to use water during the butter making process. Generally, I’ve used 1 oz of bud to 2 lbs. of unsalted butter using this process but now I’d like to try leaf. Any suggestions before I get started? Woofy
Moriarty’s book visually demonstrates the “secret” process for creating her magical 10x Cannabutter, which replaces the bitter “grass flavor” with a tasty, nutty butter flavor. The smokin’ hot cook book includes 49 easy-to-prepare, delicious dishes that range from her signature dessert, “Blue Sky Lemon Bars”, to her “Dizzy Bird Turkey with Stuffing” – a perfect dish for festive holiday dinners.
I used to be a biter, but my mom cured me of that. Joking aside, I like the taste of weed butter, and I like the taste of food, but the two don’t work for me. I don’t eat sugar or flour, and anything else I cook isn’t going to be enhanced by the taste of weed. And if you make sweets, you can’t eat anymore when you’re high or you’ll make yourself miserable. Why not just eat the butter, then you can eat as many sweets as you like, and just get fat instead of insanely loaded?
No matter which one you buy, the first 30 or so pages will be the same, offering a beginner’s guide to weed, a dosing guide and recipes for oil and butter, the building blocks of almost every edible. Once the cookbooks lay out the basics, they can get into the good stuff: eggs benedict for breakfast, a New York strip for dinner, and plenty of snacks and cocktails in between. And most of the time, these recipes are good enough to prepare without cannabis.
Montrose, a bearded redhead with glasses and a professorial air, sat down in front of the vaporizer. The marijuana industry, as a former black-market business, still lacks the governing bodies and institutions of, say, the wine world, a situation that the Trichome Institute is hoping to remedy. “Most cannabis cups are just complete, utter bullshit,” Montrose said. “There’s no standard for who’s certified to be doing the judging, what the platform is, and how you quantify cannabis quality.” He and his partners had developed a “sommelier program for cannabis,” to teach people to classify plants by their structures and by compounds that produce fragrance, called terpenes, rather than by strain names. “In each cannabis sample, there are actually sixty to a hundred different types of cannabinoids, two hundred different types of terpenes, and, like, a dozen flavonoids,” he said. “That ratio combination is what makes you feel what you feel.” The institute had created an in-house smartphone app to help grade weed, and the three men had spent the day using it to judge the entries in the Dope Cup competition. “We look at the trichomes, the ripeness, the flush factor, the cola structures, the style, and the stigma,” he said, referring to various biological features of the plant. “All that is done completely sober.”
Cooking with kief is a joy. Its fine texture allows it dissolve almost instantly in warm (and sometimes even cold) liquids and other ingredients like mayonnaise, yogurt, sour cream and more. Hash can be a little trickier. It can come in many textures from dry and crumbly to sticky and putty-like. Dry hash can be sent through a small food processor or coffee grinder to turn it into a fine powder. You can even use a mortar and pestle for this. The sticky variety is best heated in a liquid until it dissolves. Even so, hash can sometimes leave a slight gritty texture, which is why when given the choice, I choose kief. Learn more about cooking with hash and kief here.
“Oh, we will,” Montrose said, explaining that consumption quality would be judged at a later stage, but that it was essential to examine the plants first. “Some of the cannabis we looked at today, it looked, like, out of this world, outrageous, will blow you away. And you put it under the microscope and it’s full of webs and bugs and spiders, fecal matter, exoskeletons!”
Basil traveled from Chicago to attend Feast and signed up for the Sugar High class because he’s “just fascinated by the whole phenomenon of edibles,” he said. He’s never cooked with cannabis before but figured if he came to Portland, a city known for pot, he might be able to pick up a few pointers. A carpenter by trade, Basil has dealt with carpel tunnel problems in both hands for the last few years. 
Before you start baking or cooking, you want to calculate the potency of the edibles you plan on making. It is easy to calculate, especially if you know the THC potency of your concentrate (see above to calculate your total THC). A full gram (1000mg) of concentrate with 65% THC is 650 mg of THC in your wax. In a half gram (500mg) with 65% THC you will have 350mg of THC.
After the liquid forms the thin layer of ice, remove the bowl from the freezer. Don’t let the liquid swish around or you’ll disturb the settled trichomes. Using a turkey baster or something similar, slowly remove the liquid from the bowl. This is a time consuming process because you can’t disturb the settled matter at the bottom. Once the liquid gets down to a very low level, you can use paper towels to help absorb. After you’ve removed the liquid, take a hair dryer to the mixture, carefully drying it. The mixture should get lighter and be about the same color all the way around.
Most people do not like the green herbal flavor of marijuana shining through their foods. Likewise recipes with lots of spices and flavors going on tend to mask this better than delicate and subtle fare. Use as much or a little more seasoning and flavor adding ingredients (such as onion and garlic) when cooking with cannabis than you would if you were cooking without marijuana.
Once the peaches are off of the grill, let them sit for three minutes to cool down and then cut the halves in to smaller pieces and place them on top of the salad. If you have access to the OG Mango Fruit Slab, you can put the pieces on top at this point. If you have opted to use cannabis olive oil, drizzle some over the top of the salad, toss, and serve!

If you’ve ever used a tincture and tried to mix it in a drink, you’ve probably noticed it doesn’t mix all that well. Why? Pot isn’t water soluble; it’s oil soluble. So you’ll do best using a high-fat oil, like coconut oil or canola. You can even use olive oil. Keep in mind, however, that canola has a higher boiling/smoking point than coconut and olive oils.


If there's one message I want to get out there, it's that people need to understand that the typical dose is ten milligrams of THC. If you want to have a good experience, you should aim for that. Buying a 150 milligram brownie doesn't mean you'll have a good time—you most likely will not. Once you understand the basics of dosing, then you can actually have a really enjoyable experience with edibles.
There is no easier way to ingest too much marijuana than by eating it. Sometimes people are impatient and think “it’s not working” and eat more. By the time it all kicks in they have overdone it. While “overdoses” are not dangerous in that they are never fatal, they won’t shut down your organs, they can make you feel anxious, paranoid, and/or disoriented. Dosing edibles is somewhat of an art, a lot of factors need to be taken into consideration and people’s tolerances run a wide range. An amount that one person does not even physically feel might be enough to make someone else experience couch-lock for hours. When cooking with marijuana, especially new plant material you are not familiar with, it’s a good idea to vape or smoke a little to get general idea of its potency.  Keep in mind that cooking can intensify potency somewhat. If you do find a batch of your edibles is more potent than you intended the remedy is easy – eat less! Learn more about dosing when cooking with marijuana at this link.
And here’s a secret, for those of you that live on the west coast, I know how much you appreciate thousand island dressing and you can make your own using this medicated mayo by adding in equal parts of ketchup and relish. You may have to mess around with how much of each you add but once you get the consistency right, you will end up with an amazing medicated condiment that you can pretty much put on anything. You’re welcome!
This 3-year-old cookbook from two classically trained chefs — the pair have degrees from the Culinary Institute of America, Le Cordon Bleu and Johnson and Wales between them — is one of the better books about cannabis cooking. It’s both pragmatic and culinary-minded, and avoids the stoner language that can obfuscate the prose of the genre. The concise “cannabis 101” intro section concludes with good recipes for canna-oil, canna-butter and compound butters made with it — a great and nicely cheffy touch. The recipes focus on well-sourced ingredients and give techniques for components in such a way that you could easily use the book for non-pot cooking. I’d switch out the cannabutter for regular butter and make the triple-chocolate espresso cookies on a regular rotation, and the matcha sugar cookies too.
The first step is to decarboxylate your flower. Ideally, do not grind it but rather break it up into popcorn sized nugs, but it is fine to use shake or ground bud as well. Throw your cannabis right in your decarboxylator (putting it in silicon or a shot glass if you’re using kief/concentrates) and let it run its cycle while you gather your ingredients.
Pour the mixture through the fine strainer, in to a large bowl and discard any solids that are left behind in the strainer. Place this bowl in the fridge and leave it uncovered for an hour, stirring it occasionally. Then, place plastic wrap over the top of the mixture and let it chill for another 12 to 24 hours. After that amount of time has passed, pour the cold mixture in to a 1 1/2 quart ice cream freezer container. Stick it in the freezer for three hours and then stir in the vanilla wafers and the lime juice. Put the container back in the freezer for another six hours or until the mixture has become firm. Let the ice cream stand for five minutes before serving it. Enjoy!
If using whole buds or trim, make sure that the material is ground up relatively fine. We prefer to use a traditional grinder as opposed to a food processor or blender, as they typically pulverize the starting material. If using hash that has greased up or congealed into a sticky ball, attempt to break up the hash into smaller pieces; the goal being to increase the exposed surface area.

After 24 hours, turn the crockpot off. Let it sit for a while and cool off. I waited about 20 minutes. When the glycerin has cooled, put on your gloves and put the cheesecloth over the mouth of the mason jar. I took the circle part of the jar and screwed it back on over the cloth to keep in in place. I also folded the cloth over itself about four or five times to ensure that I strained out all of the leftover marijuana powder.


I’ve smoked for 50 years and I have discovered that including the seeds and stems leads to bad taste and headaches. I would presume that including them in any oil concoction would have the same bad side affects. For myself, I will carefully manicure any weed before I use it in any way. A little great stuff (buds without seeds) is better than a bunch of nasty tasting all-inclusive smoke. IMHO
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