BUT…that said, you must be EXTREMELY cautious when it comes to THC and pets, especially dogs as dogs have more cannabinoid receptors in their brains than any other species! Likewise, it is very easy for them to get too much. In most cases they will sleep it off and be fine but it is scary for the owner to watch and uncomfortable for the pet if they get too much. Overdose is characterized by a condition known as Static Ataxia, which is characterized by a wide-legged stance, drooling, disorientation, and the animal being hypersensitive to touch (if you pet dog who has had too much, it will react almost like an electrical shock). They are likely to have quick shallow breathing too. It can take hours to wear off and it is scary to watch.
Wolf is sometimes called the Martha Stewart of edibles. The designation owes something to superficial similarities. At sixty-two, Wolf resembles a crunchier version of the domestic icon: she has an ample figure, graying hair, and glasses, and she wears loose linen outfits, generally paired with Crocs. But the designation also refers to her role as an educator, schooling people on how best to cook with marijuana. She is the author or co-author of several cookbooks, including “Herb,” which seeks to “elevate the art and science of cooking with cannabis” and “The Medical Marijuana Dispensary,” which features soothing dishes, like stuffed sweet potato, that will get you stoned. Her recipes appear in all the major cannabis publications: High Times, Dope, and Culture, as well as the Cannabist, a Denver Post Web site devoted to the booming legal-marijuana industry. There you can watch her instructional videos on making infused delicacies like the creamy chicken-based Mama Leone’s soup. (“This soup is worth its weight in weed.”)
So yeah, testing this hash butter made me melt into the floor and feel like I just wasn’t going to make it to see another day. Let my mistake stand as a reminder that you really need to be conscious of dosing your edibles. Even an experienced edibles writer sometimes gets hungry and eats half of a grilled cheese without calculating dosage first and spends half of her afternoon asking the farmer to remind her that she’s not, in fact, dying.
Take a small pot and add in your cannabis and Everclear. Keep the heat on medium low, at a simmer but never at a boil. This heat will burn off a lot of the alcohol, hopefully allowing you to drink this lemonade without getting hammered. The alcohol is in the recipe in order to extract the THC from the cannabis. After you have brought the cannabis and alcohol up to the right temp, add in half of the glass of water. The mixture should cook until about half of it is evaporated. Then, strain the mixture through cheese cloth to remove any leftover cannabis sediment. Be sure to squeeze the cheesecloth out to make sure that you get all of the trapped liquid. Then, you can add in the rest of the water, freshly squeezed lemon juice, and sugar as you see fit. Store this drink in the fridge! Enjoy!
Alice B. Toklas, who presided over literary salons in early twentieth-century Paris with partner Gertrude Stein, firmly ensconced the practice of cooking and eating cannabis in the cultural imagination with The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book. First published in 1954, it offered up a recipe for Hashish Fudge, which “anyone could whip up on a rainy day.” In addition to pulverizing a “bunch of cannabis sativa,” the recipe calls for black peppercorns, dried figs, and peanuts. In an introduction to the 1984 reprint of the book, food writer M.F.K. Fisher wrote that she had never tried one of the fudge brownies, but “am told they taste slightly bitter.” These days, no cannabis chef worth their herb would recommend throwing raw product into baked goods, but brownies can be an ideal vehicle for THC. It just takes a few more steps than Toklas imagined.
At the end of the day, however, a great marijuana cook has to have a great pot brownie. “Once Mary came into the business, we tested about eight different brownie recipes,” Wolf said. They tried one from the back of a brownie-mix box and one that Wolf had learned at the Culinary Institute of America. Nigella Lawson’s brownie was delicious, but too mild to counter the weedy taste of canna-butter. Finally, they settled on an adaptation of a “fudgy” brownie developed by a magazine-editor friend of Wolf’s, Freddi Greenberg. Wolf’s version includes extra vanilla and cocoa as “flavor disguisers.” She uses a short baking time, to create a gooey interior. Last year, the cannabis Web site Leafly held a pot-brownie contest to coincide with college basketball’s March Madness tournament. Recipes from Martha Stewart, Mario Batali, and Julia Child faced off against pot-oriented recipes from publications like Edibles List and High Times. Wolf’s brownie won. The Cannabist called it “among the most heavenly creations known to ganja-loving humanity.” Wolf said, “It’s pretty fucking delicious, I have to say.”

Pros: It is impossible for our bodies to feel high off of skin contact with cannabis infused oil so any psychoactivity associated with THC will not be felt by the user. However, every bit of the medicine is available to the body. Human skin absorbs up to 90% of what it comes in contact with (hence reapplication of sunscreen) so the medicine is immediately available and fast acting.


Hello from England. Thanks for your article. I’m completely new to this, and found this very helpful. I’ve been given some solid hash but as I don’t smoke, eating is obviously the way forward. To avoid any smell in my house (we have teenage children) could i bake it in a sealed oven bag? If yes, would this affect times and temps? Thanks for your help.
Take all of your fresh ingredients and place them in to a medium sized mixing bowl. Mix everything together for about ten minutes, making sure that everything is well blended. It should have the consistency of normal dressing, creamy and smooth. However, if you like your dressing to be slightly more or less creamy, you can adjust the recipe as you see fit. Don’t forget to add in the salt and pepper also. Once the dressing tastes right, place the bowl in the fridge for at least two hours before you serve it. Enjoy your medicated dressing!
When cannabis is legalized on Oct. 17, Canadians still won’t be able to buy weed brownies in the store. Edible pot products aren’t part of the initial roll-out out, and there’s no word yet on when they will be available. You can, however, buy your own cannabis and turn it into special brownies, cookies and pretty much anything else you can dream up. Here’s how to do it.
We recommend slightly amending your decarb time based on the moisture levels in the starting material; very dry material will need less time and fresher material will need significantly more time (it needs to dry and then decarb). In our experience, it is better to overdo the decarb than to come up short and not fully activate your cannabinoids. For reference, if you continue to decarb once all of the THCa has converted to THC, it will begin to convert to CBN, the strongest sedative of the known cannabinoids. Accordingly, if you desire sleep-inducing edibles, you should leave the tray of material in the oven longer than is suggested on this chart. The length of additional time will impact the ratio of THC to CBN in the edibles.
So to take the taste out, you basically have to extract as much of that stuff as possible by soaking the bud for a couple of days in distilled water, and then after that, blanching it. By blanching, you're basically getting a much purer flower to start with and later to infuse into your butter or oil. It's still going to smell like cannabis, but if you cook with it, you won't taste anything. Most canna-butters are usually green or even black. Mine is yellow.

Performing the infusion at 150degF helps get the THCa, CBDa, and the rest of the cannabinoids into the oil. But that temp is too low to break up the THCa into THC and CO2. So I am able to do the decarb during baking. I find a brownie mix that needs 1/2 cup oil (which works for the proportions of ingredients that I use) and bake the brownies at 240degF for 1 hour 10 minues. (The extra 10 minutes just seems to help bake the brownies…but isn’t long enough to affect the decarbing “thermal history”).
In most instances, oil will rise to the top of the water but won’t solidify.  No problem.  You can use a spoon to skim the oil off the water.  Even better is a kitchen gadget called a gravy separator that looks like a small pitcher with the spout originating on the bottom.  This unique design allows the water to be poured out while retaining every drop of the oil floating at the top.  During the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, gravy separators are sold everywhere, otherwise find them at gourmet shops.  You can also find extra large gravy separators year round at restaurant supply stores.

Part of weed culture since the 1960s, weed butter can be made in a variety of ways. The process begins with some version of decarboxylation—or activating the THC. (Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is the psychoactive chemical compound of cannabis—what gets you stoned and what separates marijuana from hemp.) Decarboxylation can be done a multitude of ways, but typically involves cooking the weed at a low temperature for a prolonged period of time in butter or oil. Keep in mind, however, like any other dish you’re making, too much time in the oven or too much heat will torch the ingredients—rendering the THC ineffective.
Sayegh is at the forefront of a growing movement to reimagine cannabis in the kitchen, and he’s become known for his many-coursed gourmet THC-infused dinners in a style he describes as “French with Italian and Middle Eastern influence.” But tonight his gingerbread construction—which he’s created for a party benefitting the victims of a warehouse fire in Northern California—is just for show. Sayegh hasn’t lab-tested the village, so he doesn’t know how potent it might be, and he won’t serve imprecisely dosed food. Once upon a time, the menu included cannabis-infused appetizers to appease guests salivating over the off-limits village, but it turns out cocktails are on offer at this party, and mixing cannabis edibles with liquor can make for a “dizzy” experience, he says; he doesn’t serve them together. Guests still partake of his hors d’oeuvres, but they’re made solely from non-mind-expanding ingredients. Navigating such things are all part of the job; complications traditional chefs have never pondered.
So yeah, testing this hash butter made me melt into the floor and feel like I just wasn’t going to make it to see another day. Let my mistake stand as a reminder that you really need to be conscious of dosing your edibles. Even an experienced edibles writer sometimes gets hungry and eats half of a grilled cheese without calculating dosage first and spends half of her afternoon asking the farmer to remind her that she’s not, in fact, dying.
The new book The 420 Gourmet: The Elevated Art of Cannabis Cuisine (out June 28 through Harper Collins) bills itself as a cookbook, but it's also an educational guide to cooking responsibly and efficiently with marijuana. Author JeffThe420Chef—a.k.a. the "Julia Child of weed"—is credited with inventing "light tasting" and "tasteless" canna-butter and canna-oil, as well as the immensely helpful online THC/CBD calculator, and he begins the book with an overview of the various methods that are key to perfecting marijuana-enhanced cuisine. Drawing on his experience cooking for medical marijuana patients and hosting classes for recreational patrons, Jeff explains how to tailor your recipes and dosing for the experience you want, whether it's soothing, non-psychoactive pain relief or flat-on-your-back stupor.
“There are two different compounds in cannabis. One is THC, that’s the psychoactive cannabinoid that gets you high,” Jeff says. “But the lesser-known ‘little brother’ of THC is CBD, and that is a non-psychoactive medicinal compound in cannabis. And that’s what people use to treat seizures, and scientific studies are starting to show that it kills cancer cells and shrinks tumors.”
Because marijuana in food takes longer to metabolize, it will take longer for it to affect you. Expect to feel the effects in about 30 minutes to an hour.[16] Expect the effects to last longer as well compared to smoking. You will not get the same effects due to the differences in how the body absorbs the cannabinoids. Be careful not to overdose by overeating when the effects are not as strong as desired.
For an additional boost in bioavailability, we suggest adding 1+ teaspoon of soy lecithin to the crockpot with the starting material and coconut oil. Soy lecithin is a naturally occurring compound found in all cells in nature, plants and animals. The inclusion of lecithin homogenizes the oil and boosts your body’s ability to absorb the cannabinoids; resulting in more intense effects from the same starting material.
Cannabis Now contributor Jessica Catalano is another strain-specific chef — in fact, she’s the world’s first. She first started posting recipes on her Ganja Kitchen Revolution blog in 2010, choosing strains based on the complementary flavors they add to non-medicated ingredients. The website inspired a book of the same name, where Catalano recommends adding Blue Cheese to biscuits, Pineapple Kush to a piña colada, and Sour Diesel to a Lebanese tabouli. If you can’t afford the book, Catalano still posts plenty of free recipes to her blog.

Creating cannabutter or cannaoil at home is a simple process no matter which oil you choose. The trickiest part can be getting the ratio of oil to bud just right. A common canna oil ratio is 1 cup of oil to 1 ounce of ground marijuana. For cannabutter, your ratio would be 1 pound of butter to 1 ounce of weed. Although widely used for many years, the need for so much cannabis in your recipe is primarily due to the high cannabinoid loss that comes with attempting to decarboxylate (or activate) during infusion. An ounce of flower testing at 18% THCa decarbed in your Ardent Decarboxylator will yield approximately 5,040mg of THC!

One major difference between marijuana butter and cannabis oil is their accessibility. In states where marijuana is legal, cannabis oil can be readily found at nearly any dispensary. In one-gram packages, cannabis oil comes in a plethora of consistencies, including shatter, wax, crumble, cake batter, sauce, diamonds, and more. While dispensaries in legal states aren’t hard to find, marijuana butter can be. While many shops carry a mass-produced industrial edible marijuana oil or butter product, other shops only carry smokable cannabis oil and traditional bud. It can be a niche product, and I’d suggest calling ahead to check availability. As someone with the privilege to access legal weed, I’ve still found the most consistent way to have marijuana butter is to make it myself. For those in less marijuana-friendly states, cannabis oil can be impossible to find and using the traditional method of making a personal batch of weed butter is their best bet for experiencing edibles this 4/20.
In addition to infusing butter and oil with bud, you can infuse it with kief for a very potent infusion. If you’re not familiar with kief, it’s the sticky bits of resin you see on buds. It has a high concentration of cannabinoids but when cooked, it doesn’t impart the cannabis flavor like using the whole flower. In addition, kief butter needs an even quicker infusion and you don’t need to strain plant matter out of your finished product. Again, because of the high concentration of cannabinoids in kief, this makes a very potent oil so start small with your dosage.

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Amy Scattergood is a staff writer for the Food section of the Los Angeles Times. She has degrees from Yale Divinity School, the Iowa Writers Workshop and the Cordon Bleu and has written a book of poetry and co-written a whole grain cookbook. Although originally from Iowa, she’s lived in L.A. for a long time now and will continue to do so, as long as tacos and the Pacific Ocean exist.
Start off by grinding up the rosin chips in the coffee grinder until they are a fine powder in the coffee grinder. Set them aside and take a measuring cup and scoop the coconut oil in to it. Put the measuring cup with the coconut oil in the microwave and heat it slowly until the oil is a liquid. Measure out your required amount (I believe you will need 1 1/3 cups total for the two boxes) and pour it in to a pot. Add in the rosin chips and let the mixture simmer for about half an hour to forty five minutes, stirring occasionally. Make sure to keep the heat low. If the mixture is bubbling a lot, it’s too hot. After the time is up on the canna-coconut oil, you need to strain the mixture through cheesecloth to extract the plant matter. Over a bowl, strain the oil in the cheesecloth (be sure that you squeeze the cloth to make sure that you get all of the oil) and mix up the brownie batter following the instructions on the box. Finish cooking them according to the brownie instructions. Once they are done cooking in the oven, you will have some extremely potent and incredibly delicious coconut-canna-brownies made with recycled rosin chips! Enjoy!
Take the muffin pan (spray it with some Pam first so your treats don’t get stuck) and put a cookie’s worth amount of cookie dough at the bottom of each one. Kind of smush them flat so that they cover the bottom. Take a single Reese’s and place it on top of each of the cookies. Finally, pour the brownie mix in to each muffin so that it fills the little cup about halfway or until you’ve used all of the brownie mix. Either one works. The end result can either be a huge treat or a small one, depending on the amount of brownie that you use.
Andrea Drummer, Le Cordon Bleu graduate and owner of L.A.’s Elevation VIP, offers home cooks a chance to step up their cooking game by treating cannabis infusions like the culinary art that it truly is. In her cookbook, she explains the nuances of flavor profiles in specific strains and ways to pair them with food. For readers interested in elevating their dishes and bringing a touch of fine dining into kitchen, this cookbook will not only deepen your appreciation for an excellent dish, but also challenge you to improve your skills and techniques.
I have made cannabis-infused butter many times with inconsistent results. I always start with a ration of 454g of unsalted butter and 28 grams of cannabis. I boil 6 cups of water or so then add the butter and the ground cannabis (i grind it by hand using a manual grinder) and reduce heat, letting it simmer for 3-5 hours. Strain through a cheese cloth and let cool over night.
This is my first batch. I used 1oz manicured ground cured bud in 1lb of butter. I put both in a slow cooker plus a cup of water. I set the cooker to the lowest temp for the longest time. Next day, I poured the butter & bud (water evaporated) through a tea strainer into a pyrex measuring cup. I had no cheesecloth and I suspect I’ll want to strain the cannabutter again before I put it in (Cook’s Illustrated Classic) Brownies. We will make the brownies next week. Wish us well.
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