This 6-year-old cookbook is from High Times magazine, the pot-championing publication founded in 1974. The book collects recipes from various sources (cooks who’ve contributed to the magazine, a “dude from Texas”) and begins with a workmanlike introduction that covers some of the basics of working with and consuming cannabis. But those basics are minimal; strains of cannabis, relative potency and issues of temperature and decarboxylation aren’t covered. Dosing in the recipes is also vague: a recipe, for example, says it “stones 4,” and there’s no mention of how many mgs are in the servings. The recipes are fun, and hardly technically difficult: the chocolate layer cake calls for Betty Crocker cake mix and frosting. If the Munchies book is for hipster stoners, this one is for people who’ve been listening to their Cheech and Chong records on vinyl since the last time it was cool.
Wolf gave me a preview of the meal: marijuana-free chicken Marbella and couscous, paired with infused sides and appetizers. The dishes had been set out on a sideboard. Next to each one was a card with the potency level noted in calligraphy: “Stuffed Mushrooms, 5 mg THC each.” (Five milligrams of tetrahydrocannabinol is about the equivalent of a few puffs from a joint.) The secret to cooking with cannabis is fat. THC, the main psychoactive ingredient, bonds to fat molecules when heated. There are high-tech ways of doing this, but Wolf prefers to do it “the old-fashioned way, with good butter and good oil.” Her cookbooks always begin with recipes for what she calls canna-butter and canna-oil.
When your cannaoil or cannabutter is done infusing, remove any plant matter by carefully straining it through cheesecloth (available in the cooking section of stores like Target or Walmart) or a coffee filter. Pour your infusion into a container and you’re done! Be sure to put your cannabutter in the fridge to harden, but cannaoils are fine to store on the counter. The most important thing is to keep it in an airtight container (mason jars work great) in a cool, dark space.

 Fill the cupcake tins with the batter about 2/3 of the way full to leave room for your THC treats to fluff up and be pretty. Put them inside the oven and let them hang out in there for about 17-20 minutes or until completely cooked in the middle. (Poke a toothpick in the middle of the cupcakes to check, if the pick comes out clean with no batter then they’re done) When they’re finished in the oven let them sit for 5-10 minutes to cool. Now it’s time to hand out these yummy marijuana chocolate cupcakes and get couch locked. You says you can’t have you cake and get high too?

Place the sweet potatoes in a preheated oven at 400 degrees F until they are soft. Peel the potatoes and then mash them with 3 ounces of bud butter and 1 tablespoon of rum. Place this mixture aside for now and melt the remaining ounce of bud butter with a sauté pan. Add in the sugar and stir the mix until the sugar melts fully and it begins to bubble slowly. Toss in the grapefruit and sauté this all together until the liquid is reduced by about half. Grab your fresh grapefruit juice and add that in as well as the last 2 tablespoons of rum. Cook this all together for about a minute. Add this new mix in with the sweet potatoes and mix together well. Season with salt and pepper to taste if you would like and boom! These mashed grapefruit sweet potatoes are hot and ready to serve! Enjoy!
Begin by placing the cannabutter (or regular butter) and the ham in a larger frying pan. Take the eggs that you have ready and crack them in to a mixing bowl, making sure to whisk them together well, so that all of the yolks are broken. Grind up your marijuana very fine (it’s a good idea to use a coffee grinder and to be sure that your weed is incredibly dry) and add it in to your eggs. This is also where you add in your food coloring, making the eggs green in two different ways.
You must be 21 years of age to attend our experiences. Please make sure to bring your non-expired ID, or State issued License. Temporary IDs cannot be used to validate entry into dispensaries and/or grow facilities. Non-US Citizens must present a valid passport to enter cannabis businesses. These are the rules of the Marijuana Enforcement Division.

Hugh! I am so glad to have found you! I have been smoking herb for 37 yrs but am asthmatic and recently my lungs got so bad I HAD to give it up! After my lungs improved I researched how to make oil with herb but some of the instructions make no sense to me – wash the herb, dry it (or put it in a dehydrator?), wash it again, then roast it: all before cooking it with oil, in a special contraption, for 18hrs??? I consider myself a quick study & good cook so I combined a bunch of methods, took advice from some of the comments, simplified it & tried the following: I cleaned it (I buy it on the stalk with seeds in, leaves removed); chopped it in a coffee grinder – just like I would before rolling, fine but not powdery – roasted it on a cookie sheet in my oven at 250 for 1hr; put it in a glass bowl with coconut oil at a 1:2 herb to oil ratio; returned it to the oven & continued heating it at 250 for 2hrs. After it cooled I strained it using cheese cloth & used some in baking, some on crackers, some mixed with peanut butter. I found it best in the baking. I am currently living in the Caribbean and – after years of searching – finally found a grower/seller who provides me with very good quality herb at a great price (VERY hard for a non local to get). Pure coconut oil (commercial, not organic) is a helluva lot cheaper than butter here and I am on a tight budget so I am happy with this this combination/method. Also, the amount of herb that I would have smoked in 1 day made enough baked goods to last me 10 days!!! SO MY QUESTION, after all that (LOL) is, do you think I need to roast the herb before putting it in the oil? The above recipe doesn’t call for it but it does call for much more cooking time of the oil – and doesn’t mention oven heating, which I find easy. Alternatively, do you think I could cut the oil heating down to 1hr? I know absolutely nothing about science and I would like to make the process as efficient as possible. I guess it would be easiest to chop the herb, stalk seeds & all, but how would that affect the taste & potency? With my described method there was almost no smell when it was roasting alone or being heated with the oil, and no herb taste in the baked goods. And another thing: back in Canada a guy I used to buy herb cookies from told me to eat something small (like a 2nd, non-herb cookie) 15-20 minutes after ingesting as it would jump-start the high. I find this to be true but am wondering if it just works because I believe it will? Do you know anything about that? Lastly, I found that my baked goods didn’t fully kick in for 45mins – 1hr but the high lasted 4 – 6hrs. Thanks so much for any input you may have! 🙂
Instead of an oil rig, High CBD Hash Oil can be used in many vaporizer pens. As long as you can apply portions of product at a time and the vaporizer doesn’t take specific cartridges, you may use High CBD Hash Oil from Green Dream in those vape pens. Ask any supplier of smoking accessories to assist you in finding one. Like from an oil rig, these devices produce smoke that is cough inducing and potent.
All you have to do to get your medicated mayo is whisk together the egg yolks, the salt, vinegar, lemon juice, and mustard together. Make sure it’s mixed up well. Slowly add in the cannabis oil while still whisking the mixture. Do this carefully or risk making a huge mess. Once the oil is completely added in, continue to whisk the mixture until is begins to thicken. If it gets too thick, you can add a few drops of water to get the right consistency. Put the mayo in an airtight container and let it chill in the refrigerator for about two hours.
"A beautiful, bold contribution to humanity that enables newbies and the experienced to learn the versatile ways this ancient plant can be used for food and medicine. Wonderful photographs, delectable recipes and in-depth explanations on how to use cannabis safely and effectively to get the desired results, whether it be for food, fun, or medicine." - ​world-renowned herbalist Brigitte Mars
In addition to pain salves and balms, cannabis coconut oil is a great addition to almost any skincare routine. Mixed with aloe vera and vitamin E, it makes a great lotion for everyday use or for healing sunburns. Some skincare gurus swear by cannabis coconut oil as a facial moisturizer, claiming that with regular use, you’ll get a glowy complexion and see the anti-aging effects of cannabis.
While too much heat will kill your THC, some heat is necessary. Most people do not realize the raw cannabis plant contains no THC at all. It does contain THC-A (or THC-acid). It takes the process of adding heat or decarboxylation to make the chemical reaction that converts THC-A to THC. If you are infusing butter or oil, some decarboxylation is taken care of in the process of infusion, mostly.  But lab tests show that even when making infusions, decarbing first will up the percentage of THC extracted.  If you are cooking with kief you will need to decarboxylate first. I recommend this step when cooking with hash too, as it can help maximize THC potency.   For more info on decarboxylation, why you need it, and how to do it, see this page.
And if President Trump has taught us anything, it’s that not everything that looks appealing on reality TV works well in real life. Full-scale cannabis restaurants do not yet exist, even in states that have legalized. The techniques involved in making pot-infused crème fraîche are rather complicated for a home chef, especially one who likes to get baked before baking. And of course, achieving the correct dosage for each person at a marijuana dinner party is nearly impossible — one diner might literally require ten to twenty times as much THC as another. Perhaps that’s why it’s more entertaining to watch the making of a full weed meal than to consume one. “If I wasn’t on the show, it’s not how I would choose to be high,” says Lavorato. “I would just smoke.”
In 2007, Child folded. The Wolfs decided to move to Oregon, seeking a change of pace. Laurie busied herself with a cookbook, “Portland, Oregon Chef’s Table,” for which she gathered recipes from local chefs. One day, when she was getting her car repaired, she struck up a conversation with a man in the service-station waiting room. “He stuck out his hand and said, ‘I’m Dr. Phil. Not that Dr. Phil. I’m a pot doctor.’ ” Medical marijuana had been legal in Oregon since 1998, and the doctor, Phil Leveque, was one of the state’s first practitioners. Wolf told him about her epilepsy and problems with Tegretol. “He told me, ‘Get off that stuff. It’s poison.’ ” Leveque wrote her a prescription for medical cannabis and instructed her to consume a small amount each morning. She found that it not only controlled her seizures but also stopped the “auras”—feelings of dizziness she’d continued to have on the anti-convulsant. She stopped taking Tegretol, and she hasn’t had a seizure since. “I don’t know if I can say I’m cured, but my symptoms are completely managed,” Wolf said.
I like this book and Cheri Sicard is like a weed wizard. Very helpful for a medical marijuana patient who is trying to learn to cook with weed. Only problem is I am having a hard time trying to determine the THC level for a tincture I made and the formula for dosing doesn't seem to give me a correct % for the amount of weed used and Everclear alcohol. BTW 95% Everclear is way too strong alcohol content. I would look to a less concentrated alcohol for future tinctures.

Wolf learned about food at friends’ homes and on vacations, which featured pit stops for roadside delicacies like fried apple pies. After college, at N.Y.U., she ran a catering business, then studied at the Culinary Institute of America, where her nickname was Noodles. She worked in several Manhattan restaurants, including the River Café and a small Upper East Side place called the Wine Bistro. In 1980, she met Bruce, who turned her on to food styling, the art of preparing food for photo shoots. She started doing freelance magazine work, writing recipes for Self, New York, and Mademoiselle, then moved to the parenting magazine Child, where, for nineteen years, she wrote a monthly column on family-friendly recipes.
With an easy and more precise dosage method, medical cannabis oils are ideal for oral consumption. However, they can be just as effortlessly added to what you’re eating. Because our extraction process includes decarboxylation, there is no need to decarb the oil on your own before cooking like you have to with dried flower. This means you can just add the oil to basically anything without any fuss or extra time. To add your oil into a food, simply measure your dosage as you normally would do with the syringe and add that specific amount to your recipe. If you’re cooking for one, you only need one dose. If you’re making a large batch, multiple your single dose by how many servings you are creating. (For example, if you’re making a dozen brownies you’ll want to add twelve times your single-use dose.) Ensure you mix thoroughly to distribute your medical cannabis evenly throughout your recipe.
Adding water is optional not mandatory. I would not reheat with water at this point. Stain the plant material off, if you haven’t already. If there is a lot of sediment in the bottom you can optionally reheat gently over low heat and further strain through a mesh yogurt strainer to further clarify it, but again it is optional. Will it taste too weedy? That is a personal preference but it should likely be OK, especially if you use it in highly seasoned foods that have lots of other flavors going on (a coconut curry perhaps?). Good luck.
Now, Sayegh works with lab-produced extracts. Though they’re mostly fat-soluble, he says the lab he works with also produces a water-soluble version using a proprietary method. He’s tight-lipped about exactly how the water-soluble extract works, but says it “helps keep the integrity” of the THC “without burning it off,” and means he can infuse frozen meals that can withstand the oven and microwave—something he does especially for critically ill patients, in collaboration with a nutritionist.
Sayegh is at the forefront of a growing movement to reimagine cannabis in the kitchen, and he’s become known for his many-coursed gourmet THC-infused dinners in a style he describes as “French with Italian and Middle Eastern influence.” But tonight his gingerbread construction—which he’s created for a party benefitting the victims of a warehouse fire in Northern California—is just for show. Sayegh hasn’t lab-tested the village, so he doesn’t know how potent it might be, and he won’t serve imprecisely dosed food. Once upon a time, the menu included cannabis-infused appetizers to appease guests salivating over the off-limits village, but it turns out cocktails are on offer at this party, and mixing cannabis edibles with liquor can make for a “dizzy” experience, he says; he doesn’t serve them together. Guests still partake of his hors d’oeuvres, but they’re made solely from non-mind-expanding ingredients. Navigating such things are all part of the job; complications traditional chefs have never pondered.
Because cooks use cannabis for its chemical effects, not just as a seasoning, a field of homespun, and increasingly more professional, technology has grown around it. Techniques for refining the plant matter into usable and potent ingredients range from stovetop simple to serious industrial processing—all in the quest to make bioavailable, accurately dosed dishes that also taste good.
Because oils are slow-acting and long-lasting, it’s recommended that you start low, and go slow when experimenting with oils. They’re a much more concentrated version of flowers and buds and can have some unpleasant side effects like nausea, dizziness, thirst, and a drop in blood sugar levels if you go too quickly. Taking the oil with food in your stomach has been known to minimize nausea.
For those who go meatless and dairy-free, this quirky cookbook lets you enjoy delicious, cannabis-infused meals and munchies without skipping a beat. Filled with cheeky illustrations and 100 simple recipes spanning all dishes, it’s designed for beginners who may be finding their way around the kitchen while looking for vegan-friendly substitutes. Note: A lot of recipes in this cookbook include soy.

For an additional boost in bioavailability, we suggest adding 1+ teaspoon of soy lecithin to the crockpot with the starting material and coconut oil. Soy lecithin is a naturally occurring compound found in all cells in nature, plants and animals. The inclusion of lecithin homogenizes the oil and boosts your body’s ability to absorb the cannabinoids; resulting in more intense effects from the same starting material.


Cannabis-infused oil is probably the most versatile medium and a great place to start, since it can be used for baking desserts, sautéing veggies, frying up your morning eggs, or in your salad dressing. In addition, as is the case with cooking anything at home, you have complete control over its preparation. Does peanut oil hold a special place in your heart? Make cannabis-infused peanut oil!
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