The complete culinary world becomes much more exciting when cooking through the eyes of a stoner chef, and canna-olive-oil in a must in a pot head’s pantry. All you need is a bottle of olive oil and of course some sticky-icky and there’s really no limit to what high foods you can make. Savory, sweet, tangy, you name it and canna-oil will help you put a potent touch on it.
Yep, you got it! The only difference for me when making topicals is I decarb some of it and leave some undecarbed so I get full spectrum (both THC-A and CBD-A along with THC and CBD). This is optional, but I find it makes the most effective topicals. I am currently at work on a new online course about making cannabis topicals, but you are definitely on the right track.

Place the sweet potatoes in a preheated oven at 400 degrees F until they are soft. Peel the potatoes and then mash them with 3 ounces of bud butter and 1 tablespoon of rum. Place this mixture aside for now and melt the remaining ounce of bud butter with a sauté pan. Add in the sugar and stir the mix until the sugar melts fully and it begins to bubble slowly. Toss in the grapefruit and sauté this all together until the liquid is reduced by about half. Grab your fresh grapefruit juice and add that in as well as the last 2 tablespoons of rum. Cook this all together for about a minute. Add this new mix in with the sweet potatoes and mix together well. Season with salt and pepper to taste if you would like and boom! These mashed grapefruit sweet potatoes are hot and ready to serve! Enjoy!

These recipes are so obviously yummy that I bought the book even though medication is not a goal for my cooking. The recipes are sophisticated but not overly complicated. Instructions are crystal clear in an accessible and easy-to-use visual and written style. The cannabis specific tips and basic methods and recipes are clearly just what the doctor ordered for anyone wanting to make medicated dishes that taste wonderful. This book full of recipes is good enough to stand alone, and light years beyond the miserable excuses for brownies that used to be the limit in this category. The recipes I made were both easy and delicious.
How to make Marinated Chicken Legs with Marijuana… Stoner life isn’t all about snack,s and we do know how to enjoy a well cooked savory meal. Chicken is the bomb, and pretty much everyone on the planet agrees, but chicken that gets you high; whoa!  This recipe is a weed smokers dream meal. The marinade is delicious and penetrates through the chicken legs to give you a burst of moist chicken flavor in every bite. Grab a leg and eat it alone, or serve with your favorite side for complete satisfaction.
Bake these little cakes in a muffin pan. I don’t know if they make little mini cake pans. But if they do, use those. It just gets kind of complicated if you fill the muffin tin up too high with batter because the outside edge slants. This makes it difficult when stacking the individual cakes to make the full one. Cook them in the over for about 10 minutes at 350. After then 10 minutes, check the cakes with a toothpick and make sure that they’re cooked all the way through.

Substitute your marijuana infused butter for regular butter.[9] Unlike with oils, most recipes use small amounts of butter for flavor. You can substitute the entire recipe amount with marijuana butter. If you find that you are not getting the needed medicinal effect, consider increasing the amount of marijuana per stick of butter to a half an ounce. Alternately, you can use a different method of cooking with marijuana.
I have been a few batches of High THC cookies when I started making “vegan” cookies for a few friends.Simply put.I used clarified unsalted butter.Well with little extra moisture,I burnt the bottoms of the 1st batch.So I figured.I would try 1,It fucked me up,But tated burnt.The next batch.I said fuck it & cooked them for less time.BIG DIFFERENCE..In cookies,hey will reach the 350 F temp & you will start burning off your THC.BUT in Brownies,which are thicker & moister,the inside doesn’t reach 350 F,so you don’t burn any THC off…When I’m ready to make cookie ONLY ,I decarb my bud at 240 for 20-30 minutes in a Pyrex (name brand- I use a glass pie pan).COVER with foil.Check at 25mins.Then ever 5 minutes.Do not go over 45 mins.Leave to cool COVERED in the glass pan.THUS when cooking,the bud will finish decarbing.FOR ANYTHING ELSE THRN COOKIES….ITS 240 FOR 30-40 MINS,,CHECKING AT 30 MINUTES,45 TOPS .after 45 minutes,you’re burning it off.Beening doing this this was for over 30yrs.
Yep, you got it! The only difference for me when making topicals is I decarb some of it and leave some undecarbed so I get full spectrum (both THC-A and CBD-A along with THC and CBD). This is optional, but I find it makes the most effective topicals. I am currently at work on a new online course about making cannabis topicals, but you are definitely on the right track.

Not only that but adding cannabis butter to a burger is a lot easier than most people think. By mixing cannabis butter with ketchup, mayonnaise, or mustard, you can make any beefy (or veggie) burger medicated. Adding the cannabis butter will give you a delicious meal that will give you a long lasting high. Keep that method in mind for when this burger is complete, fried cannabis leaves in all.
Well, there are several reasons for me to purchase this book. First of all, I was intrigued by .. let's say new opportunities. And I was also curious about a recommendation for choosing and buying a proper weed. And yes, Cannabis infused BBQ sauce is that thing I've dreamed about for a while. I have found answers for all my questions about marijuana ingesting in this particular book. Actually, I've found much more information here.
Yes it would work to just decarb during the cooking, but when we lab testing back to back edibles, those made with kief that had been decarbed first has about a 30% higher potency than those made with kief that only decarbed during the cooking process. That’s why I always recommend taking the extra step to decarb BEFORE cooking, even if it will be debarbed during as well.
While summer is over and most people are trying to drink the warmest drinks that they can get their hands on. However, there are some that like to drink lemonade no matter what time of the year it is, warm or cold! This recipe is a great one for cannabis lemonade, using Everclear. Most of the alcohol should be burned off in the extracting process and you can extend the time slightly to make sure that you’ve burned off all of the alcohol.
If you plan on using it immediately, obviously you’ll want a recipe ready. Simply use the cannabis oil to replace part of the oil called for in the recipe. Since you don’t know what the potency is, make sure you start low and go slow with your first couple of culinary creations. You can start with maybe a half to one ounce of oil until you feel comfortable with the strength.
Alternately, you can do your straining through cheesecloth. Use multiple layers for more filtration. Put your cheesecloth over the top of a large mixing bowl. Secure the sides with a rubber band. Pour the mixture into the bowl. If you can get cheesecloth, this method is often preferred because you can filter more at a time than you can with a coffee strainer.
How to Make Infused Coconut Oil Making cannabis-infused coconut oil is as simple as steeping quality herb in a quality oil. Machines are available to make cannabis-infused coconut oil, but the infusion process can be done right on a stovetop or hot plate with the help of a double boiler. What You Will Need Double boiler (you can make one if you don’t own one) ¼ to ½ ounce of cannabis 1 cup of coconut oil (organic, expeller-pressed works best for this process) 2-3 feet of cooking twine (a clean unused white shoestring will work in a pinch) Cheesecloth (about an 8” x 10” piece) TIP: A ratio of one quarter ounce of cannabis to one cup of oil is a good starting point. If you want a potent oil, high-quality flower (15%+ THC) works well. However, until you become more comfortable with the process or if you have limited funds, using shake, trim and/or kief work fine (avoid stems and seeds). Cooking Directions Prepare the “herb packet”: Lay the cheese cloth out flat Place the cannabis (breaking up larger pieces) into the middle and distribute evenly over a small area (remember the packet needs to fit into the top pan) Fold in opposite ends to cover the herb Now fold in one of the open ends, tuck and roll Tie the roll of herb tightly with cooking twine (tying a knot in one end and then guiding the twine through it works good) Fill the bottom pan of a double boiler with a few inches of water (allowing enough space so that it does not touch the top pan) and set the shallow pan on top. Place over medium heat to a gentle boil - NOT a rolling boil. Add 1 cup of coconut oil to the top pan. When the coconut oil is almost melted, add about 1 cup of water so that the liquid will cover the herb packet [Note: Coconut oil is nonpolar and water is polar so they will naturally separate when chilled; and THC and CBD are not soluble in water, but are in certain carrier oils. Therefore, the coconut oil acts as the carrier and will “soak” up the cannabinoids, leaving any impurities in the water.] Continue heating the oil and water mixture until all of the coconut oil is melted and then add the herb packet - pressing down gently into the liquid using a metal spoon. Cover and leave to cook for 90 minutes, checking back every half hour or so to flip over the packet and stir it around gently. Also, check the water in the bottom pan to make sure it is not boiling too hard and that the water level is still good - be careful to avoid any escaping steam when removing the top pan. After 90 minutes, the oil and water mixture should be a deep green color. At this point, turn off the heat and remove the herb packet and place in a bowl. Squeeze out any oil that is trapped in the “herb packet” by pressing with a spoon (when it cools down, you can give it another squeeze by hand to get every drop). Add this to the liquid mixture and place in the refrigerator to cool. When the mixture is cooled, the water and oil separate (dirty looking water on the bottom and a nice green color solidified oil containing the good stuff on top). Gently poke 2 or 3 holes through the oil, turn over (holding your hand gently over the oil) and drain the water off. If you are not going to use the oil immediately, store in a container (glass preferred) and label with date, strain and ratio. This will help you determine which strains and in what quantities work best for you. The most important thing to remember is that the effects of consuming cannabis-infused coconut oil (directly or as an ingredient in a cooked dish) are usually slow-acting due to the cannabinoids having to be digested first. As such, it may take up to three (3) hours for you to feel its maximum effects, and those effects could last for awhile. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed or concerned about overdosing, don’t panic -- no one has ever died as a direct result of consuming cannabis. Choosing the Right Strain Your next choice will be determining what strain(s) of cannabis to use. The infusion process does not drastically change the effects or flavors of the variety of cannabis used. Therefore, you will want to use a cannabis strain that delivers the desired effects you want to achieve (indica, sativa, hybrid, high-CBD). Most importantly, you want to be sure that the cannabis you use is free from impurities (such as mold, fungus, bugs, and pesticides). If the cannabis is compromised, the infusion process will not correct it. Cooking Temperatures Cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are all affected differently by heat. A double boiler traps steam between the pans (provided you have a good seal) and remains steady about 212° F. The most volatile terpenes will start to evaporate around 70° F (filling the air with a pungent aroma). A majority of the remaining terpenes will begin to evaporate rapidly around 100° F. The boiling points of flavonoids range between 273.2° and 352.4° F, so the dominant flavors of the strain you use should still be evident in the infused oil. Cannabinoids, specifically THC and CBD, exist in acidic and activated forms. In the plant, these cannabinoids exist almost entirely in the acidic form and are known as THCA and CBDA. When heated, these acidic forms undergo a chemical reaction called decarboxylation that results in THCA converting to THC and CBDA converting to CBD. Complete activation occurs when heated to 220° F for 90 minutes. In theory, the double boiler cooks at 212° F, but many factors can change that number, so you may need to experiment by adding or subtracting a few minutes to achieve your desired effects. Remember, if you are going to use the oil in a recipe that will expose it to further heat, you don’t want it to be fully activated at this stage. Further, coconut oil has an average smoking point of 350° F, and can be very tricky to cook on direct heat. A double boiler cooks by steam so the oil doesn’t burn easily. Overcooking the oil compromises the fats and the taste will be most unappealing. If this happens, all you can do is throw it out, wipe the pan clean, and start over. Health Benefits Cannabis and coconut oil are what some would call the perfect pair. Coupling coconut oil, “a vegan-friendly super food,” with cannabis, “nature’s miracle plant,” makes a lot of sense. Coconut oil is a saturated oil made primarily of medium-chain fatty acids. It is safe to ingest in edible form and is easily digested. It gets its extra punch from lauric acid (C12), which comprises about 50% of the total fatty acids, and has been linked to many health benefits: reducing abdominal obesity, accelerating healing time for wounds, delivering antioxidant properties, lowering lipid components (e.g. cholesterol, triglycerides), preventing bone loss and more. Some people even use coconut oil as a daily detox. Saturated fats have gotten a bad rap for decades. They have been accused of contributing to high cholesterol, heart disease, obesity, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Much confusion and contradictory evidence exists on the subject, even among health care professionals. Professionals, like Dr. Aseem Malhotra, are trying to set the record straight. Dr. Malhotra gained attention after the publication of his peer-reviewed editorial in the 2013 British Medical Journal (BMJ), wherein he seriously challenged the conventional view on saturated fats, and found no significant association between saturated fat and cardiovascular risk. Coconut Oil Uses There are so many things you can do with cannabis infused coconut oil including: Drizzle over hot cooked pastas, grains, cereals and vegetables Great for sauces and dressings Add to hot cooked soups and stews Use as a poultry rub Pan fry foods like scrambled egg, fish, bananas, chicken Put a spoonful in your coffee, tea or hot chocolate Add to smoothies Types of Coconut Oil Organic, virgin (or extra-virgin), raw, unrefined, centrifuged and cold-pressed are all terms you want to look for when selecting a coconut oil for ingesting with no cooking or for use in low-heat cooking. These oils typically deliver a strong coconut flavor. Organic, refined, expeller-pressed and solvent-free are the terms you are looking for when selecting an oil for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, especially when using higher temperatures. These refined oils also tend to have a lighter coconut flavor. Virgin Oil: Unrefined / Centrifuged Oil True virgin oil is a centrifuged coconut oil produced without using heat. It is considered one of the highest quality oils, but also one of the most expensive coconut oils on the market today. Terms like raw, pure and unrefined are associated with virgin oils. Virgin coconut oil has a more distinct coconut flavor. It is considered by most to be extremely mild and smooth, and can be eaten right off a spoon. Producing high-quality virgin oil is timely and expensive. Using a machine (centrifuge) cooled by chilled water, coconut cream is produced from pressing the fresh, white meat of the coconut and then concentrating it to yield more and more oil while the proteins and water soluble constituents are separated out and more of the phytonutrients are preserved. Unlike olive oil and some of the other oils, there are no standards to be met in the coconut oil industry to claim extra-virgin status. It is mostly a buzz word used for marketing. Cold-pressed Oils Cold-pressed coconut oils are also often referred to as raw or unrefined. The extraction method used to produce these oils is very similar to the centrifuged method used to make virgin coconut oils. The cold-pressing method however uses a drying process, which can be accomplished using varying degrees of heat. Therefore, very few cold-pressed oils are truly virgin oils. The method of drying and amount of heat used will determine the quality and taste of the coconut oil. Oils processed at high temperatures may taste of toasted coconut, while those processed at lower temperatures tend to deliver more of a mild, raw coconut flavor. If the oil was poorly processed, it may exhibit burnt or rancid qualities. Refined or RBD Coconut Oils Most coconut oils available on the market today are refined or RBD (refined, bleached and deodorized). If a label doesn’t say it is otherwise, then it is most likely refined. These are typically the least expensive of all coconut oils. Refined coconut oil should deliver a light, delicate flavor. The refining process strips away some of the nutrients, but it doesn’t have to alter other attributes of the coconut oil (such as fatty acid profile, taste, aroma). The methods for producing refined oils varies significantly, and can be accomplished with or without harsh solvents (like lye or hexane). If a product doesn’t say it is solvent free, it is a safe bet it was chemically processed and you should avoid it. Otherwise, RBD oils are fine to use, especially for cooking. Bleaching simply refers to the filtering process to remove impurities and is generally not a chemical process. Organic usually signifies that no harsh chemicals or solvents were used in the production. Expeller-pressed Extraction Method The expeller-pressed extraction method is used to produce RBD oils. During production the coconut meat is dried (most often by sun or smoke) and then pressed in large expeller presses. The resulting coconut oil is crude and must be refined or cleaned to minimize free fatty acids, remove remaining moisture, and minimize bad flavors or aromas. Expeller-pressed coconut oils can be a good option if you do not want to pay the premium for virgin oils. They are also a good option for those who do not like the taste of coconuts, or don’t want a strong coconut flavor for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, certain foods. Just be certain that no chemicals or solvents were used in the process. MCT Oil Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are a form of saturated fatty acid that has numerous health benefits. Coconut oil is one great source of MCTs. Roughly 65% of the fatty acids in coconut oil are medium-chain triglycerides. There are four kinds of MCTs: caproic (C6), caprylic (C8), capric (C10) and lauric (C12) acids. Generally speaking, the shorter the chain (meaning the lower the number of carbons the acid has), the faster the body can turn the fatty acids into ketones (usable energy). MCT oil is not an oil found in nature, but is instead manufactured by machine. The fatty acids are extracted through an industrial process of fractionation and concentrated into MCT oil. The logic is that since MCTs are healthy, the more the better. However, lauric acid (C12) is totally void, or present only in minuscule amounts in MCT oil. This has caused much debate on the matter. One side argues that MCT oils don’t include lauric acid because it is rare and more costly to include, and the other side argues that C12 is a less efficient way to obtain energy and adds nothing extra to the product. MCT oil makers advocate using only C8 and C10 (or 100% of one or the other) because they are the most rapidly metabolized for energy. Choosing between coconut oil and MCT oil, or deciding which one is better, should not be a concern when you understand the differences. On one hand, coconut oil is high in lauric acid which has well-documented health benefits, and MCT oil has very little to offer in that way. On the other hand, MCT oil may help raise energy levels better than coconut oil, but little proof is available to validate this claim. If you do plan to use an MCT oil, be sure the label clearly lists the ingredients and discloses how it was produced. Many MCT oils are chemically altered and contain unhealthy fillers like polyunsaturated fats, and due to their refining process may use harsh solvents and chemicals in manufacturing. Storage and Shelf-Life Be sure to keep the infused oil in a container with a tight lid (insects and critters love it). A glass jar with a wide mouth works well so that you can scoop it out easily. The infused oil should be kept out of direct sunlight. It can be refrigerated, but it is not necessary. It can also be frozen, but freezing it will change the taste - sometimes for the better but sometimes for the worse. Coconut oil is very stable and depending on the kind, can last anywhere from 18 months to several years. Opinions differ on how long cannabis-infused oil can be kept. Most agree that degradation begins after 2-3 months, and sooner after repeated exposure to air (opening and shutting the jar) or overexposure to sunlight or heat. This does not mean it is unusable, but you will definitely start to notice a change in the taste and effectiveness as the cannabinoids begin to degrade.
Perfecting the ultimate balance between sweet and spicy, ginger cookies have long been a wintertime favourite. If you’re using cannabis infused butter, make the recipe as is. However, if you’re adding your cannabis oil directly, you may want to slightly reduce the amount of (non-infused) butter you are using to maintain the correct amount of moisture. This recipe makes two dozen medium-sized cookies, so you’ll need to add that many doses of oil during the butter and molasses stage. All of the spice amounts here can be reduced or increased based on your preference. If you don’t have all of these spices on hand, using a pre-blended pumpkin pie spice will work almost as well (maybe with a little extra ground ginger added for good measure).

Robyn Griggs Lawrence cares about your well-being. As a former editor of Natural Home magazine, she wrote a number of books on healthy living before making her foray into the culinary cannabis world. Her “Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook,” which has a foreword written by Women Grow co-founder Jane West, gathers wholesome recipes and tips from chefs across the country on making edibles that are vegan, vegetarian, raw and gluten-free. The book includes cameos from Scott Durrah, a co-found of Denver cannabis cooking company Simply Pure, and Catjia Redfern, co-founder of MegaMints, among others.


Basil traveled from Chicago to attend Feast and signed up for the Sugar High class because he’s “just fascinated by the whole phenomenon of edibles,” he said. He’s never cooked with cannabis before but figured if he came to Portland, a city known for pot, he might be able to pick up a few pointers. A carpenter by trade, Basil has dealt with carpel tunnel problems in both hands for the last few years. 
Slowly pour the tincture through the cheesecloth in to the jar. Be careful and do this slowly! If you rush, you run the risk of overfilling the cheesecloth and having a serious mess on your hands… And all over the rest of your kitchen too! Pour slowly. If the cloth gets too full of powder, change it. Once you’ve strained all of the mixture, squeeze the cheesecloth. A lot of glycerin gets stuck in there and if you don’t squeeze it, you’ll lose a lot of the product.
Mary Poppins wasn’t just blowing smoke when she sang, “Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.” There’s proof lining the shelves of dispensaries across the country, and the choices in infused edibles have never been better. But for some patients, it’s more complicated than choosing between Dr. Robert’s Chocolate Trip Cookie and Compassion Edibles’ Traditional French Chocolate Tainted Truffles. People with special dietary …
After assembling your materials, put your cannabis butter on low (REALLY LOW) heat on the stove the melt it. Take half of your Oreos and crush them up with the half of the Heath bars and add them to the butter. Put the other half of the crumbs on the inside of a 9×13 pan. Cover the crumbs as best as you can with the 1/2 gallon of ice cream. Then, take the butter and crumb mix and coat the top of the ice cream. Take your favorite flavor of syrup and cover the top layer. Stick this whole pan in the freezer and let it freeze. After a few hours, you’ll have a dank treat that will get you extremely baked… And taste so good!
As far as straining, I use a spatter screen (normally used over frying pans to stop spatter, they have a much finer weave than a strainer or screen colander). Just put it over the top of a pan and pour. Easiest way I’ve found and I lose way less oil than using any kind of fabric. After it stops dribbling, I press it, then pour boiling water through it and let drain then press again. Of course, anyone can rinse it as many times as they want, but one additional drain this way usually ends up with very little oil in the drained liquid, so I only do the one. I heat the water and oil again on a low heat, only up to a low boil, which mixes the oils, then shut it off and let it cool, gently transfer to fridge. When it is solid, lift it off the water and I have a translucent butter, very little color, almost no plant material because it settles, along with any other solids, on the bottom of the pan. If, by some chance, it comes out dark with material, it can be put in a half-gallon or so of water and heated again to a low boil, then shut off and left to settle and cool once more. Fridge it, when it’s solid, even cleaner butter.
Adding cannabutter or cannaoil to your tea may sound strange, but it actually results in a creamy, latte-like drink. As far as oil goes, coconut oil is the best choice due to the flavor and the fact that unlike other oils, it gets creamy when mixed up. Just brew a cup of your favorite tea and stir in the cannabutter or cannabis coconut oil until it’s mixed well. The result is a warm, comforting, medicinal cuppa, sure to make you feel good.
Once solidified, you now have awesome medicate lollipops that you can take everywhere you go! Remember, the amount of tincture in this recipe can be changed but you should always note that eating cannabis effects people differently than smoking. Therefore, be sure to test out the amount of THC you eat before just dumping your whole stash in to the mix!
Once you have BHO-infused butter, Catalano suggests a few easy homemade edibles. Make a quick honey spread for two pieces of toast by mixing a half-teaspoon of BHO butter with one tablespoon raw honey and a pinch of cinnamon. In sauce or stew recipes, use one half-teaspoon of BHO butter for each individual serving size. If you feel like baking, here’s an additional step to a baked apple recipe. When baking a large stuffed apple, use one half-teaspoon of BHO butter for each apple. That sounds delicious! XO
please help me with this confusion. Ideally, decarboxylation takes place at a temperature just over 200 for about just under an hour. This is accomplished in boiling water, which reaches and maintains about 212 degrees. So if I boil the herb at that temp for an hour, isn’t that decarboxylating it? Why do it in the oven first and then do it again in the saucepan? What am I missing?
In some ways, cooking with cannabis is just regular cooking, with a few adjustments for taste and technical considerations. The food can’t be cooked at temperatures higher than three hundred and forty degrees, because that would destroy the THC. “It’s been a little bit of a challenge cooking some foods that normally benefit from a really high heat start,” Wolf said. An example is fried chicken, which she recommends topping with infused oil or salsa.
Other components of the cannabis plant are in the hash oil as well. Traces of psychoactive THC and other cannabinoids are included to ensure the “entourage effect”. The entourage effect is the term given to the process of all available cannabinoids working together within the body to allow the desired effect to manifest. Thus, you should use High CBD Hash Oil with caution, be prepared for varied results, and take notes on how effective the ratio of CBD:THC is for your symptoms.
Obligatory Bob Loblaw Disclaimer: While cannabis is legal for recreational use in Colorado and Washington, as well as for medical use in 20 states and D.C., it is still technically illegal under federal law. Do this at your own risk. Also remember that edibles require longer to take effect (anywhere from 30 minutes to 3 hours) but hit way harder than smoking, along with longer lasting effects (anywhere from 2 to 8 hours depending on the strength of the butter and the number of brownies you just inhaled). Do not attempt to drive, operate heavy machinery, perform surgery, perform long division, or generally move further from your couch than absolutely necessary.

Adding water is optional not mandatory. I would not reheat with water at this point. Stain the plant material off, if you haven’t already. If there is a lot of sediment in the bottom you can optionally reheat gently over low heat and further strain through a mesh yogurt strainer to further clarify it, but again it is optional. Will it taste too weedy? That is a personal preference but it should likely be OK, especially if you use it in highly seasoned foods that have lots of other flavors going on (a coconut curry perhaps?). Good luck.
 In a small bowl mix together the canna-oil, honey, balsamic venegar, and 1/2 of the lemon juice. Once the vegetables are done cooking, remove from the oven and let cool for 3-5 minutes then pour the beautiful canna-oil mix on top and add the grated parmesean. Serve yourself up a heaping portion and see just how happy these veggies make you feel… And thats how to make roasted vegetables with marijuana, enjoy!
This first-ever cookbook from High Times magazine—the world's most trusted name when it comes to getting stoned—is the deliciously definitive guide to cannabis-infused cooking. Easy, accessible recipes and advice demystify the experience of cooking with grass and offer a cornucopia of irie appetizers and entrees, stoner sweets, cannabis cocktails, and high-holiday feasts for any occasion, from Time Warp Tamales and Sativa Shrimp Spring Rolls to Pico de Ganja Nachos and Pineapple Express Upside-Down Cake. Delectable color photos and recipes inspired by stoner celebrities such as Snoop Dogg, Cheech and Chong, and Willie Nelson will spark the interest of experienced cannabis cooks and "budding" chefs, whether they're looking for the perfect midnight munchie or just to take dinner to a higher level.
Nobody can deny that the combination of kush and OJ is the perfect way to start your day. Not everyone is a coffee drinker, after all. Plus, orange juice is better for you anyway. The following recipe will allow you to create an awesome orange drink that you can bring with you on a hot day as a nice medicated smoothie or you can drink it with your bowl of cereal as an awesome wake and bake. Whatever you choose to do, this drink is absolutely amazing… And medicated.
As far as straining, I use a spatter screen (normally used over frying pans to stop spatter, they have a much finer weave than a strainer or screen colander). Just put it over the top of a pan and pour. Easiest way I’ve found and I lose way less oil than using any kind of fabric. After it stops dribbling, I press it, then pour boiling water through it and let drain then press again. Of course, anyone can rinse it as many times as they want, but one additional drain this way usually ends up with very little oil in the drained liquid, so I only do the one. I heat the water and oil again on a low heat, only up to a low boil, which mixes the oils, then shut it off and let it cool, gently transfer to fridge. When it is solid, lift it off the water and I have a translucent butter, very little color, almost no plant material because it settles, along with any other solids, on the bottom of the pan. If, by some chance, it comes out dark with material, it can be put in a half-gallon or so of water and heated again to a low boil, then shut off and left to settle and cool once more. Fridge it, when it’s solid, even cleaner butter.

For every stoner out there who enjoys a joint there's another two who hate the smoke, but still enjoy the high. In these days of health consciousness, more and more people are giving up smoking. That's where the Cannabis Cooking Companion comes in. There are over 25 delicious recipes for Stoned Starters, Mashed Main Courses and Doped-out Desserts to make meals that are unforgettable and yet somehow hard to recall. There are guides to the science and history of cannabis in the kitchen, plus tips on making your own THC-laced tipples. Infamous names in cannabis culture have also supplied their favourite culinary delights. Sample such recipes as 'Mad-for-it Moroccan Mahjon', 'Holy Cow Hot Chocolate' and 'Lassi Come Home' and then just ...
Once solidified, you now have awesome medicate lollipops that you can take everywhere you go! Remember, the amount of tincture in this recipe can be changed but you should always note that eating cannabis effects people differently than smoking. Therefore, be sure to test out the amount of THC you eat before just dumping your whole stash in to the mix!
 Cut the avacodos into small chunks so that they’re easier to smash. Place them into a large mixing bowl and with a fork or bean smasher, let the smashing begin. (Smash to desired texture) Next cut the tomatoes, yellow onion, cerano chili, and banana peppers into small squares. Finely chop the beautiful cilantro. Add everything in with the avacodos and mix together lightly.
Seven years ago, when Colorado and Washington became the first states to legalize recreational use, Danny Schaefer saw a business opportunity. Schaefer wasn’t interested in growing or distributing cannabis, but he knew visitors would flock to Colorado to openly participate in a drug culture long forced underground. So he founded My 420 Tours, which bills itself as “the original Colorado cannabis tour.” They offer all-inclusive vacations that include pot-friendly hotels, growhouse tours, cannabis massages and sushi and joint rolling classes.
If you’re using a slow cooker, you’ll want to cook on low heat for at least 6 to 8 hours, but as long as 2 or 3 days if you want it really well infused and potent. If you’re using a saucepan, you’ll want to heat it for about half that time, but at least 3 hours. The longer you cook, the more the weed will infuse the oil. If you’re using the slow cooker, you don’t have to check it or mix as often. If using a saucepan, you’ll want to keep a close eye on it and mix frequently. You definitely don’t want it to boil over.
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