The recipes in this book are quite different than what I was expecting, but are delicious nonetheless. The instructions for making cannabutter/ghee and cannaflour are very useful, though in practice not always as easy as stated. All the recipes are very easily adapted to exclude the cannabis, and are very good on their own. Many recipes call for adding fresh pot to the dish (e.g. tossing ground buds into a salad, or stirring some into guacamole), and the taste can be quite strong. This cookbook isn't for someone just looking for brownie and cookie recipes. Many dishes included are somewhat labour intensive, but are certainly beneficial for medicinal marijuana patients looking to maintain a steady level of THC in their bodies, as the book contains recipes for any time of day. I would suggest trying a recipe out first without the pot, to work out any kinks. The recipes are meant to replace smoking marijuana (as that was the author's goal), so the proportions might seem a bit staggering at first. It's hard to watch 1/4 oz. get turned into hot chocolate, but that's why I suggest trying the recipes out pot-free first. It's easier than wasting good bud on a dish you don't like. All in all, it's a good cookbook, with well-thought-out recipes, and many interesting facts about cannabis and the people who've made history in the world of pot.
Our products have intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of cannabis infused products. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.
Cannabis has anti inflammatory properties, which when applied in a salve, will prevent your body from rushing to heal the wound. The rush of white blood cells to the injury is the cause of the scar and the anti inflammatory slows that process down. The scar doesn’t form as badly and while it is still there, won’t be as rough when it finally finishes healing.
Andrea Drummer is a Los Angeles-based culinary school grad and private chef specializing in cannabis cooking. Maybe because of her culinary training, the book is short on the science of cooking with cannabis and long on recipes, including some fun ones such as kimchi fried rice and escargot in puff pastry. This is both good and bad, as the recipes for infused stock, pasta dough and mayonnaise are comforting for home cooks, but the book doesn’t give much information about how to work with or use cannabis. (There’s also no index, which is frustrating.) Although Drummer gives bud pairings, as if she’s talking about a good Cabernet, decarboxylation isn’t even mentioned; recipes simply call for grams of “cannabis product.” This assumes a lot, and unless you’re already versed in this kind of cooking, you’ll need outside reference in order to use this one properly.
Adding water is optional not mandatory. I would not reheat with water at this point. Stain the plant material off, if you haven’t already. If there is a lot of sediment in the bottom you can optionally reheat gently over low heat and further strain through a mesh yogurt strainer to further clarify it, but again it is optional. Will it taste too weedy? That is a personal preference but it should likely be OK, especially if you use it in highly seasoned foods that have lots of other flavors going on (a coconut curry perhaps?). Good luck.
High Times Magazine is well known and definitely well loved by marijuana aficionados all over the globe. They have been reporting on cannabis culture for decades, and have become the world leader in cannabis entertainment. They even have their famous Cannabis World Cup each year, which draws thousands of enthusiasts to sample different strains and celebrate cannabis in all of its different forms.

Corinne Tobias, a home cook who writes about cooking with cannabis on her blog Wake + Bake, described an experience in which she ate half of an infused grilled cheese sandwich and got “super crazy ridiculously messed up.” She wrote that she felt like she was “melting into the floor” and spent “half of her afternoon” asking for reassurance that she was not dying. “When I first started cooking with cannabis,” she writes, “I had no idea that it was going to be such a struggle to predict the perfect dosage. I’d make oil using the same method, but every time I harvested a different strain, my cannabis oil would be stronger or weaker and I had to spend a day or two as a human guinea pig, slowly testing my oil until I knew it was just right.” Now she is a fan of the tCheck, a $299 home potency tester.

“It depends on if you’re in a state where you can legally access it, or if you’re in a prohibition state,” says McDonough. Most cookbooks and guides provide a way to evaluate the quality of your cannabis and give it a ballpark THC percentage, which will help the home cook calculate it. “It’s better than nothing, but it’s still not very precise,” she says.

First, as always, preheat your oven to 350 degrees and be sure to put a center rack in the oven. Grease a 10x3in Bundt pan and sprinkle flour all over it. This will prevent the cake from sticking to the inside of the pan once it’s finished. You don’t want the cake to get stuck. It’ll make a mess and you will ruin your cake. It is also important that you leave all of your ingredients sitting out at room temp for at least 40 minutes before you start baking. This includes the eggs, buttermilk, and butter.
Yes indeed, it is important to dose homemade edibles accurately! First, let’s cover a couple of points about butane hash oil (BHO), safety and health. Double-check the laws to make sure you are legal to make BHO at home. The Colorado state law (HB 15-1305) that went into effect in July 2015 bans the manufacturing of marijuana concentrates by an unlicensed person using “an inherently hazardous substance” such as flammable butane. Unlawful manufacturing is now a Class 2 drug felony.
A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America and current contributor to The Denver Post and Cannabis Now, Laurie Wolf is the founder of Laurie & Mary Jane — a website that sells products made with medical marijuana. According to Publishers Marketplace, she is currently putting together a cookbook titled My Cannabis Kitchen: Recipes for Modern Marijuana Cuisine that will include a guide to edibles made from medical marijuana. Published by Quarry Books, the cookbook does not yet have a release date.
To store the mixture, you must first gently uncap the jug (don’t disturb what’s at the bottom) and put the tubing in to the jug, stopping about an inch from the bottom. Siphon the contents through the pipe, into the clean glass jug, through the muslin to make sure that no sediment gets through. You can toss out the old jug, along with the gross mess of stems at the bottom. Cap loosely and leave this jug alone for one month. Don’t move it or shake it. After a month has passed, siphon this jug in to the smaller, clean bottles from before, again through a layer of muslin. Seal them well. But you’re not going to enjoy your wine yet. You have to age it so put the bottles in a dark place and leave them for as long as you possibly can, even as long as six months to get the most out of your wine. After that time period, you should have a great tasting cannabis infused wine! Enjoy!
States that have legalized recreational use, including Colorado and California, have reported in recent years an uptick in marijuana-related emergency room visits, because inexperienced users often over indulge. In Colorado, for example, the state recommended dosage is 10 milligrams of THC. But for Schaefer, an experienced user, “that is way too potent for me.” 
 Using a large mixing bowl or an electric mixer you want to sift in the baking powder, baking soda, salt, cocoa, sugar, and canna-flour and mix them well. In another mixing bowl begin adding the wet ingredients, eggs, vanilla, buttermilk, and vegetable oil and mix on low speed in an electric mixer or whisk together briskly by hand. Next slowly pour the wet ingredients into the dry ones while simultaneously mixing everything together. Once you have your mix, stir in the coffee with a rubber spatula as not to “over mix” your batter.
Thank you for pointing that out. I will go in and rewrite to avoid confusion. You DEFINITELY want to decarb if the hash will not be cooked. If you are using hash in a cooked dish, the process of cooking can decarb it, HOWEVER, for maximum potency I recommend decarbing first in either instance. A medical marijuana provider friend of mine in WA state did an experiment by making 2 pans of brownies. In one he used kief that had not been decarbed, in the other kief that had been decarbed. Even though the process of baking the brownies will debarb some of the THC, he found the pan of brownies made with the kief that had been decarbed, lab tested about 30% higher than the other. SO my motto is decarb first in either instance.

Your recipe will need to contain either a fat or an oil-based ingredient that can be infused with the cannabis concentrate. Such fats include butter, ghee, lard, shortening and other vegetable or nut oils. If your recipe does not list a “fat” ingredient, you can dilute the cannabis concentrate in a small amount of your favorite spirits: vodka, rum, cognac, etc.

So to take the taste out, you basically have to extract as much of that stuff as possible by soaking the bud for a couple of days in distilled water, and then after that, blanching it. By blanching, you're basically getting a much purer flower to start with and later to infuse into your butter or oil. It's still going to smell like cannabis, but if you cook with it, you won't taste anything. Most canna-butters are usually green or even black. Mine is yellow.
I love the taste of smoked or vaped cannabis. I do not like the taste of it in my food. Most people do not, but I know a handful of folks who do. But from a culinary/flavor profile/foodie perspective, most often the flavor of cannabis does not enhance most recipes. Your taking offense to this is the equivalent of getting mad at someone because they don’t like the flavor of broccoli, or beer, or whatever. It’s just silly. If you like it, more power to you, cannabis cooking is a whole lot easier for you. But most of my readers do not like a strong cannabis flavor in their food and neither do I.
For those who prefer to avoid smoking or vaporizing cannabis, cannabis infused edibles are a great solution. In fact edibles represent one of the fastest growing product categories among medical and recreational dispensaries nationally. Nearly 5 million edible products were sold in Colorado alone in 2014. For those living in less tolerant states, you can make your own edibles at home with surprising ease. In this guide we will cover how to make edibles, how to determine dosage, and why the high associated with edibles feels so strong.
This recipe is super simple and the only other step that you need to take is putting them in the freezer. You have two choices. You can put the whole bowl in the freezer and let them freeze in a large mass. This method is good if you prefer to eat ice cream right out of the tub. Just make sure that you have a good container that seals well. The other way that you can go about this is to roll the mixture in to small balls and freeze them that way. Whichever method you choose, this treat will cure hunger and get you baked!

The first step in any weed bake is to choose a high-quality strain of weed, then make it super-strong by decarboxylating it, which is a fancy word that means to bake it on a baking sheet at 240 degrees for 25 mins to an hour, depending on how much weed you’re using for making edibles. This will concentrate the bud and convert more of the cannabinoids to the potent thc that you want.

Because marijuana in food takes longer to metabolize, it will take longer for it to affect you. Expect to feel the effects in about 30 minutes to an hour.[16] Expect the effects to last longer as well compared to smoking. You will not get the same effects due to the differences in how the body absorbs the cannabinoids. Be careful not to overdose by overeating when the effects are not as strong as desired.
First, add in the flour, baking soda, and spices. Sift them together well. Take a mixer and beat the butter and sugar together until fluffy. Use something electric for this so you don’t hurt yourself. Add in the eggs and the molasses after that. Slowly add in the flour and separate the dough three times. Wrap each one in plastic wrap and put in the fridge for an hour.
If you prefer to use butter next time instead of oil, the preparation is virtually identical, but you’ll want to start out with a single stick of salted butter and you’ll want to simmer it between 8 to 24 hours if using the slow cook method. Use about a quarter to a half ounce of weed per stick of butter. Butters can be great because it can be more versatile than cooking with oil. You can even add butter to your toast!
It’s clear that if you cook your weed, you get a longer, stronger, and more legal experience than smoking marijuana but there are a few cons. The most obvious is that you don’t get as acutely high from pot edibles as you do from smoking marijuana. The second con is that dosing is much easier smoking weed than it is with edibles. Overdosing on edibles can produce a frightening experience but is usually not physically dangerous. The third con is simply that it takes about an hour to feel effects of edibles.
If you have the luxury of being able to obtain your medicine from a legal dispensary near you, you may have noticed the large selection of edibles that are beginning to overflow the shelves. These pre-made, pre-packaged cannabis infused treats are more accessible to patients nowadays than ever before, but unfortunately many edibles still come packed with sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and other unhealthy ingredients. While these processed food delights can be an easy way to get medicated on the go, many medical marijuana patients prefer making their own medicated snacks and infused meals — and for good reason. Join us as we explore all of the popular cannabis cooking techniques and become a master chef in no time!

You deserve better than a limp joint and leftover pad Thai eaten by the light of the fridge. Live a little. Take that ganja and infuse it into butter, oil, milk, and sugar, and fuck around a bit. We're not talking boxed brownie mix; we're talking about a full-fledged gastronomical ball-out—apps, entrees, desserts, even some cocktails—that'll get you high and appease your munchies. Two birds, one stoner.
 Cover them with plastic wrap and let it sit in the fridge for about 2 hours or longer. (The longer it chills in the marinade the better the taste and the high) After the time passes, preheat your grill to high heat and pour some of the chicken juice on the grill to oil it up and further cook the flavor into the legs. Now put the chicken on the grill and pour the rest of the mixture over top it right after throwing it on the grill.

The basic process is to put your decarboxylated weed and butter in a pot with a little water just to make sure the butter doesn’t burn, and heat on a low simmer for 3 to 6 hours. Long as the butter doesn’t burn, the longer you heat, the more cannabinoids you get in the butter. Some prefer to heat in a crockpot to 6 hours. Let it cool enough to handle, strain out the plant material and discard (the thc is now inside the butter!), then put it in the fridge overnight for it to harden. Next, remove the hardened butter from the residual water and you have your main ingredient, your precious canna butter infused with powerful cannabinoids. For more specific instructions on making canna butter, view our detailed explanation on Making the Marijuana Oil here: https://www.ncsm.nl/english/information-for-patients/cannabutter-oil-recipe
There is no “high” from CBD, although both THC and CBD have many medicinal properties. When you make a butter or oil infusion you are infusing both these cannabinoids (along with many others) into the butter or oil, so yes you would get the benefits of both. How much of each will depend on the plant material you are cooking with and its individual cannabinoid profile. This varies widely from strain to strain. If you are using lab tested cannabis you will have a good idea of what to expect. While you can estimate a THC percentage (my free dosing course teaches you how), CBD is impossible to estimate without a lab test. Not only is the amount of CBD in each strain drastically different, you don’t physically feel the effects of CBD in the same way you do THC. Hope this all makes sense. Cheri
There’s so many stoners that love to wake and bake. The only thing that can be added to an awesome morning smoke session to make it better is coffee. Stoners love their coffee. What happens if you’re rushing though and you have to make a choice? Not anymore. Following this short recipe will provide you with the most delicious medicated coffee drink for those busy days!
Even though Memorial Day has passed in the States, the barbecues aren’t quite over yet! The 4th of July has yet to happen and there are plenty of weekends left with beautiful weather! Looking to spice up your usually normal barbecue with some cannabis fun? This recipe will teach you how to infuse your BBQ sauce with cannabis, not only giving you a great sauce but also an awesome way to medicate this summer.
Healthy eating is important in the life of a stoner! Stir fry has always been a favorite of mine and now you can make it medicated! It’s a far cry from the food we made in Home Ec in middle school but it tastes even better, now that we’re old enough not to burn the veggies to the pan. You can add in veggies or meats if you feel like it and of course, more bud if you feel inclined. Just always remember that eating cannabis is much different than smoking cannabis and you should always know your tolerance before eating too much!
There’s so many stoners that love to wake and bake. The only thing that can be added to an awesome morning smoke session to make it better is coffee. Stoners love their coffee. What happens if you’re rushing though and you have to make a choice? Not anymore. Following this short recipe will provide you with the most delicious medicated coffee drink for those busy days!
Weed connoisseur Pilcher (Spliffs 3: The Last Word on Cannabis Culture) deals a gnarly collection of 35 starters, entrees, desserts and drinks, all using the kind of pot not generally found in the kitchen cabinet. Nor is this the type of cookbook that provides a list of suppliers for hard-to-find ingredients. But for the reader with a ready stash, these offerings are served up in a well-researched and easy to digest manner, with plenty of tempting color photos and helpful data such as the suggested amount of cannabis bud per person per meal, based on body weight. The key to being a successful ganja gourmet, it turns out, is to first prepare a smooth batch of either Cannabis Ghee or Cannabis Butter. This allows for easier measurement but more importantly ensures that the psychoactive chemical du jour, tetrahydrocannabinol, blends evenly into the dish. Thus three tablespoons of Cannabutter transform perfectly legal mushrooms into Really Wild Mushroom Sauté and the hopped-up ghee is at the heart of an in-your-face Charas Curry, where it mingles with red chilies, ginger and cilantro. There's a classic brownie recipe, of course, sweetened with honey. (Oct.)
Set aside two tablespoons of hemp seeds in a small owl. Take the remaining hemp seeds, cacao powder, salt, and walnuts it to a small food processor and pulse for 10 seconds until the mixture is finely ground. Take half of the dates and the vanilla extract and add them in. Puree everything for about 15 seconds and then move it to a mixing bowl. Form 15 to 18 small meatball sized balls and roll them in the remaining hemp seeds to give the a nice covering. Set the balls in a container and let them sit in the fridge for about two hours. You can enjoy them then or wait and store them in the fridge like stated above! Enjoy!
What better stoner treat to make in the summer for when the heat really hits? Popsicles are always a hit, it doesn’t matter what age you and your friends are or what time of year it is for that matter. If you whip these babies out at a backyard gathering in the summer, you’re sure to be a huge hit. Plus, since they’re medicated, people will be able to enjoy your party that much more. And if you don’t feel like sharing, you don’t have to and you can eat this tray of six popsicles all to yourself.
Hi Jimmy, I first want to tell you that you are doing nothing wrong. If what you are doing works for you then that’s great. After telling me where you live and how you make your medicine proves to me that all the gadgets and gizmos out there to “properly” infuse your edibles are really unnecessary. The short answer to your question is, yes you can gain a bit of THC by decarboxylating your cannabis first. However, because you bake your cookies, there is some decarbing going on during that process too. But decarbing, before you cook with it, won’t hurt. My method is to place the cannabis in an oven safe baking dish, cover and put in the oven for 20 minutes at 240 degrees. That’s it. To answer your 2nd question, Yes, using your niece’s oven where you have control over your temps will help ensure proper decarboxylation and cooking of your “beetles.”
"Written by a ten-year veteran of the iconic magazine, Elise McDonough, the cookbook is humorous yet educational and compassionate yet still strongly counter-culture, as befitting the magazine's 40-year legacy. For those people who require medibles in their own lives or make them as part of underground compassionate care groups...the book is a highly useful tool." -Houston Press
Set up a double boiler (take a large mason jar and a large saucepan and fill the pan about half way with water). Take your coconut oil and chips and add them to the mason jar, letting the chips slowly melt. It’s important to do this slowly so that you won’t lose any THC from the oil or butter that you’re using. Once the chips are melted, add in your Karo syrup. Be sure that everything is mixed (once the chips have melted fully, you can move the mixture to a bowl but you have to be quick because the liquid solidifies quickly once the heat source is removed) and then pour the mixture in to a saran-wrap lined 8×8 pan. Be sure that the saran-wrap covers the sides of the pan that you’re using so that the candy doesn’t stick. The wrap should overhang far enough that you can now wrap the top of the saran-wrap over the candy, fully covering it. Let the candy sit out overnight.
As to “mud” I would have had to see it to be sure what the cause is. Was there dirt or roots in the mix? Actual dirt should be gently washed off – gently you don’t want to remove trichomes. If not, it sounds like maybe the plant material was too finely ground. I know a lot cooks recommend grinding the plants finely (and the Magic Butter Machine does it automatically). But I have found it is better to just rough grind as if you were rolling a joint, or even just crumble the plant material with your fingers. What you are trying to extract is ON the plant, not within it, and I find that over grinding just adds extra plant material and green taste to the final product.
Once your wings have been chilling in the fridge and you’re ready to bake them preheat your oven to *425 degrees. Lightly grease a cookie sheet with olive oil or cooking spray and set aside.  Melt a ½ cup of cannabis butter on low heat. Once your cannabis butter is melted turn heat off and whisk in ½ cup of hot sauce. Separate your hot sauce and cannabis butter mixture equally into 2 separate small bowls and set aside.
Substitute your marijuana infused butter for regular butter.[9] Unlike with oils, most recipes use small amounts of butter for flavor. You can substitute the entire recipe amount with marijuana butter. If you find that you are not getting the needed medicinal effect, consider increasing the amount of marijuana per stick of butter to a half an ounce. Alternately, you can use a different method of cooking with marijuana.
Wolf learned about food at friends’ homes and on vacations, which featured pit stops for roadside delicacies like fried apple pies. After college, at N.Y.U., she ran a catering business, then studied at the Culinary Institute of America, where her nickname was Noodles. She worked in several Manhattan restaurants, including the River Café and a small Upper East Side place called the Wine Bistro. In 1980, she met Bruce, who turned her on to food styling, the art of preparing food for photo shoots. She started doing freelance magazine work, writing recipes for Self, New York, and Mademoiselle, then moved to the parenting magazine Child, where, for nineteen years, she wrote a monthly column on family-friendly recipes.
We recommend slightly amending your decarb time based on the moisture levels in the starting material; very dry material will need less time and fresher material will need significantly more time (it needs to dry and then decarb). In our experience, it is better to overdo the decarb than to come up short and not fully activate your cannabinoids. For reference, if you continue to decarb once all of the THCa has converted to THC, it will begin to convert to CBN, the strongest sedative of the known cannabinoids. Accordingly, if you desire sleep-inducing edibles, you should leave the tray of material in the oven longer than is suggested on this chart. The length of additional time will impact the ratio of THC to CBN in the edibles.
A friend lab tested a batch of brownies that had plain kief stirred into the batter as opposed to kief that had been first decarboxylated.  He found the latter to be about 30% more potent.  It’s easy to do, just put your kief or hash in an oven proof dish and heat for about 20 minutes at 250 degrees F.  Remove from oven, cool and you are ready to use for cooking.
As we discussed earlier, kief and hash can range from dry and crumbly to sticky and gummy.  Many smokers prefer the latter, but for cooking purposes, the dry, crumbly, powdery stuff is often easiest to work with because it is easy to grind which then allows you to stir the fine powder into all kinds of foods, something impossible to do with the gummy type of hash.  If you plan on dissolving the hash in a hot liquid, however, either type will work fine. Learn more about dealing with the various consistencies of hash and kief at this link.
Obligatory Bob Loblaw Disclaimer: While cannabis is legal for recreational use in Colorado and Washington, as well as for medical use in 20 states and D.C., it is still technically illegal under federal law. Do this at your own risk. Also remember that edibles require longer to take effect (anywhere from 30 minutes to 3 hours) but hit way harder than smoking, along with longer lasting effects (anywhere from 2 to 8 hours depending on the strength of the butter and the number of brownies you just inhaled). Do not attempt to drive, operate heavy machinery, perform surgery, perform long division, or generally move further from your couch than absolutely necessary.
Similarly to preparing other recipes, it is rather important that you pay close attention to the measurements and weights that medical marijuana recipes require. If you are a beginner at preparing weed recipes, be sure to use no more than one ounce of premium quality marijuana per recipe. As you practice making these recipes and have discovered what potency of weed works best for you, you can up the amounts you use to cook.
The predominant compounds found in cannabis are THCA and CBDA. THCA is the major cannabinoid in Cannabis, while CBDA predominates in fiber-type hemps. THCA and CBDA accumulate in the secretory cavity of the glandular trichomes, which largely occur in female flowers and in most aerial parts of the plants. The concentration of these compounds depends on the variety of cannabis and its growth, harvesting and storage conditions. When locked in their acidic forms, THCA and CBDA are not bioavailable to the body’s cannabinoid receptors. Occurring either naturally within the plant, or upon “decarboxylation” (heating the plant material), these acids are non-enzymatically decarboxylated into their corresponding neutral forms (THC and CBD).
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