Preheat your oven to 370 degrees. Put your canna butter in a large mixing bowl and mix in your vanilla extract and sugar. Use another bowl and mix your flour, salt, and baking soda. Stir in your eggs, brown sugar, chips, and all other ingredients, mixing in just enough water to make a hard semi-solid. Now stir in your canna butter and size your cookies by how much weed you used. If you used a half ounce, make at least 14 cookies. Each cookie will be equal to one large bowl of smoked marijuana. Remember effects take at least an hour, so don’t eat too many cookies but enjoy just one cookie or a half and you will get amazing results.
Melt the cannabis butter in a small saucepan over low heat and blend in remaining ingredients. Stuff the turkey and/or season it with salt and pepper, if desired. Make a small incision in the skin of the turkey. Force a finger through the slit and break the contact between the skin and the meat. Using a meat injector, squirt half the butter mixture under the skin. Cook the turkey according to your favorite method, basting it with the remaining butter mixture every half hour until it’s done. We cooked it on a Traeger grill and it was juicier and more moist than any turkey I have ever had before.
And if President Trump has taught us anything, it’s that not everything that looks appealing on reality TV works well in real life. Full-scale cannabis restaurants do not yet exist, even in states that have legalized. The techniques involved in making pot-infused crème fraîche are rather complicated for a home chef, especially one who likes to get baked before baking. And of course, achieving the correct dosage for each person at a marijuana dinner party is nearly impossible — one diner might literally require ten to twenty times as much THC as another. Perhaps that’s why it’s more entertaining to watch the making of a full weed meal than to consume one. “If I wasn’t on the show, it’s not how I would choose to be high,” says Lavorato. “I would just smoke.”
All cannabis oil packaging must also state the percentage of THC and CBD in the oil (so you know how potent and psychotropic it is before you use it). Just like strains of dried cannabis, oils can have stronger concentrations of CBD, THC, or be more balanced, and thus create very different experiences. Not all oils are created equal – so reading the packaging is crucial for your first time. 

Step 8: Take a ladle or coffee mug and scoop out some of the green mixture onto the cloth. Keep pouring until you get close (about 6″) to the top of the container. Then take the cheesecloth off and squeeze into the container as hard as you can to get the most butter out of the mix. Repeat into all containers until all of your green stew is out of the stock pot and squeezed into the containers. *Note: most of the butter is saturated into the leaves and that’s the part you want to ensure gets totally squeezed out of the mixture and into your containers.
Many people know to decarboxylate cannabis in the oven first, but it’s worth noting here for anyone who doesn’t know or doesn’t see the point in doing so. You can skip this step and add your raw cannabis to the slow cooker to decarb in the oil, but you might find that this longer oil soak simply worsens the taste of your cannabis oil. It’s also more difficult to control the temperature in a slow cooker and you risk burning off essential cannabinoids, but in an oven, you can set the temperature low and keep it steady.
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