Sayegh is at the forefront of a growing movement to reimagine cannabis in the kitchen, and he’s become known for his many-coursed gourmet THC-infused dinners in a style he describes as “French with Italian and Middle Eastern influence.” But tonight his gingerbread construction—which he’s created for a party benefitting the victims of a warehouse fire in Northern California—is just for show. Sayegh hasn’t lab-tested the village, so he doesn’t know how potent it might be, and he won’t serve imprecisely dosed food. Once upon a time, the menu included cannabis-infused appetizers to appease guests salivating over the off-limits village, but it turns out cocktails are on offer at this party, and mixing cannabis edibles with liquor can make for a “dizzy” experience, he says; he doesn’t serve them together. Guests still partake of his hors d’oeuvres, but they’re made solely from non-mind-expanding ingredients. Navigating such things are all part of the job; complications traditional chefs have never pondered.
Hello from England. Thanks for your article. I’m completely new to this, and found this very helpful. I’ve been given some solid hash but as I don’t smoke, eating is obviously the way forward. To avoid any smell in my house (we have teenage children) could i bake it in a sealed oven bag? If yes, would this affect times and temps? Thanks for your help.

Hi, I used 15g of quality stuff here in Hawaii, 2 cups coconut organic oil and 2 tablespoons of litchen granules. Spelled in wrong. Anyways I decarb in the oven for 30 min at 240, put everything in crock pot on a low for most the day and keep warm for some sitting occasionally. I cooked for 10 hours strained and chilled. Used it later that the next day in brownies and cookies adding 1/2 cup to a gluten free brownie mix, and and 3/4 cup to chocolate cookies. I ate two cookies. It only felt a little bit but I was high all day. Should this be enough for decent edibles or will I have to eat a lot?
Cooking is a huge part of the holidays for most people. The main course is definitely important but what would that be without those delicious added bonus foods? Side dishes are always very important for the holiday meals. Everyone knows that mashed potatoes are probably the best part of any holiday. Take, for example, these mashed grapefruit sweet potatoes that also happen to be medicated. They taste good and get you high. With a very simple recipe (on a scale of 1 to 10, we give it about a 3), these sweet potatoes will be a hit at at any table this holiday season.
While historians have found recipes involving weed dating back to 15th century Europe and even 10th century India, pot brownies were introduced to pop (or should we say “pot”?) culture in the 1968 movie “I Love You Alice B. Toklas.” Objectively, the most common way to make weed-laced snacks is marijuana butter, but baking with cannabis oil can be even more effective. While these two products have many similar uses and come from the same plant, they’re produced and used in very different ways.
Cannabis Now contributor Laurie Wolf sells small batch cheese crisps and brownie bites at Oregon dispensaries. But if you’re not in the state, her cookbook will help you replicate those treats — and tons of others — at home. With elevated recipes for dishes like a tomahawk ribeye and bruschetta with ricotta and peas, this is the book you should turn to if you’re prepping an elegant dinner party. In fact, “Herb” has been called the “the authoritative volume on how to cook with cannabis” by celebrity chef Michael Ruhlman — who won a James Beard Award for his own book — so you know it’s good.
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Perfecting the ultimate balance between sweet and spicy, ginger cookies have long been a wintertime favourite. If you’re using cannabis infused butter, make the recipe as is. However, if you’re adding your cannabis oil directly, you may want to slightly reduce the amount of (non-infused) butter you are using to maintain the correct amount of moisture. This recipe makes two dozen medium-sized cookies, so you’ll need to add that many doses of oil during the butter and molasses stage. All of the spice amounts here can be reduced or increased based on your preference. If you don’t have all of these spices on hand, using a pre-blended pumpkin pie spice will work almost as well (maybe with a little extra ground ginger added for good measure).
Hi, I used 15g of quality stuff here in Hawaii, 2 cups coconut organic oil and 2 tablespoons of litchen granules. Spelled in wrong. Anyways I decarb in the oven for 30 min at 240, put everything in crock pot on a low for most the day and keep warm for some sitting occasionally. I cooked for 10 hours strained and chilled. Used it later that the next day in brownies and cookies adding 1/2 cup to a gluten free brownie mix, and and 3/4 cup to chocolate cookies. I ate two cookies. It only felt a little bit but I was high all day. Should this be enough for decent edibles or will I have to eat a lot?
I toned this recipe down a little bit because it was way too strong. When I made it, I used 1 gram hash to 1oz oil or butter, so a 1 to 1 ratio does technically “work”, it’s just really really really really really really really really really really really strong. I cut it in half for those of you who would like to function at a base level (walking, talking, etc).
"The Easy Cannabis Cookbook is a critical resource to understand, in simple terms, the history and the science behind cannabis and the way we are hard wired to interact with it. Perhaps, more importantly, it is also a practical guide on how to safely incorporate phytocannabinoids nutritionally into the human diet the way evolution has decided it should be."―Dr. Lakisha Jenkins, Traditional Naturopath, Registered Master Herbalist
With an easy and more precise dosage method, medical cannabis oils are ideal for oral consumption. However, they can be just as effortlessly added to what you’re eating. Because our extraction process includes decarboxylation, there is no need to decarb the oil on your own before cooking like you have to with dried flower. This means you can just add the oil to basically anything without any fuss or extra time. To add your oil into a food, simply measure your dosage as you normally would do with the syringe and add that specific amount to your recipe. If you’re cooking for one, you only need one dose. If you’re making a large batch, multiple your single dose by how many servings you are creating. (For example, if you’re making a dozen brownies you’ll want to add twelve times your single-use dose.) Ensure you mix thoroughly to distribute your medical cannabis evenly throughout your recipe.
Marijuana butter and cannabis-infused oil can be ingested in a variety of ways. Once you’ve created the product, it can be used as a cooking ingredient for any recipe—minding that most baked goods work best with butter. However, one thing to consider is the temperature of the dish you’re preparing—heating the marijuana butter or oil to temperatures exceeding 245 degrees Fahrenheit will burn the THC. For a more simple application, the butter can be used as a spread on toast or even just dosed orally by itself. Some choose cannabis-infused oil as a medicinal ingredient in topical salves, lotions, and ointment, as it can be absorbed through the skin once it has gone through the decarboxylation process.

Hi This is one of my fave articles so far on cooking. I am just about to try all this the first time. I have a very pretty plant I grew and she is ready to start drying. Can I take a small amount of the bud after a couple of days of drying and decarb it before its all the way dried and cured and use it? Thanks again for answering the questions. I was able to read through and other people asked the same things I would.

Here’s what I would do to try to salvage it. Filter the sludge out as much as possible, use a cheesecloth-lined strainer or even better a fine mesh bag like used for making nut milks. Then put the remaining butter and water in a container and put it in the fridge or even freezer. The butter should separate and harden on top. Hopefully, you will still have something you can use. It’s probably not going to taste very good, but you should be able to salvage something.

Let's just say you took your weed and put it into a crock pot, like a lot of people do, with some butter, oil, and water and let it simmer. What you're really doing, in addition to simmering all of those cannabinoids into the butter and oil, is also adding in any impurities that are in that bud. So anything that tastes really bad could be something as horrible as insecticides, or it could just be the chlorophyl, which also has a specific taste that's pretty powerful.
As to “mud” I would have had to see it to be sure what the cause is. Was there dirt or roots in the mix? Actual dirt should be gently washed off – gently you don’t want to remove trichomes. If not, it sounds like maybe the plant material was too finely ground. I know a lot cooks recommend grinding the plants finely (and the Magic Butter Machine does it automatically). But I have found it is better to just rough grind as if you were rolling a joint, or even just crumble the plant material with your fingers. What you are trying to extract is ON the plant, not within it, and I find that over grinding just adds extra plant material and green taste to the final product.
Successful website The Stoner's Cookbook already helps marijuana-loving cooks with their archive of hundreds of thousands of cannabis-infused recipes that include meals, snacks, drinks, and desserts. They are now compiling their most popular recipes into a "high-class cannabis cookbook [that] will make history." The book, titled HERB: Mastering the Art of Cooking with Cannabis, has already been featured in a New York Times article and boasts almost 3,000 pre-orders in anticipation of its November 2015 release date. The 200-page book will not only feature hundreds of recipes (like butternut squash soup and a seared bone-in ribeye), but it will also teach readers the science behind marijuana, extraction methods, and medicinal purposes.
Full article reprinted with permission from America's Test Kitchen. The piece originally appeared online at the Cook's Science website. Author Andy Wright is a writer based out of San Francisco. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Matter, Popular Mechanics, Atlas Obscura, Pacific Standard and other publications. She is the former deputy editor of Modern Farmer. Learn more at her website, Twitter and Instagram.

Hello from England. Thanks for your article. I’m completely new to this, and found this very helpful. I’ve been given some solid hash but as I don’t smoke, eating is obviously the way forward. To avoid any smell in my house (we have teenage children) could i bake it in a sealed oven bag? If yes, would this affect times and temps? Thanks for your help.


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Edibles provide a way to consume your hash oil that affords the opportunity to activate the psychoactive cannabinoids.  You need only put your hash oil into your edible at the right time and temperature if you have some cooking expertise.  If you don’t, you can still enjoy great edibles.  Just prepare some hash oil butter first, then add to your food as you choose.
I have been a few batches of High THC cookies when I started making “vegan” cookies for a few friends.Simply put.I used clarified unsalted butter.Well with little extra moisture,I burnt the bottoms of the 1st batch.So I figured.I would try 1,It fucked me up,But tated burnt.The next batch.I said fuck it & cooked them for less time.BIG DIFFERENCE..In cookies,hey will reach the 350 F temp & you will start burning off your THC.BUT in Brownies,which are thicker & moister,the inside doesn’t reach 350 F,so you don’t burn any THC off…When I’m ready to make cookie ONLY ,I decarb my bud at 240 for 20-30 minutes in a Pyrex (name brand- I use a glass pie pan).COVER with foil.Check at 25mins.Then ever 5 minutes.Do not go over 45 mins.Leave to cool COVERED in the glass pan.THUS when cooking,the bud will finish decarbing.FOR ANYTHING ELSE THRN COOKIES….ITS 240 FOR 30-40 MINS,,CHECKING AT 30 MINUTES,45 TOPS .after 45 minutes,you’re burning it off.Beening doing this this was for over 30yrs.
Other components of the cannabis plant are in the hash oil as well. Traces of psychoactive THC and other cannabinoids are included to ensure the “entourage effect”. The entourage effect is the term given to the process of all available cannabinoids working together within the body to allow the desired effect to manifest. Thus, you should use High CBD Hash Oil with caution, be prepared for varied results, and take notes on how effective the ratio of CBD:THC is for your symptoms.
Once you’ve infused your oil, it’s time to strain out the plant material. Cheesecloth is often recommended because it allows oil to pass through while separating it from the ground plant material, but only if you let gravity do the straining for you. Don’t squeeze the cheesecloth to get every drop of oil out. Milking it like this will push out a little more oil but a lot more plant material.
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