This delicious Tokyo style dessert snack puts bananas in a league all their own and is sweet in all the right ways. With the added canna-flour, these fried bananas would workd great for medicinal patients who’d like to releive pain and eat good at the same time. It’s pretty simple to prepare and might just have you hooked eating your high fried banana style.
This product can also be placed on top of a standard bowl of cannabis flowers. The oil melts down when heat from a lighter is applied and coats the bowl with a gooey, flammable crust. If the High CBD Hash Oil catches fire just snuff it out and try to keep a rolling cherry (constantly hot and smoking bowl) to maximize the amount of medication consumed.
Heat up your grill on low/medium heat and cut your peach in half. Coat the fruit with the cannabis coconut oil that you have and sprinkle cinnamon over the halves. Put a piece of tinfoil on the grill and once it is warm enough, place the peaches on for about five minutes. They should be warm but not too hot. If they get too hot, they will turn to mush so be careful to keep an eye on them. While the peaches are grilling, you can quickly gather the ingredients for the balsamic vinaigrette. Put all of the greens in a large bowl and top it with the blackberries.
There are two main ways to achieve this objective; juicing high-THC strains or consuming an edible made from hemp derived CBD. We’ve written the guide to juicing cannabis here – all you need is some fresh plant material. If you don’t have access to raw cannabis plants, we suggest a high-CBD edible like the Full Spectrum Tinctures or Gel Caps from Ambary Gardens. These products are created using a very similar process to the one outlined above, only with hemp as opposed to high-THC cannabis. They even utilize MCT coconut oil for increased bioavailability – simply put, Ambary makes the best CBD-rich edibles on the market and they can ship to all 50 states.
Now that we’ve gone over cannabis-infused oils, let’s dive into their similarly monikered cousin: cannabis oil. Similar to olive, vegetable, or coconut oil, cannabis oil is made through a chemical extraction process. There are a variety of methods that the marijuana industry uses to extract oil, resulting in similar but unique products. Most cannabis extraction methods involve a solvent, like butane or CO2—or extreme heat and pressure—to extract the cannabinoids. These processes can be time-consuming and usually involve expensive laboratory equipment. Without proper training and the right tools, extracting THC from weed using certain methods is downright dangerous. Unless you’re using a solventless method, the excess yield—or product that isn’t cannabis oil—needs to be removed in order for a clean, non-toxic final result. For those of us who aren’t chemistry experts, most methods of this process should be left to the professionals.
This is my first batch. I used 1oz manicured ground cured bud in 1lb of butter. I put both in a slow cooker plus a cup of water. I set the cooker to the lowest temp for the longest time. Next day, I poured the butter & bud (water evaporated) through a tea strainer into a pyrex measuring cup. I had no cheesecloth and I suspect I’ll want to strain the cannabutter again before I put it in (Cook’s Illustrated Classic) Brownies. We will make the brownies next week. Wish us well.
Regrind the unground parts. The unground parts left in your strainer need to be reprocessed. If you have a coffee grinder, send them through a second time. If you are not getting the result you hoped for or if you started with a food processor, move the unground parts to a mortar and pestle. Apply pressure with the mortar and "stir" the unground parts to produce the necessary grinding action.
That’s right. Cinnamon cannabis oatmeal cookies. Oatmeal isn’t the most popular flavor of cookies but cinnamon roll is something that most people agree is amazing. On a scale of 1 to 10, this recipe comes in at about a 3 for difficulty, meaning that pretty much anyone is capable of accomplishing the task of making these. They’ll also get you pretty stoned, an added bonus. These will do well at a party or a gift for a friend and they’re the perfect recipe to begin your cannabis culinary adventure. Whatever you choose to do with them, you’ll love the way they taste!
After assembling your materials, put your cannabis butter on low (REALLY LOW) heat on the stove the melt it. Take half of your Oreos and crush them up with the half of the Heath bars and add them to the butter. Put the other half of the crumbs on the inside of a 9×13 pan. Cover the crumbs as best as you can with the 1/2 gallon of ice cream. Then, take the butter and crumb mix and coat the top of the ice cream. Take your favorite flavor of syrup and cover the top layer. Stick this whole pan in the freezer and let it freeze. After a few hours, you’ll have a dank treat that will get you extremely baked… And taste so good!
And here’s a secret, for those of you that live on the west coast, I know how much you appreciate thousand island dressing and you can make your own using this medicated mayo by adding in equal parts of ketchup and relish. You may have to mess around with how much of each you add but once you get the consistency right, you will end up with an amazing medicated condiment that you can pretty much put on anything. You’re welcome!
In a legal state, home cooks have access not only to lab-tested fresh product but sometimes also to lab-tested butters and oils. Some who prefer to infuse at home rely on online potency calculators, of which there are several. Sites like Wikileaf catalog the potency of different strains, and home potency-testing tools are starting to hit the market.
 Make sure the pan you plan to use is nice and hot before you start adding batter. You can use 1/3 to 1/2 of a cup to determine how much should be poured into the pan. When your pan is hot enough, begin pouring in the batter and be ready to flip it when you see bubbles popping up throughout the batter. For even more simplicity, pour the batter into a waffle maker. Now all that’s left to do is grab the syrup and enjoy the most important meal of the day while cheesing from ear to ear, Marijuana Waffles!
All cannabis oil packaging must also state the percentage of THC and CBD in the oil (so you know how potent and psychotropic it is before you use it). Just like strains of dried cannabis, oils can have stronger concentrations of CBD, THC, or be more balanced, and thus create very different experiences. Not all oils are created equal – so reading the packaging is crucial for your first time. 
Strain the oil.[5] Do this while the oil is still hot for best results. You can strain the oil using a wire strainer to remove the larger pieces of marijuana. If you still have solids you want to get rid of, strain a second time through a coffee strainer. This will take a lot of time so be careful and patient. You may want to do small batches while you continue to simmer the mixture.
One of the newest ways people are enjoying cannabis is by combining it with cocktails and mocktails. This is especially popular at dinner parties in the any states where cannabis has recently become legal for recreation. But, with a strong taste and a particular method of infusion necessary, beginners may not know how best to make cannabis cocktails. This book has a collection of 75 cannabis drink recipes by “The Cocktail Whisperer” Warren Bobrow. It also includes a full history of cannabis as a social and medicinal drug. You will find recipes not only for cocktails but for shrubs, bitters, butters, oils and even coffee, tea and milk-based drinks for the morning hours. This is a really fun book for anyone who loves drinks and cannabis.
Take four cups of the chocolate chips and mix in the weed, then melt it in the microwave. Only keep the mix in the microwave until melted. Avoid letting the mix bubble. Once the chocolate has melted, remove the bowl from the microwave and add in the water, coffee, and cream cheese. Mix together well. Chill the mixture in the fridge for about an hour until it is firm enough to roll in to small balls, measuring about an inch. Place these on a sheet of wax paper and place in the freezer for an hour.

First, melt the cannabutter in the microwave. Do this in short increments. If the butter is exposed to too much heat, some of the THC will escape and the butter won’t be as potent. While you’re melting the butter, combine the peanut butter, oats, cinnamon, cocoa, and honey in a larger bowl. Once the butter has completely melted, add it to the bigger bowl and stir everything together.
Beverage connoisseurs will delight in Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails & Tonics, an informative collection of cannabis cocktails and medicinal drinks that, when released, was a top selling book at Tales of the Cocktail (the largest cocktail festival in the world). Mixologist Warren Bobrow, the author of a handful of other cocktail recipe books and creator of the blog The Cocktail Whisperer, artfully pairs the fascinating science behind cannabis chemistry with detailed instructions on how to make stimulating tonics, bitters, syrups, herbal infusions, and more to create a book that any drink and cannabis enthusiast would be excited to check out.
Anytime. Glycerin is tougher than alcohol to get a strong tincture as it is just not as efficient as extracting. I am going to be working on glycerin tincture instructions to update my cooking course after we launch the new topicals course. Depending on your needs and tolerance level, you may do fine, just be aware it likely won’t be as strong as the same tincture made with alcohol.
As to how much bud to use, that depends on how strong you want the oil. The recipes on this site use 1/2 ounce (14 grams) per one cup of oil or butter. That said, when cooking for myself, I use double that amount. I have a high tolerance, but even for those who are “lightweights” making stronger infusions allows you to use less of them in order to get the same dose. Less infusion in the finished recipe means better flavor. If you haven’t already, my free online Dosing class at http://www.Cannademy.com can help you fine tune and adjust your recipes for what you need. If you are unsure of how much you need, please see this article to determine your ideal dose, because everyone is different and not just a little different.
Robyn Griggs Lawrence cares about your well-being. As a former editor of Natural Home magazine, she wrote a number of books on healthy living before making her foray into the culinary cannabis world. Her “Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook,” which has a foreword written by Women Grow co-founder Jane West, gathers wholesome recipes and tips from chefs across the country on making edibles that are vegan, vegetarian, raw and gluten-free. The book includes cameos from Scott Durrah, a co-found of Denver cannabis cooking company Simply Pure, and Catjia Redfern, co-founder of MegaMints, among others.
The day after the dinner party, Wolf picked me up in her car, a Kia Soul in a shade called kale green. “The perfect Portland color,” she said. Despite her affinity with the city, she still thinks of herself as a New Yorker, and seems to enjoy shocking West Coast sensibilities. “People here are so earnest,” she said. “I once told a group of people someone’s baby looked like a tampon. They were, like, ‘I’ve never heard anyone say that out loud.’ ”
For every stoner out there who enjoys a joint there's another two who hate the smoke, but still enjoy the high. In these days of health consciousness, more and more people are giving up smoking. That's where the Cannabis Cooking Companion comes in. There are over 25 delicious recipes for Stoned Starters, Mashed Main Courses and Doped-out Desserts to make meals that are unforgettable and yet somehow hard to recall. There are guides to the science and history of cannabis in the kitchen, plus tips on making your own THC-laced tipples. Infamous names in cannabis culture have also supplied their favourite culinary delights. Sample such recipes as 'Mad-for-it Moroccan Mahjon', 'Holy Cow Hot Chocolate' and 'Lassi Come Home' and then just ...
Pour the mixture through the fine strainer, in to a large bowl and discard any solids that are left behind in the strainer. Place this bowl in the fridge and leave it uncovered for an hour, stirring it occasionally. Then, place plastic wrap over the top of the mixture and let it chill for another 12 to 24 hours. After that amount of time has passed, pour the cold mixture in to a 1 1/2 quart ice cream freezer container. Stick it in the freezer for three hours and then stir in the vanilla wafers and the lime juice. Put the container back in the freezer for another six hours or until the mixture has become firm. Let the ice cream stand for five minutes before serving it. Enjoy!
The bigger issue is having too much THC, because if you have too much of that, the negative effects are pretty pronounced—you'll have anxiety, you'll get paranoid, you'll feel horrible, get nauseous, throw up, and then the next day you'll feel hungover and know you had a really bad experience. You don't want that. You have to know the percentage you're starting with, and then you have to know how that nets out in the butter or oil that you infuse it into.

Regrind the unground parts. The unground parts left in your strainer need to be reprocessed. If you have a coffee grinder, send them through a second time. If you are not getting the result you hoped for or if you started with a food processor, move the unground parts to a mortar and pestle. Apply pressure with the mortar and "stir" the unground parts to produce the necessary grinding action.
Since I generally like to take microdoses of cannabis (about 10mg or less) throughout the day when I need to medicate, I’ve never really delved into the world of making ridiculously strong cannabis oil or butter. I realize that some people need stronger medicine, but those people aren’t me, and I don’t have the tolerance to test strong oil without getting really really really messed up, so I never did it.
Cooking is a huge part of the holidays for most people. The main course is definitely important but what would that be without those delicious added bonus foods? Side dishes are always very important for the holiday meals. Everyone knows that mashed potatoes are probably the best part of any holiday. Take, for example, these mashed grapefruit sweet potatoes that also happen to be medicated. They taste good and get you high. With a very simple recipe (on a scale of 1 to 10, we give it about a 3), these sweet potatoes will be a hit at at any table this holiday season.
Another reason to use this technique is without water in the mix, the plant material tends absorbs too much of the oil.  This means usable product is going into the trash, a problem that’s reduced when adding water.  The increased liquid volume also gives cooks the option to add more plant material in order to make more concentrated infusions if they wish.
I have a question regarding the slow cooker temperature for infusing. I’ve decarbed the cannabis and wondering if a rice cooker’s temperature is sufficient. I have a little tart warmer-type pot and wonder if that is hot enough. After an hour of heating water (for temp-testing purposes) it has reached 160 degrees F and remained at that temperature still at 90 minutes.
Decarboxylated cannabis can (and has been) infused into a spectrum of household ingredients, from avocado oil to bacon fat, although some may be better conduits than others. In a trial where she infused and tested a number of vehicles, McDonough found that clarified butter and coconut oil produced especially potent solutions. Her hypothesis as to why? Saturated fats like butter and coconut oil are better able to absorb THC than monounsaturated fats like olive oil. “We’ll need to do more study,” she writes, “but in the meantime, all of you cannabis cooks at home can rest assured that using clarified butter or coconut oil for your cannabis infusions will result in a potent and cost-effective infusion.”
Seven years ago, when Colorado and Washington became the first states to legalize recreational use, Danny Schaefer saw a business opportunity. Schaefer wasn’t interested in growing or distributing cannabis, but he knew visitors would flock to Colorado to openly participate in a drug culture long forced underground. So he founded My 420 Tours, which bills itself as “the original Colorado cannabis tour.” They offer all-inclusive vacations that include pot-friendly hotels, growhouse tours, cannabis massages and sushi and joint rolling classes.

All of this has produced a new category of cannabis user: people trying it for the first time, to see what the fuss is about, or coming back to it after a decades-long hiatus. Businesspeople see a future in which cannabis is part of a functional, even aspirational life style. Like Julia Child introducing Americans to French cuisine, Wolf serves as both a guide and an ambassador to this world. She was a chef and a food editor for many years, and she stands out as a source of reliable information in a nascent industry without dependable methods for cooking and dosing. Ricardo Baca, the founding editor of the Cannabist, told me, “Laurie represents a voice in the food-and-cannabis space that can be trusted.” Her columns are full of global ingredients and lush food photography meant to attract what she calls “the CB2 and West Elm crowd.” Her books would not seem out of place on the shelf next to the latest tome from the Barefoot Contessa or Yotam Ottolenghi. Evan Senn, the editor of the California-based cannabis magazine Culture, told me that, increasingly, foodies are the target audience for pot. “I love to drink wine, and I’m kind of a snob about it,” she said. “I’m not going to drink Franzia out of a cardboard box. I’m going to buy a nice bottle of Pinot Noir and aerate it and enjoy it. I have the same approach to edibles.”
Cannabis infused cooking oils, commonly referred to as canna oils, are popular among many medical marijuana patients and caregivers looking to infuse everything from salad dressings to dipping sauces to baked goods. Most oils are vegan-friendly and extremely easy to add into recipes with savory meals like steak or chicken. Additionally, infused cooking oils may serve as a healthy substitute for butter in many recipes. These factors make marijuana-infused cooking oils a must-have for most medical marijuana patients when it comes to cooking with cannabis at home. How to Make Cannabis Infused Cooking Oil (Canna Oil) Ingredients 6 cups extra …
Topicals don’t make it into your bloodstream, just into your cannabinoid receptors, and can be great for localized pain. Under the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (ACMPR) in Canada, licensed producers of medical cannabis can’t currently manufacture or distribute topicals – but with the distribution of oils, it’s possible for you to make your own (with carrier oils and other bases for creams.)

Creating cannabutter or cannaoil at home is a simple process no matter which oil you choose. The trickiest part can be getting the ratio of oil to bud just right. A common canna oil ratio is 1 cup of oil to 1 ounce of ground marijuana. For cannabutter, your ratio would be 1 pound of butter to 1 ounce of weed. Although widely used for many years, the need for so much cannabis in your recipe is primarily due to the high cannabinoid loss that comes with attempting to decarboxylate (or activate) during infusion. An ounce of flower testing at 18% THCa decarbed in your Ardent Decarboxylator will yield approximately 5,040mg of THC!
The following day, the candy should have hardened in to a taffy like substance, not too hard but not too soft. If the mixture hasn’t gained the correct consistency, continue to let it sit out until it does. Once the mix has the taffy consistency that we all love, you can cut it in to pieces and wrap them individually in wax or cellophane. Give them out as treats or hoard them all for yourself! Either way, enjoy your awesome taffy candy!
Wolf is sometimes called the Martha Stewart of edibles. The designation owes something to superficial similarities. At sixty-two, Wolf resembles a crunchier version of the domestic icon: she has an ample figure, graying hair, and glasses, and she wears loose linen outfits, generally paired with Crocs. But the designation also refers to her role as an educator, schooling people on how best to cook with marijuana. She is the author or co-author of several cookbooks, including “Herb,” which seeks to “elevate the art and science of cooking with cannabis” and “The Medical Marijuana Dispensary,” which features soothing dishes, like stuffed sweet potato, that will get you stoned. Her recipes appear in all the major cannabis publications: High Times, Dope, and Culture, as well as the Cannabist, a Denver Post Web site devoted to the booming legal-marijuana industry. There you can watch her instructional videos on making infused delicacies like the creamy chicken-based Mama Leone’s soup. (“This soup is worth its weight in weed.”)
If you’ve ever used a tincture and tried to mix it in a drink, you’ve probably noticed it doesn’t mix all that well. Why? Pot isn’t water soluble; it’s oil soluble. So you’ll do best using a high-fat oil, like coconut oil or canola. You can even use olive oil. Keep in mind, however, that canola has a higher boiling/smoking point than coconut and olive oils.
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