Take 2 muffin tins and place the paper liners in each open holder, this is what you’ll be using to form the cups. Next pour chocolate chips into a microwave safe bowl and microwave them for about 2 minutes, after 1 minute stop and stir the chocolate and then let it continue to cook for the remaining minute. Once the chips are finished in the microwave, immediately add your finely ground Mary Jane and stir it into the chocolate making sure to mix them together very well.

Corinne Tobias, a home cook who writes about cooking with cannabis on her blog Wake + Bake, described an experience in which she ate half of an infused grilled cheese sandwich and got “super crazy ridiculously messed up.” She wrote that she felt like she was “melting into the floor” and spent “half of her afternoon” asking for reassurance that she was not dying. “When I first started cooking with cannabis,” she writes, “I had no idea that it was going to be such a struggle to predict the perfect dosage. I’d make oil using the same method, but every time I harvested a different strain, my cannabis oil would be stronger or weaker and I had to spend a day or two as a human guinea pig, slowly testing my oil until I knew it was just right.” Now she is a fan of the tCheck, a $299 home potency tester.
Depending on how many baked goods you’d like to make, it should be somewhat easy to divide it up accordingly, once you’ve determined how many mgs of THC you have in your batch. The maximum legal amount in recreationally available edibles ranges from 5mg to 20mg per edible, depending on state law, however you’re not bound by these limitations. If you’re not sure about your perfect dose or are inexperienced with edibles, 3-5 mgs would be a good starting point.
I can’t say that I’m a huge fan of mayo but working in the food business has shown me that it’s probably the single most popular condiment out there. People put mayo with everything. They’ll put it on subs, dip their fries in it, put it in the calzones and on their pizza. It’s insane how much people like mayo. So here’s this recipe for mayo that will taste awesome and it will also give you a little buzz. The recipe is really easy but just know that you will need cannabis oil so have some of the on hand before you start.
 Next, fill a large pan with the vegetable oil and let that get nice and hot. Remember to be careful when handling hot oi,l it has a tendancy to be mean and pop around when it’s hot. You’ll know the oil is the right temperature if you put a small drop of batter in, and it starts to sizzle and turn brown, now it’s ready to start cooking your special bananas.
Start by preheating the oven to 350F. Then, combine the yeast and 3/4 cup of warm water. Let this sit for about five minutes to activate the yeast. While this sits, in a separate bowl, combine the salt, gluten free flour blend, and the baking powder. Whisk together until well combined. In the dry mixture, make a small well and add the yeast mixture, the olive oil, and an additional 1/2 cup of warm water before stirring well with a wooden spoon. Using more olive oil, coat a baking sheet and place the dough in the center. Working from the middle, press the dough outwards in to a circle. You want it to be around 1/4 of an inch thick. Place the dough in the over for about 25 minutes or until it begins to lightly brown.

That evening’s festivities were business, of a kind. Dope, a “cannabis lifestyle” magazine, was hosting its annual Oregon Dope Cup in Portland. The event is one of many that aspire to be the Oscars of the legal-cannabis industry. Laurie & MaryJane had won a Best Edible trophy at the previous Dope Cup, in Seattle, for its savory nuts. Last year, the company agreed to host an edibles dinner for the magazine’s guests, including the cup’s judges, who had flown in from Colorado.

Wolf learned about food at friends’ homes and on vacations, which featured pit stops for roadside delicacies like fried apple pies. After college, at N.Y.U., she ran a catering business, then studied at the Culinary Institute of America, where her nickname was Noodles. She worked in several Manhattan restaurants, including the River Café and a small Upper East Side place called the Wine Bistro. In 1980, she met Bruce, who turned her on to food styling, the art of preparing food for photo shoots. She started doing freelance magazine work, writing recipes for Self, New York, and Mademoiselle, then moved to the parenting magazine Child, where, for nineteen years, she wrote a monthly column on family-friendly recipes.
"The way Julia Child brought French cuisine to the uncultured American masses in her debut cookbook 'Mastering the Art of French Cooking' is what Elise McDonough and the editors at High Times Magazine have done with 'The Official High Times Cannabis Cookbook'. Informative and accessible, it's an essential staple for any 'budding' chef. Starting with a wide range of basics that bind THC to fat molecules (cannabis-infused butters, oils and tinctures plus bonus mayonnaise and flour recipes), the book ventures offers easy-to-prepare recipes that will have even the sober drooling (the photographs help). Highlights include 'Cheeto Fried Chicken' from Fresh Off the Boat author and chef Eddie Huang, a Thai-style Tom Yum 'Ganja' soup, a Thanksgiving turkey with a marijuana-infused marinade, and even latkes."
Combine oil and cannabis in your double-boiler or slow cooker, and heat the two together on low or warm for a few hours. This allows for decarboxylation (activation of THC) without scorching (which destroys the active ingredients). Cooking can be done a variety of ways: in a slow cooker on low for 4-6 hours, stirring occasionally; in a double-boiler on low for at least 6 hours (8 is better), stirring occasionally; or in a simple saucepan on low for at least three hours, stirring frequently (a saucepan is most susceptible to scorching). In all cases, a small amount of water can be added to the mixture to help avoid burning. Note: whatever method you choose, temperature of the oil should not exceed 245°F.
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