This is a very important, but often overlooked step in the edible baking process. For those who are unfamiliar, the cannabinoids present is your starting material likely exist in their acidic, non-activated form. What does this mean? It means that THCa (‘a’ signifies acid) for instance, maintains many of the therapeutic properties associated with THC but NOT its psychoactive properties. Thus, if you desire the typical ‘high’ associated with edibles, you need to decarboxylate, or activate, your cannabinoids prior to infusing. Although the decarboxylation process begins immediately following the plant’s harvest, it must be accelerated with heat to ensure that all of the cannabinoids have converted from their acidic to their activated forms. For reference, this same process of decarboxylation is what occurs when you light up a one hitter or joint of cannabis.
Remove from oven and allow to cool fully before removing the foil. Depending on the material you use, it may be fine enough and require no further processing. If not, you can place the material in a food processor or blender, pulsing the cannabis until it is coarsely ground. Be careful not to over grind the material, as you do not want a super fine powder.
If you’re using a slow cooker, you’ll want to cook on low heat for at least 6 to 8 hours, but as long as 2 or 3 days if you want it really well infused and potent. If you’re using a saucepan, you’ll want to heat it for about half that time, but at least 3 hours. The longer you cook, the more the weed will infuse the oil. If you’re using the slow cooker, you don’t have to check it or mix as often. If using a saucepan, you’ll want to keep a close eye on it and mix frequently. You definitely don’t want it to boil over.
Wolf pulled a Mason jar of infused olive oil from a shelf and encouraged me to smell it. It had a powerfully green scent. “Olive oil infuses beautifully,” she said. “It’s very earthy.” A jar of infused canola oil, on the other hand, smelled like bong water. Wolf had used the infused olive oil to make the stuffed mushrooms as well as a spinach tart. Those who wanted even more weed could slather their food with an infused feta sauce made with olive oil, garlic, parsley, and red onion. “Strong flavors help conceal the taste,” Wolf said. “It is a challenge to keep the foods from tasting like cannabis. That’s probably the hardest thing about making edibles.” Dessert was a “mildly infused” strawberry trifle in a big glass bowl. For palate cleansers, there were frozen grapes—an old standby for Wolf. “They’re wonderful when people get stoned,” she explained.

Edibles can be made using nearly any cannabis product; buds, trim, kief, solventless hash, solvent-based concentrates, or reclaim. we have even used the washed trim from an ice water hash extraction to make edibles. Just note that the quality and potency of your starting material will play a large roll in the strength of your edibles. Thus, edibles made from cured, ground buds will be significantly stronger than the same batch derived from already-been-vaped (ABV) buds. Be mindful of whether your starting material is indica, sativa, or hybrid so you can anticipate the effects it will induce. You can also seek out starting material with a specific cannabinoid profile, i.e. selecting the ratios of THC and CBD that induce the desired effects and are effective in treating your symptoms or ailment. Note that CBD-only edibles will be non-psychoactive, whereas THC-rich edibles are very psychoactive. If you only have access to high-THC starting material and you seek relief without the psychoactivty, we recommend juicing raw cannabis.


I am a teetotaler, I don't drink, smoke or do drugs, but I also have no problem with other people doing whatever they want with their own bodies. I also consider myself to be a fairly competent chef, and combined with the fact that this book was only $3, I thought it might be an interesting read. Additionally, my grandfather died from wasting syndrome secondary to pulmonary fibrosis; had medical marijuana been available he probably would have lived several years longer and I'd have likely needed to learn how to prepare medicinal edibles.
Not only are hemp hearts an extremely nutritious part of a diet but they are also gluten free and are considered a raw food, plus they never contain allergens. The hearts aren’t nuts either, leaving them to be enjoyed by basically everyone. They can be eaten raw like peanuts or added to snacks like cereal, yogurt, or fruit salad. Taste-wise, they resemble sunflower seeds so if you enjoy those, you’ll definitely love the taste of hemp hearts. And if you don’t, simply juice them and drink them as a shot. It may taste bad but the health benefits are worth you taking a shot of something that doesn’t taste very good!
Wolf, the younger of two children, grew up in Riverdale, a wealthy neighborhood in the Bronx. Her mother, a teacher, could be “extremely uptight,” she told me. Her father, a dentist, had anger issues. Good food was in short supply, as was good fun. “Looking back, I realize my parents were not at all happy with each other,” she said. She attended Calhoun, at the time an all-girl’s school, in Manhattan. One day, an administrator called to inform her parents that several girls were suspected of having smoked marijuana. Her mother rightly guessed that Laurie was one of them. “I got home to find her crying hysterically,” Wolf said. “She was, like, ‘How did I go wrong? You’re an addict! You let us down!’ ”

Conceptually, the process of making edibles is very similar to that of cannabis concentrates; the goal being a pure, therapeutic combination of cannabinoids and terpenes. The primary difference is that edibles typically utilize a food-grade solvent like coconut oil (or another fatty substance) as opposed to a hydrocarbon like butane to extract the cannabinoids from the starting material. There are literally hundreds of ways to make edibles, and most of them will ‘work’ to some degree. However, what really makes this recipe so effective is the increased bioavailability of the cannabinoids – in essence, how easy it is for your body to absorb the THC, CBD and other beneficial compounds.
Wolf told me that she, like many other people, sees an industry at a crossroads. Down one path is a future that resembles the wine business, or the farm-to-table movement: boutique pot growers turning out harvests that reflect local climates and customs. Down the other is Big Weed: industrial farms, joints by Marlboro and pot cookies by General Mills, Monsanto patenting genetically modified strains of Purple Kush. Wolf had already observed the corporate interests circling.
In the early days, Wolf tried selling baklava at Oregon dispensaries, which baffled the medical-stoner crowd. “We were catering to the lowest element of pot smokers,” Wolf said. Since then, the audience has changed: sophisticated consumers are known today as “cannasseurs.” They appreciate savory foods, not only because savories avoid cliché—“everybody infuses desserts,” Wolf said—but also because many medical-marijuana users are diabetic, or avoiding sugar for other reasons. Wolf recommends having a bottle of infused salad dressing or pesto on hand. “Infusing a pesto is so easy,” she said. “You can make a bunch and toss it with noodles, and you’ve got a delicious meal.”
Hello from England. Thanks for your article. I’m completely new to this, and found this very helpful. I’ve been given some solid hash but as I don’t smoke, eating is obviously the way forward. To avoid any smell in my house (we have teenage children) could i bake it in a sealed oven bag? If yes, would this affect times and temps? Thanks for your help.
Corinne Tobias, a home cook who writes about cooking with cannabis on her blog Wake + Bake, described an experience in which she ate half of an infused grilled cheese sandwich and got “super crazy ridiculously messed up.” She wrote that she felt like she was “melting into the floor” and spent “half of her afternoon” asking for reassurance that she was not dying. “When I first started cooking with cannabis,” she writes, “I had no idea that it was going to be such a struggle to predict the perfect dosage. I’d make oil using the same method, but every time I harvested a different strain, my cannabis oil would be stronger or weaker and I had to spend a day or two as a human guinea pig, slowly testing my oil until I knew it was just right.” Now she is a fan of the tCheck, a $299 home potency tester.
Cannabis Now contributor Jessica Catalano is another strain-specific chef — in fact, she’s the world’s first. She first started posting recipes on her Ganja Kitchen Revolution blog in 2010, choosing strains based on the complementary flavors they add to non-medicated ingredients. The website inspired a book of the same name, where Catalano recommends adding Blue Cheese to biscuits, Pineapple Kush to a piña colada, and Sour Diesel to a Lebanese tabouli. If you can’t afford the book, Catalano still posts plenty of free recipes to her blog.
Disclaimer: Our products have intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of cannabis infused products. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

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Studies show cannabidiol (CBD) has tremendous medical potential, especially in the treatment of seizure disorders and pediatric patients. Indications also suggest CBD lowers blood sugar, which makes it desirable for treating diabetes. Its sedative properties make it useful in the treatment of stress-related and sleep disorders. CBDA and CBD are non-psychoactive. Unlike THCA and THC, converting CBDA to CBD will not make a psychoactive product. CBD has a calming effect. This makes it ideal for treating children, the aged or patients that prefer less psychoactive effects. THC vaporizes quicker than CBD, so decarboxylating higher CBD varieties may produce higher CBD-enriched material. However, if you are not using a high CBD strain, extending the heating process may accomplish no more than burning off the THC.
This author is clearly NOT a cook or baker. Too many questions left unanswered in these recipes, such as "place the dough in a greased pan". How big and what kind of pan? Placed doesn't tell us if one should roll out the dough, pat down into the pan or what the dough should appear like when its done? Too much is left to chance here, including NO measurements for some ingredients! If one is already good at baking, one can possibly wing it with these recipes, but who wants to do that with their weed?
Remove the dough from the fridge and let it heat up for a few minutes before rolling it. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Flour a flat surface and roll the dough until it is 1/8th of an inch thick. Stick the dough back in the fridge for about 5 minutes. This will make it easier to cut the cookies out with your gingerbread (or whatever shape) cutter. Cut out your little gingerbread people and place them on an ungreased baking sheet. Stick them in the over until they are crisp, but not crispy. They should be a really nice gold color. Probably around 10 minutes or so. Take the cookies out and let them cool. Proceed to decorate them how you’d like!
 First smash the bananas in a large bowl and then add the eggs, sugar, canna-flour, salt, baking soda, and walnuts. Mix all the ingredients in together and pour mixture into your buttered baking tin. Put it in the oven and let it cook for an hour. Once it’s done you get to bite into chewy, nutty, banana bread that not only fills your stomach but gets you baked too! Enjoy Marijuana Banana Bread!!
Marijuana-infused edibles are an enduring classic in the world of cannabis; especially popular among those who need a smokeless option for consumption. Since PA state law only allows production and sale of cannabis oils at this time, we receive many inquiries about cooking edibles with concentrates. In addition to state law limitations, determining your dosage can also be challenging when baking with cannabis flower, whereas with concentrates it can be measure a lot more accurately.

Laurie & MaryJane’s brownies went on sale in February. They come in packages of five, which sell for twenty to thirty-three dollars, depending on potency. Wolf currently has them in thirty-five dispensaries and has developed new products: an almond-cake bite, a chocolate truffle, and a soon-to-be-launched savory cheese crisp. Ultimately, she hopes to conquer Oregon—and then to try for California. “The dream is to be everywhere it’s legal,” Wolf said, sounding a bit Big Weed herself. “To be the Mrs. Fields of cannabis foods.”
Strain the butter and refrigerate. Choose a storage container for your butter. Cover the top with cheesecloth[8] for straining. Use a rubber band around the top of the container to hold the cheesecloth in place. Pour the mixture through the cheesecloth into the container. Squeeze the solids to get as much butter out as possible. Store in an airtight container in your fridge for later use.
No matter which one you buy, the first 30 or so pages will be the same, offering a beginner’s guide to weed, a dosing guide and recipes for oil and butter, the building blocks of almost every edible. Once the cookbooks lay out the basics, they can get into the good stuff: eggs benedict for breakfast, a New York strip for dinner, and plenty of snacks and cocktails in between. And most of the time, these recipes are good enough to prepare without cannabis.
Robyn Griggs Lawrence cares about your well-being. As a former editor of Natural Home magazine, she wrote a number of books on healthy living before making her foray into the culinary cannabis world. Her “Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook,” which has a foreword written by Women Grow co-founder Jane West, gathers wholesome recipes and tips from chefs across the country on making edibles that are vegan, vegetarian, raw and gluten-free. The book includes cameos from Scott Durrah, a co-found of Denver cannabis cooking company Simply Pure, and Catjia Redfern, co-founder of MegaMints, among others.
Melt the cannabis butter in a small saucepan over low heat and blend in remaining ingredients. Stuff the turkey and/or season it with salt and pepper, if desired. Make a small incision in the skin of the turkey. Force a finger through the slit and break the contact between the skin and the meat. Using a meat injector, squirt half the butter mixture under the skin. Cook the turkey according to your favorite method, basting it with the remaining butter mixture every half hour until it’s done. We cooked it on a Traeger grill and it was juicier and more moist than any turkey I have ever had before.
In addition to infusing butter and oil with bud, you can infuse it with kief for a very potent infusion. If you’re not familiar with kief, it’s the sticky bits of resin you see on buds. It has a high concentration of cannabinoids but when cooked, it doesn’t impart the cannabis flavor like using the whole flower. In addition, kief butter needs an even quicker infusion and you don’t need to strain plant matter out of your finished product. Again, because of the high concentration of cannabinoids in kief, this makes a very potent oil so start small with your dosage.
Last fall, the food writer Laurie Wolf invited me to a dinner party at her home. It promised to be a master class in rustic entertaining. Wolf lives in a floating house on the Willamette River, just south of Portland, Oregon. When she has people over, she told me, she has a few rules for herself. First, “have as much done in advance as possible.” She goes so far as to set the table the night before and put out serving platters with sticky notes assigning their contents. Next, be sure to check your guests’ dietary requirements. These days, everybody has a health concern or a food allergy, and she says, “I always try to accommodate in a big way.” Some of Wolf’s recommendations are more esoteric. For example: “Start with a sativa and end with an indica.” This applies only to Wolf’s area of expertise: marijuana edibles.
To smoke hash oil with a spliff, add the hash oil when rolling on top of the herbal weed.  This is a good way to add a kick to cheap pot.  It may take some practice to get it smoking properly.  It’s also possible to add on top of the weed in a bowl.  Dab it on to the side of the bowl to avoid it saturating the intake, but not too close to the side as to miss the weed, as pure oil is more likely to catch fire.  You want it between the intake and the bowl edge, on top of the weed.
I love the taste of smoked or vaped cannabis. I do not like the taste of it in my food. Most people do not, but I know a handful of folks who do. But from a culinary/flavor profile/foodie perspective, most often the flavor of cannabis does not enhance most recipes. Your taking offense to this is the equivalent of getting mad at someone because they don’t like the flavor of broccoli, or beer, or whatever. It’s just silly. If you like it, more power to you, cannabis cooking is a whole lot easier for you. But most of my readers do not like a strong cannabis flavor in their food and neither do I.
Long considered a closeted activity, cooking with cannabis isn’t just for the super stoner anymore. As legalized marijuana use – for both medicinal and recreational purposes – continues to gain support across the country, home cooks are starting to incorporate cannabis into everyday meals. Yes, some people just want to get buzzed. But others want to alleviate chronic pain, lessen anxiety and sleep better. And they want to do it without smoking.
The bigger issue is having too much THC, because if you have too much of that, the negative effects are pretty pronounced—you'll have anxiety, you'll get paranoid, you'll feel horrible, get nauseous, throw up, and then the next day you'll feel hungover and know you had a really bad experience. You don't want that. You have to know the percentage you're starting with, and then you have to know how that nets out in the butter or oil that you infuse it into.
Cooking with premade concentrates is also an art that takes a little practice to get right. Cooking with kief is fun and easy. Its fine texture dissolves almost instantly in liquids and fats, sometimes even at room temperature. Hash, however, will take a little preparation, and this also depends on its consistency. Dry hash can be put in a food processor to grind it. The sticky variety needs to be heated until it melts.
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