Oh, but I do. I’ve been making it for about 40 years. It just has to be hot enough to cause carboxylation (178+F), and it’s crucial not to burn the butter. You can do it with water and butter, but still, that only takes about 75 minutes tops. I’m doing it in straight butter because like cooks who make Hollandaise sauce on the heat, it’s because I’m good at it. What a vape has to do with any of this is beyond me. Keep vaping, and you’ll have COPD, chronic bronchitis, and any number of lung issues, because contrary to your hipster beliefs system that is completely wrong, vaping is bad for you. When you’ve done this as long as I have, then get back to me.
Other components of the cannabis plant are in the hash oil as well. Traces of psychoactive THC and other cannabinoids are included to ensure the “entourage effect”. The entourage effect is the term given to the process of all available cannabinoids working together within the body to allow the desired effect to manifest. Thus, you should use High CBD Hash Oil with caution, be prepared for varied results, and take notes on how effective the ratio of CBD:THC is for your symptoms.
I strained my mix once and it worked fine. I then carefully funneled the strained tincture in to the dropper bottles. With this recipe, the mix should fill 11 bottles. I also hung on to the mason jar and stuck it in the fridge to scrape later. Throw away the stuff that’s left in the cheesecloth. That’s trash. But now, you should have a bunch of bottles full of delicious tincture. To ingest the medicine, put a dropper full under your tongue and swish it around your cheeks for about ten seconds. Some people require more than one dropper full. Take what you need and enjoy!
 In a bowl, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and oatmeal, mix well. Grab another bowl and beat eggs, salt, and vanilla. In another large bowl add the canna-butter, oil, and both sugars. Add in the egg mix until creamy and smooth. Then pour in the flour mix and stir everything in together. Now add in the raisins and mix once more.
This product may be applied to an “oil rig” for the highest intensity medication possible. An oil rig is a device used much like a traditional water pipe, or bong, which uses a heated element, usually titanium or quartz, to heat up the High CBD Hash Oil to a critical temperature. The oil is vaporized, channeled through water filtration for cooling, and inhaled by the user in a large concentration. This produces a less-bodied smoke that is not as thick as cannabis-plant smoke but equally expansive in the lungs and cough inducing.
Andrea Drummer is a Los Angeles-based culinary school grad and private chef specializing in cannabis cooking. Maybe because of her culinary training, the book is short on the science of cooking with cannabis and long on recipes, including some fun ones such as kimchi fried rice and escargot in puff pastry. This is both good and bad, as the recipes for infused stock, pasta dough and mayonnaise are comforting for home cooks, but the book doesn’t give much information about how to work with or use cannabis. (There’s also no index, which is frustrating.) Although Drummer gives bud pairings, as if she’s talking about a good Cabernet, decarboxylation isn’t even mentioned; recipes simply call for grams of “cannabis product.” This assumes a lot, and unless you’re already versed in this kind of cooking, you’ll need outside reference in order to use this one properly.
Put the water, marijuana, and butter into a large pot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and let simmer up to five hours. Turn heat off and run the mixture through a fine metal strainer or cheesecloth into a bowl. Squeeze cheesecloth to remove whatever butter you can from the marijuana. Discard the weed when you’re done. Put the bowl of hot water and butter in the fridge or freezer. When the butter hardens, dump out the water, microwave the butter a bit, and then transfer to a Tupperware container. The butter will keep for several weeks.

This 3-year-old cookbook from two classically trained chefs — the pair have degrees from the Culinary Institute of America, Le Cordon Bleu and Johnson and Wales between them — is one of the better books about cannabis cooking. It’s both pragmatic and culinary-minded, and avoids the stoner language that can obfuscate the prose of the genre. The concise “cannabis 101” intro section concludes with good recipes for canna-oil, canna-butter and compound butters made with it — a great and nicely cheffy touch. The recipes focus on well-sourced ingredients and give techniques for components in such a way that you could easily use the book for non-pot cooking. I’d switch out the cannabutter for regular butter and make the triple-chocolate espresso cookies on a regular rotation, and the matcha sugar cookies too.
Funny is relative. Funny rotten, throw it out. Funny like weed strain and use. Did you use water, if so this would increase chances of something growing that you don’t want in there. If it is just oil and cannabis and the cannabis in submerged, you might be OK. If you stored it in the fridge, you should be fine either way. I could not tell for sure unless I saw and smelled it. But when in doubt, my motto is always to toss it out. Sorry.
“If you’re stoned, it’s highly entertaining,” says cannabis chocolatier and co-host Vanessa Lavorato. The summer before Bong Appétit started filming, Lavorato says she slowly built up her tolerance to edibles, so she could better handle herself while stoned on air. In the end, all her hard work didn’t matter much. “You can’t hide it. You’re just really high on camera, which hopefully is funny for people.”
She decided that she could do better. At home, she came up with a recipe for infused almond bars, using the powerful taste of the almond extract to mask the taste of marijuana. “They had the texture of a thick sugar cookie,” she told me. “Crisp on the outside but chewy on the inside, with sliced almonds on top.” They contained a hundred and forty-five milligrams of THC. She sold them to local dispensaries, where they were a hit. The only complaint: even the heavy users were getting too stoned. You were supposed to eat only a fraction of the bar. “People would say, ‘They’re too delicious. I couldn’t stop eating it!’ ” Wolf said.
Wolf gave me a preview of the meal: marijuana-free chicken Marbella and couscous, paired with infused sides and appetizers. The dishes had been set out on a sideboard. Next to each one was a card with the potency level noted in calligraphy: “Stuffed Mushrooms, 5 mg THC each.” (Five milligrams of tetrahydrocannabinol is about the equivalent of a few puffs from a joint.) The secret to cooking with cannabis is fat. THC, the main psychoactive ingredient, bonds to fat molecules when heated. There are high-tech ways of doing this, but Wolf prefers to do it “the old-fashioned way, with good butter and good oil.” Her cookbooks always begin with recipes for what she calls canna-butter and canna-oil.
Many people know to decarboxylate cannabis in the oven first, but it’s worth noting here for anyone who doesn’t know or doesn’t see the point in doing so. You can skip this step and add your raw cannabis to the slow cooker to decarb in the oil, but you might find that this longer oil soak simply worsens the taste of your cannabis oil. It’s also more difficult to control the temperature in a slow cooker and you risk burning off essential cannabinoids, but in an oven, you can set the temperature low and keep it steady.
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