Heat up your grill on low/medium heat and cut your peach in half. Coat the fruit with the cannabis coconut oil that you have and sprinkle cinnamon over the halves. Put a piece of tinfoil on the grill and once it is warm enough, place the peaches on for about five minutes. They should be warm but not too hot. If they get too hot, they will turn to mush so be careful to keep an eye on them. While the peaches are grilling, you can quickly gather the ingredients for the balsamic vinaigrette. Put all of the greens in a large bowl and top it with the blackberries.
No! That would be disastrous. Hash and kief are NOTHING like flour. You can make your regular cookie recipe with the regular amount of flour and simply stir in an appropriate amount of finely ground decarboxylated kief or hash that will give you the dose you are seeking into your batter and bake as usual. But hash and kief are by no means a substitute for flour.

The hash oil you purchased has very high concentrations of CBD, or cannabidiol which, as a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, has demonstrated health benefits as a nutritional antioxidant, neuroprotector, and anti-inflammatory supplement. CBD attaches to receptors associated exclusively with inflammation and not receptors associated with euphoria. Thus, CBD does not get users “high”.
In many states in the US, a single dose of an edible is 10 mg of either THC or CBD – but some medical cannabis products can contain over 100mg of THC. As always, the stronger concentrations are better to work up to slowly, and to work in collaboration with a cannabis-savvy doctor. After testing out a single dose, most medical cannabis patients are recommended to increase in increments of 5 mg until they achieve the desired effects.
If you prefer to use butter next time instead of oil, the preparation is virtually identical, but you’ll want to start out with a single stick of salted butter and you’ll want to simmer it between 8 to 24 hours if using the slow cook method. Use about a quarter to a half ounce of weed per stick of butter. Butters can be great because it can be more versatile than cooking with oil. You can even add butter to your toast!
Adding water is optional not mandatory. I would not reheat with water at this point. Stain the plant material off, if you haven’t already. If there is a lot of sediment in the bottom you can optionally reheat gently over low heat and further strain through a mesh yogurt strainer to further clarify it, but again it is optional. Will it taste too weedy? That is a personal preference but it should likely be OK, especially if you use it in highly seasoned foods that have lots of other flavors going on (a coconut curry perhaps?). Good luck.
Wolf gave me a preview of the meal: marijuana-free chicken Marbella and couscous, paired with infused sides and appetizers. The dishes had been set out on a sideboard. Next to each one was a card with the potency level noted in calligraphy: “Stuffed Mushrooms, 5 mg THC each.” (Five milligrams of tetrahydrocannabinol is about the equivalent of a few puffs from a joint.) The secret to cooking with cannabis is fat. THC, the main psychoactive ingredient, bonds to fat molecules when heated. There are high-tech ways of doing this, but Wolf prefers to do it “the old-fashioned way, with good butter and good oil.” Her cookbooks always begin with recipes for what she calls canna-butter and canna-oil.
Alternately, you can do your straining through cheesecloth. Use multiple layers for more filtration. Put your cheesecloth over the top of a large mixing bowl. Secure the sides with a rubber band. Pour the mixture into the bowl. If you can get cheesecloth, this method is often preferred because you can filter more at a time than you can with a coffee strainer.
In the U.K. I can get 30ml thc oil (unnamed Indica) with 125mg (20%) THC in for £85, or buy 3.5 ounces of 9lb Hammer for around £50. I don’t know if you could hazard a guess as to whether making my own would be more cost effective, but I’m guessing it would be. Chemo fog has rendered me incapable of basic logic skills, but saying that, you’re not my math teacher so don’t worry if you’ve no idea!

Now that we’ve gone over cannabis-infused oils, let’s dive into their similarly monikered cousin: cannabis oil. Similar to olive, vegetable, or coconut oil, cannabis oil is made through a chemical extraction process. There are a variety of methods that the marijuana industry uses to extract oil, resulting in similar but unique products. Most cannabis extraction methods involve a solvent, like butane or CO2—or extreme heat and pressure—to extract the cannabinoids. These processes can be time-consuming and usually involve expensive laboratory equipment. Without proper training and the right tools, extracting THC from weed using certain methods is downright dangerous. Unless you’re using a solventless method, the excess yield—or product that isn’t cannabis oil—needs to be removed in order for a clean, non-toxic final result. For those of us who aren’t chemistry experts, most methods of this process should be left to the professionals.
This delicious Tokyo style dessert snack puts bananas in a league all their own and is sweet in all the right ways. With the added canna-flour, these fried bananas would workd great for medicinal patients who’d like to releive pain and eat good at the same time. It’s pretty simple to prepare and might just have you hooked eating your high fried banana style.
Andrea Drummer is a Los Angeles-based culinary school grad and private chef specializing in cannabis cooking. Maybe because of her culinary training, the book is short on the science of cooking with cannabis and long on recipes, including some fun ones such as kimchi fried rice and escargot in puff pastry. This is both good and bad, as the recipes for infused stock, pasta dough and mayonnaise are comforting for home cooks, but the book doesn’t give much information about how to work with or use cannabis. (There’s also no index, which is frustrating.) Although Drummer gives bud pairings, as if she’s talking about a good Cabernet, decarboxylation isn’t even mentioned; recipes simply call for grams of “cannabis product.” This assumes a lot, and unless you’re already versed in this kind of cooking, you’ll need outside reference in order to use this one properly.

Terpenes are aroma and flavor compounds found in all kinds of plant foods, such as cinnamon, oregano, and lemons. Cannabis shares certain terpenes with mangoes, black pepper, and rosemary, and different strains of cannabis have different terpenes. It’s not unusual for cannabis sold in dispensaries to come with tasting notes, like a glass of wine, and a company in Amsterdam even has a detailed “flavor wheel” of available strains with flavors as specific as “Tabasco” and “bread fruit.” Sayegh and others believe terpenes, like cannabinoids, shape the high and have therapeutic benefits—from calming to euphoric—and will pick and choose strains based on that. Some studies have supported this direct connection between flavor and effect, but, as with many aspects of cannabis, research has been limited by the plant’s legal status.
Hello from the Yukon Territory. I’m a senior citizen and relatively new to this edibles game. I’ve started growing my own, outdoors, without too much fanfare. My plants (about 1/2 doz) make a few buds, that are far from high quality. All I do is dry my plants, grind them up in a food processor till close to the consistency of flour, and make small cookies. I use a half teaspoon for measuring the batter–cute little green ovals. My niece and I call them “beetles”. I’m happy with the buzz I get, and it helps with a few aches and pains I get from my senior age, but reading here and elsewhere, I see there is a lot more to the science behind it all. I’m also realizing that a lot of you may find it perhaps crude that I just cook with the pot the way I do, but I’m happy with the simplicity, and will probably continue with this method. However, do I deduce correctly, that my finished product will be better if I heat my dried and ground pot first in the oven, for 20 minutes at 250 degrees, before I make my beetles?
All of this has produced a new category of cannabis user: people trying it for the first time, to see what the fuss is about, or coming back to it after a decades-long hiatus. Businesspeople see a future in which cannabis is part of a functional, even aspirational life style. Like Julia Child introducing Americans to French cuisine, Wolf serves as both a guide and an ambassador to this world. She was a chef and a food editor for many years, and she stands out as a source of reliable information in a nascent industry without dependable methods for cooking and dosing. Ricardo Baca, the founding editor of the Cannabist, told me, “Laurie represents a voice in the food-and-cannabis space that can be trusted.” Her columns are full of global ingredients and lush food photography meant to attract what she calls “the CB2 and West Elm crowd.” Her books would not seem out of place on the shelf next to the latest tome from the Barefoot Contessa or Yotam Ottolenghi. Evan Senn, the editor of the California-based cannabis magazine Culture, told me that, increasingly, foodies are the target audience for pot. “I love to drink wine, and I’m kind of a snob about it,” she said. “I’m not going to drink Franzia out of a cardboard box. I’m going to buy a nice bottle of Pinot Noir and aerate it and enjoy it. I have the same approach to edibles.”

Extracts, or concentrates, are exactly what they sound like—products with high levels of THC that are made from cannabis by a number of methods, from sifting buds to isolate cannabinoid-rich trichomes,to supercritical CO2 extraction, which uses carbon dioxide at very high pressures to pull cannabinoids from the plant. (This professional technique is a popular way to decaffeinate coffee.) There is a dizzying array of extracts available, as well as ways to consume them, from vaporizing to smoking them atop traditional bud. And some have found their way into the kitchen.
Cannabis has anti inflammatory properties, which when applied in a salve, will prevent your body from rushing to heal the wound. The rush of white blood cells to the injury is the cause of the scar and the anti inflammatory slows that process down. The scar doesn’t form as badly and while it is still there, won’t be as rough when it finally finishes healing.
How to Make Cannabis Infused Rice Crispy Treats Even though we are all adults here, we all crave the comfort foods of our childhood from time to time. Honestly, who can resist the ooey-gooey goodness of melted marshmallow mixed with warm rice crispies — especially when they are infused with your favorite plant? Talk about an irresistible combination for nearly anyone but diabetics. Making a good batch of weed infused rice crispy treats comes down to using high-quality ingredients and following a few simple directions. Use this helpful step-by-step guide to get started with your first batch of canna-crispies: You …

Melt the cannabis butter in a small saucepan over low heat and blend in remaining ingredients. Stuff the turkey and/or season it with salt and pepper, if desired. Make a small incision in the skin of the turkey. Force a finger through the slit and break the contact between the skin and the meat. Using a meat injector, squirt half the butter mixture under the skin. Cook the turkey according to your favorite method, basting it with the remaining butter mixture every half hour until it’s done. We cooked it on a Traeger grill and it was juicier and more moist than any turkey I have ever had before.


Learn How to Make Marijuana Chocolate Chip Cookies! Without a doubt these were the cookies cookie monster was so chronically addicted to. Everyone and their mom loves chocolate chip cookies. They possess a flavorful chocolate and cookie taste that’s simply irresistable and as a stoner, with these sweets you really get the best of both worlds. They put milk and cookies in a whole new dimension and chances are you’ll want to be there for a while.

After making several batches of cookies over the past year, in my opinion decarbing your weed before making butter might not be necessary. I noticed a weaker high when eating a decarbed cookie vs and undecarbed cookie. This is all anecdotal but that’s how I feel. The cooking process while making the butter which is a 3 hour long boil and while the cookies are being baked, should be enough. But those cookies jack me up more than any other edible I have ever purchased. I will always make my own.


28 grams of flower 15-20% THC level. I crush the flower by hand so there is very little small grind/powder. I then turn on the crock pot on low and add 6 sticks of butter and start the melt. I put the ground up flower on a cookie sheet and cook at 225 for about 40-45 minutes. Take the Decarb flower and dump into the already melted butter and cook for 2 hours on low then 4 hours on warm, take it off heat and let cool for 4 hours and then put it back on warm setting for another 6-8 hours, pull it off cool it for 4 hours and do that one more time. I then put double layer of cheesecloth in a strainer and pour the mix and let it drain until I can’t see anything else dripping through. Then I fold up the cheese cloth and wrap another layer around that and squeeze the extra butter out. YES I know, I know I am adding a slight amount of bitterness from the plant but I want to get as much of the THC as I can get.
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