If you were looking for the perfect game-day snack to serve to all your pals, then search no more! This nacho cheese is creamy cheesy bliss and when the high kicks in while the game’s on it won’t matter if your team wins or not, either way you’ll be happy dipping crunchy chips into this dip again and again. Both canna-butter and canna olive oil can be used in this dip so be prepared for some pretty potent bites.
Basil traveled from Chicago to attend Feast and signed up for the Sugar High class because he’s “just fascinated by the whole phenomenon of edibles,” he said. He’s never cooked with cannabis before but figured if he came to Portland, a city known for pot, he might be able to pick up a few pointers. A carpenter by trade, Basil has dealt with carpel tunnel problems in both hands for the last few years. 
Two of the early taste-testers were her son, Nick, and his wife, Mary. Growing up, Nick was not a marijuana user. “I was a pure DARE kid,” he told me. His mother was disappointed—which was probably the point. “I was, like, ‘Come on! A little pot,’ ” Wolf said. “We were terrified that he was going to become a Republican.” Mary grew up in Oklahoma, where her father was an Episcopal priest. She met Nick while working in marketing for a financial firm in New York. When Wolf began making her almond treats, she gave the couple a few samples, along with a cookie from another baker. They made the mistake of eating the entire cookie before deboning a chicken. (They had joined a “chicken share.”) As the edible kicked in, Nick recalled, he began to get the impression that he was deboning a baby. “I was, like, ‘This feels like human skin! I can’t do this anymore!’ ” He spent the night curled up by the toilet. Mary was calmer. “I just left the chicken there and went to bed,” she said. The experience put them off edibles for months, and spurred Wolf to make a low-dose version of the almond bar, with only twenty-five milligrams of THC.
The number of people who think that sweets are the only kind of edibles you can make with marijuana consistently surprises me. The fact is most any food can be infused with cannabis. In fact, it is usually easier to hide the green herbal flavor that most people don’t like in spicy and/or savory foods. There are lots of terrific cannabis cookbooks on the market to help you expand you cannabis culinary repertoire, including my own Cannabis Gourmet Cookbook and The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. You can also find lots of recipes, both savory and sweet, on this blog.
The infamous weed brownie is infamous for a reason and incorporates two of the best things on the planet; brownies and weed. Brownies are a perfect baked good to share with friends and when you serve these they’ll be knocking down your door to get another taste of your bud brownies. Once you’ve whipped up a batch of these goodies, you might not be able to go back to regular box mix brownies again.

“There are two different compounds in cannabis. One is THC, that’s the psychoactive cannabinoid that gets you high,” Jeff says. “But the lesser-known ‘little brother’ of THC is CBD, and that is a non-psychoactive medicinal compound in cannabis. And that’s what people use to treat seizures, and scientific studies are starting to show that it kills cancer cells and shrinks tumors.”
Likewise, if you ever find yourself with a weak batch of food, eat more! If you make a batch of infused butter or oil that is less potent than you’d like, you can always augment it later by heating gently to dissolve some decarboxylated kief or hash into it before using in recipes.  I know marijuana is an expensive ingredient and the natural urge is to use as little as possible.  But think of it this way, you can always eat smaller portions, but if your batch of edibles does not deliver, there’s no way to avoid disappointment.  I won’t say that you “wasted” the weed as you will still be getting medicinal benefits even if you don’t feel high, but if you were expecting/desiring a buzz and you use too little, then you certainly did not put your plant material to its optimal use. Learn more about dosing at this link.
While I am here I would also like to ask about making tinctures and butter. The prescriptions I have for medical marijuana all have exact potency ratios. They have been tested and calculated. Once I decarb the leaf, and add it to the 190 proof Everclear, shake and sit for 5-10 days, strain and bottle. How do I dose it using eye dropper method? Ex: If I use leaf that is 30% THC and decarb it to extract all the THC? Is this potion 30% THC tincture or roughly close if I do it correctly? According to what ratio? For example, there are 50 drops in the bottle. How much THC is in one drop? ( 30% divided by 50? ) Or is each drop 30% ? I am so confused!! I know you have to test it on yourself a drop at a time and just see how it makes you feel.
Wolf told me that she, like many other people, sees an industry at a crossroads. Down one path is a future that resembles the wine business, or the farm-to-table movement: boutique pot growers turning out harvests that reflect local climates and customs. Down the other is Big Weed: industrial farms, joints by Marlboro and pot cookies by General Mills, Monsanto patenting genetically modified strains of Purple Kush. Wolf had already observed the corporate interests circling.
Stir together the brown sugar, salt, and melted cannabis butter. Mix together well, at which point you should add in the corn syrup. Continue to stir the mix while slowly adding in the milk. Be sure that all ingredients are getting blended together well. Put this mixture in a pot and place on the stove over medium heat. Let this cook for 10-15 minutes, stirring occasionally. The ingredients should have taken on a firm texture, almost like pizza dough. Take the pan off of the stove and add in the vanilla that you have ready. After adding the vanilla, pour the entire mix in to a pan (Be sure to spray it with cooking spray first so nothing gets helplessly stuck). Let the pan cool off and you’re ready to cut your candies in to whatever shape you want. You can wrap them and give them to friends as special little medicated surprises as well!

The effects and duration of cannabis differ depending on how you take it. When you smoke pot, it passes very quickly from the lungs to the bloodstream. There is a rapid spike in THC in the blood minutes after inhalation, which declines after about an hour. But when you eat or drink it, it passes through your stomach and intestines to the bloodstream before entering the liver, where it’s metabolized and then spit back out into the bloodstream. This all takes time, which means that when you eat THC, it can sometimes take more than two hours to feel the effect—one that can last longer than from smoking, as the THC is gradually absorbed over hours by the gut, liver, and so on. So, while the experience is different from person to person, it’s safe to say that when you eat cannabis, it will take longer to feel the effect and that that effect can last longer than when smoking it. The lag time can also lead to overindulging.

5. Refrigerate the amber liquid overnight. The butter will rise to the top and become firm again. Scoop the butter from the top, and voila! Your Cannabutter is ready to use in any of your favorite recipes as a butter or oil substitute. Keep the remaining amber liquid to cook with, as it will contain residual THC. Use it in sauces or to boil noodles – the sky’s the limit.

 In a small bowl mix together the canna-oil, honey, balsamic venegar, and 1/2 of the lemon juice. Once the vegetables are done cooking, remove from the oven and let cool for 3-5 minutes then pour the beautiful canna-oil mix on top and add the grated parmesean. Serve yourself up a heaping portion and see just how happy these veggies make you feel… And thats how to make roasted vegetables with marijuana, enjoy!
kief: Flickenger appreciates that kief is more potent than regular decarbed bud (making it a more economical ingredient), and also that it cuts down on prep time. “There’s no need to strain, like when you’re using fresh bud,” he says. “There’s no need for people to have it in a Crock-Pot for six hours or strain it through pantyhose to make sure every little bit gets out.”

Generally speaking, lower cooking temperatures are better. THC is completely degraded at temperatures in excess of 392 degrees F although it starts to break down long before that. Since water boiling never gets above 212 degrees F, I always recommend adding water when making cannabis infusions (see point 2 above).  You will also need to pay attention to cooking temperatures when using the infused butter and oils, or when cooking with marijuana concentrates. Do not use infused marijuana oils for direct sautéing for frying. If you are making something battered, make sure the medicated part is inside the batter. You can cook at oven temperatures up to 375 degrees F, as the food itself will not get that hot.
Cannaoil in your smoothie? Yes! Due to its reputation as a superfood and the creamy texture that results from blending coconut oil, it has become a popular addition to smoothies. There are a lot of recipes out there but you can experiment by adding a tablespoon of cannabis coconut oil or less if your infusion is strong (5-10 mg is a good starting point) to your favorite smoothie recipe.
No matter which one you buy, the first 30 or so pages will be the same, offering a beginner’s guide to weed, a dosing guide and recipes for oil and butter, the building blocks of almost every edible. Once the cookbooks lay out the basics, they can get into the good stuff: eggs benedict for breakfast, a New York strip for dinner, and plenty of snacks and cocktails in between. And most of the time, these recipes are good enough to prepare without cannabis.

Conceptually, the process of making edibles is very similar to that of cannabis concentrates; the goal being a pure, therapeutic combination of cannabinoids and terpenes. The primary difference is that edibles typically utilize a food-grade solvent like coconut oil (or another fatty substance) as opposed to a hydrocarbon like butane to extract the cannabinoids from the starting material. There are literally hundreds of ways to make edibles, and most of them will ‘work’ to some degree. However, what really makes this recipe so effective is the increased bioavailability of the cannabinoids – in essence, how easy it is for your body to absorb the THC, CBD and other beneficial compounds.

Successful website The Stoner's Cookbook already helps marijuana-loving cooks with their archive of hundreds of thousands of cannabis-infused recipes that include meals, snacks, drinks, and desserts. They are now compiling their most popular recipes into a "high-class cannabis cookbook [that] will make history." The book, titled HERB: Mastering the Art of Cooking with Cannabis, has already been featured in a New York Times article and boasts almost 3,000 pre-orders in anticipation of its November 2015 release date. The 200-page book will not only feature hundreds of recipes (like butternut squash soup and a seared bone-in ribeye), but it will also teach readers the science behind marijuana, extraction methods, and medicinal purposes.


Pros: It is impossible for our bodies to feel high off of skin contact with cannabis infused oil so any psychoactivity associated with THC will not be felt by the user. However, every bit of the medicine is available to the body. Human skin absorbs up to 90% of what it comes in contact with (hence reapplication of sunscreen) so the medicine is immediately available and fast acting.
Conceptually, the process of making edibles is very similar to that of cannabis concentrates; the goal being a pure, therapeutic combination of cannabinoids and terpenes. The primary difference is that edibles typically utilize a food-grade solvent like coconut oil (or another fatty substance) as opposed to a hydrocarbon like butane to extract the cannabinoids from the starting material. There are literally hundreds of ways to make edibles, and most of them will ‘work’ to some degree. However, what really makes this recipe so effective is the increased bioavailability of the cannabinoids – in essence, how easy it is for your body to absorb the THC, CBD and other beneficial compounds.

First, as always, preheat your oven to 350 degrees and be sure to put a center rack in the oven. Grease a 10x3in Bundt pan and sprinkle flour all over it. This will prevent the cake from sticking to the inside of the pan once it’s finished. You don’t want the cake to get stuck. It’ll make a mess and you will ruin your cake. It is also important that you leave all of your ingredients sitting out at room temp for at least 40 minutes before you start baking. This includes the eggs, buttermilk, and butter.


I followed Wolf into a back room, where Mary was at work, wearing a green apron decorated with the Laurie & MaryJane logo. They’d been hired to provide the desserts for a cannabis dinner party, and Mary was testing some miniature pumpkin pies. She pulled a baking sheet full of pies from a cooling rack. “I used one of Laurie’s recipes from the Cannabist,” she told me. “We’ll have to taste it to see if the flavor is right.”
Summer is almost upon us. What’s a better snack in the warmer times of the year then fresh vegetables dipped in ranch dressing? Of course, veggies aren’t as awesome as junk food but since most stoners these days are pretty health conscious, I figure that a few of you could definitely use this recipe yourselves! The dressing can also be used on salads, sandwiches, or any other cool summer snack. It only takes a few hours to make so even the most stoned stoner can prepare and enjoy this medicated ranch dressing.
Set aside two tablespoons of hemp seeds in a small owl. Take the remaining hemp seeds, cacao powder, salt, and walnuts it to a small food processor and pulse for 10 seconds until the mixture is finely ground. Take half of the dates and the vanilla extract and add them in. Puree everything for about 15 seconds and then move it to a mixing bowl. Form 15 to 18 small meatball sized balls and roll them in the remaining hemp seeds to give the a nice covering. Set the balls in a container and let them sit in the fridge for about two hours. You can enjoy them then or wait and store them in the fridge like stated above! Enjoy!

Using cannabis as a medicine begins with understanding the basic science of decarboxylation, and why it is a crucial process in making edibles, tinctures and topical treatments. To get the full medicinal value out of your cannabis, it needs to be heated to a temperature that is just not possible to obtain in the human digestive system. The major downside of decarboxylating is that some of the more volatile terpenes (and other aromatics) that give the plant its signature aroma and flavor are lost during the process. Adding an equal amount of raw material to the decarboxylated materials may improve the taste and/or smell of your creations, but learning how to properly decarboxylate cannabis from the get-go will save you a lot of time, energy, money and product when cooking with cannabis.

It seems like there’s a Marley family member in every branch of the weed industry, and food is no exception. Bob’s eldest daughter, Cedella, is the author of “Cooking with Herb,” a cookbook focused on how the health benefits of cannabis can benefit a holistic lifestyle, whether it’s eaten or consumed in some other way. True to the family’s Jamaican roots, the book is full of Caribbean recipes for dishes like saltfish, jerk chicken and spicy Jamaican patties. But it’s not just a cookbook; Cedella’s volume also features wellness tips and directions for making your own beauty products.
The first chapter of the book is the basic recipes, such as THC oil, cannabutter, tinctures, glycerites, marijuana flour, etc. This is the most important and most useful section of the book. Much like the five French mother sauces, once you've figured out how to make these base items, the rest of the book is pretty much the same as any other cookbook. In fact, you could probably adapt just about anything you'd find in the Joy of Cooking by replacing the oil or butter with an infused version.
Extracts, or concentrates, are exactly what they sound like—products with high levels of THC that are made from cannabis by a number of methods, from sifting buds to isolate cannabinoid-rich trichomes,to supercritical CO2 extraction, which uses carbon dioxide at very high pressures to pull cannabinoids from the plant. (This professional technique is a popular way to decaffeinate coffee.) There is a dizzying array of extracts available, as well as ways to consume them, from vaporizing to smoking them atop traditional bud. And some have found their way into the kitchen.
 Cover them with plastic wrap and let it sit in the fridge for about 2 hours or longer. (The longer it chills in the marinade the better the taste and the high) After the time passes, preheat your grill to high heat and pour some of the chicken juice on the grill to oil it up and further cook the flavor into the legs. Now put the chicken on the grill and pour the rest of the mixture over top it right after throwing it on the grill.
Thank you so much. I’m pretty creative and enjoy making my own lotions, soaps, etc., so this is really a super fun thing for me to do. I’ve been making vape liquid with PG & VG, but it hasn’t been super strong. I’m having surgery next week and will not be able to vape at all so I’m trying to produce a more concentrated and THC-packed oil I can use sublingually. And I prefer not to use alcohol. The dispensary nearest me does not have oils available as of yet.
Once your wings have been chilling in the fridge and you’re ready to bake them preheat your oven to *425 degrees. Lightly grease a cookie sheet with olive oil or cooking spray and set aside.  Melt a ½ cup of cannabis butter on low heat. Once your cannabis butter is melted turn heat off and whisk in ½ cup of hot sauce. Separate your hot sauce and cannabis butter mixture equally into 2 separate small bowls and set aside.
Christmas is less than a week away and you’ve got to get your cooking in order before the guests start to arrive! As I always say, dessert is the most important part of the holiday season… Or you can just give these little treats away as gifts, as there are plenty of people who would love a tray of truffles for Christmas! No matter what you’re doing with these medicated treats, you’ll be sure to fall in love!
Set up a double boiler (take a large mason jar and a large saucepan and fill the pan about half way with water). Take your coconut oil and chips and add them to the mason jar, letting the chips slowly melt. It’s important to do this slowly so that you won’t lose any THC from the oil or butter that you’re using. Once the chips are melted, add in your Karo syrup. Be sure that everything is mixed (once the chips have melted fully, you can move the mixture to a bowl but you have to be quick because the liquid solidifies quickly once the heat source is removed) and then pour the mixture in to a saran-wrap lined 8×8 pan. Be sure that the saran-wrap covers the sides of the pan that you’re using so that the candy doesn’t stick. The wrap should overhang far enough that you can now wrap the top of the saran-wrap over the candy, fully covering it. Let the candy sit out overnight.

At the end of the day, however, a great marijuana cook has to have a great pot brownie. “Once Mary came into the business, we tested about eight different brownie recipes,” Wolf said. They tried one from the back of a brownie-mix box and one that Wolf had learned at the Culinary Institute of America. Nigella Lawson’s brownie was delicious, but too mild to counter the weedy taste of canna-butter. Finally, they settled on an adaptation of a “fudgy” brownie developed by a magazine-editor friend of Wolf’s, Freddi Greenberg. Wolf’s version includes extra vanilla and cocoa as “flavor disguisers.” She uses a short baking time, to create a gooey interior. Last year, the cannabis Web site Leafly held a pot-brownie contest to coincide with college basketball’s March Madness tournament. Recipes from Martha Stewart, Mario Batali, and Julia Child faced off against pot-oriented recipes from publications like Edibles List and High Times. Wolf’s brownie won. The Cannabist called it “among the most heavenly creations known to ganja-loving humanity.” Wolf said, “It’s pretty fucking delicious, I have to say.”
Oregon, where Wolf lives, legalized recreational marijuana in 2014. Four more states followed suit in last fall’s election: California, Massachusetts, Nevada, and Maine. More than twenty per cent of Americans now live in states where recreational weed is legal. President Trump’s appointee for Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, is an opponent of marijuana and is widely seen as a threat to the industry. But over the long term, proponents argue, the country is on a path toward legalization. (Last week, Canada’s Prime Minister unveiled a bill, which is expected to pass, legalizing recreational marijuana in that country.) Amy Margolis, Wolf’s lawyer and one of Oregon’s most prominent cannabis advocates, said, “I think we’re seeing an extremely rapid sea change in the way people perceive the safety of cannabis use and the legalization process. There are other issues that have followed the same trajectory, like gay rights—all of a sudden you see the switch flip.”
Slice the bananas in to small 1″ slices and roll them around in the budder that you’ve melted and lemon juice mixture. Do this to all of the bananas and then lightly coat them with the toasted coconut. The budder/lemon mix will make the coconut stick to the banana easily. This recipe is super easy and can be made by pretty much anyone. Enjoy your banana treats!
and it is a gift to us to be savored and enjoyed ! When I make a butter I want people to know there’s weed in it I want it to be green I wanted to be smelly and I wanted to taste like something , I think personally you’re confusing the details of *smoking weed with the details of *eating weed yes chloroform and all that other stuff you mentioned is very bad when it comes to smoking like if you were making a hash or an extract you would definitely want to use a method that results in fewer of these but when it comes to cooking those things are good for you they have tremendous health value and you’re only screwing Yourself by cutting out the flavor and the health benefits. you’re coming across like some kind of a Stoner burn out the way your talking about this stuff .

Funny is relative. Funny rotten, throw it out. Funny like weed strain and use. Did you use water, if so this would increase chances of something growing that you don’t want in there. If it is just oil and cannabis and the cannabis in submerged, you might be OK. If you stored it in the fridge, you should be fine either way. I could not tell for sure unless I saw and smelled it. But when in doubt, my motto is always to toss it out. Sorry.
Before you start baking or cooking, you want to calculate the potency of the edibles you plan on making. It is easy to calculate, especially if you know the THC potency of your concentrate (see above to calculate your total THC). A full gram (1000mg) of concentrate with 65% THC is 650 mg of THC in your wax. In a half gram (500mg) with 65% THC you will have 350mg of THC.
Since I generally like to take microdoses of cannabis (about 10mg or less) throughout the day when I need to medicate, I’ve never really delved into the world of making ridiculously strong cannabis oil or butter. I realize that some people need stronger medicine, but those people aren’t me, and I don’t have the tolerance to test strong oil without getting really really really messed up, so I never did it.
If you have the luxury of being able to obtain your medicine from a legal dispensary near you, you may have noticed the large selection of edibles that are beginning to overflow the shelves. These pre-made, pre-packaged cannabis infused treats are more accessible to patients nowadays than ever before, but unfortunately many edibles still come packed with sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and other unhealthy ingredients. While these processed food delights can be an easy way to get medicated on the go, many medical marijuana patients prefer making their own medicated snacks and infused meals — and for good reason. Join us as we explore all of the popular cannabis cooking techniques and become a master chef in no time!
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