Summer is almost upon us. What’s a better snack in the warmer times of the year then fresh vegetables dipped in ranch dressing? Of course, veggies aren’t as awesome as junk food but since most stoners these days are pretty health conscious, I figure that a few of you could definitely use this recipe yourselves! The dressing can also be used on salads, sandwiches, or any other cool summer snack. It only takes a few hours to make so even the most stoned stoner can prepare and enjoy this medicated ranch dressing.
Moriarty’s book visually demonstrates the “secret” process for creating her magical 10x Cannabutter, which replaces the bitter “grass flavor” with a tasty, nutty butter flavor. The smokin’ hot cook book includes 49 easy-to-prepare, delicious dishes that range from her signature dessert, “Blue Sky Lemon Bars”, to her “Dizzy Bird Turkey with Stuffing” – a perfect dish for festive holiday dinners.
 In a small bowl mix together the canna-oil, honey, balsamic venegar, and 1/2 of the lemon juice. Once the vegetables are done cooking, remove from the oven and let cool for 3-5 minutes then pour the beautiful canna-oil mix on top and add the grated parmesean. Serve yourself up a heaping portion and see just how happy these veggies make you feel… And thats how to make roasted vegetables with marijuana, enjoy!
Seattle chef Ricky Flickenger got his start at a popular cupcake shop and now teaches home cooking classes—which included one on the science of cooking with cannabis, until shifting laws made him retire that particular session. A self-taught chef, Flickenger is used to figuring things out on his own and, like many cooks in the cannabis field, keeps up to date on scientific research. He’s partial to making his butters and oils with a product called kief, a powdery substance made from the glittery, hairlike trichomes that protrude from the cannabis plant. Kief is one of the many cannabis extracts that have found their way into dispensaries alongside traditional buds.

Pour 12 doses of cannabis oil into a measuring cup at least 1 cup in size. Once the cannabis oil has been added, top it up with the melted coconut oil until you have a total of 3/4 cup of coconut oil and cannabis oil combined. Whisk the cannabis-coconut oil combination thoroughly to make sure that the cannabis has been evenly distributed into the coconut oil. This is a very important step to ensure that each muffin has equal doses of cannabis. Add the cannabis-coconut oil combination to the wet ingredients (large bowl) and whisk together ingredients, making sure to evenly mix the cannabis-coconut oil into the wet ingredients.
When choosing a strain to use in your bake, consider the effects each strain offers. Indicas usually offer profound relaxation while sativas are more stimulating. If you want to treat anxiety and pain, you might want an indica. If instead you want to address fatigue, a sativa might be more appropriate. There are as many different strains of these basic categories as there are vendors and the different strains offer different experiences. One way to tell a potent strain is by smell. You want a potent and deep aroma from the strain you choose. You may have to test different strains for  thc edibles and ask other users and vendors what effects each give to find the strains that are right for you.
The definitive guide to making easy, everyday cannabis edibles for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert, my friend Cheri Sicard has done it again!  A lot of people ask for cannabis recipes and I always refer them to Cheri’s books.  Her latest, The Easy Cannabis Cookbook, is simple, fun and perfect for the novice marijuana enthusiast.  Check it out!

First things first: depending on the product you’ve purchased, you’ll be able to see THC-A and/or THC levels of your concentrate on the package label. Most concentrates aren’t decarboxylated (heat activated), and will have a very high THC-A and a low THC labeling . THC-A turns into THC when in contact with heat for a certain amount of time. THC-A loses approximately 13% of its mass when decarboxylated. After you’ve calculated how much of your THC-A corresponds to THC, you would additionally add the small THC amount in the label of your product. Please make sure to calculate your THC correctly. Below is a formula for calculating your total and final THC levels.
Super Baked Cannabis Buffalo Wings are on point for every stoner. A great addition for any party! The prep time is really only 15 minutes. Cannabis Buffalo Wings do have to be refrigerated for at least one hour so the flour coating gets firm before baking them. We like to prep them the night before and refrigerate them over night. If you like your wings really spicy you can always add more cayenne pepper to the dry mixture and/or use a spicier hot sauce. Enjoy!
All of this has produced a new category of cannabis user: people trying it for the first time, to see what the fuss is about, or coming back to it after a decades-long hiatus. Businesspeople see a future in which cannabis is part of a functional, even aspirational life style. Like Julia Child introducing Americans to French cuisine, Wolf serves as both a guide and an ambassador to this world. She was a chef and a food editor for many years, and she stands out as a source of reliable information in a nascent industry without dependable methods for cooking and dosing. Ricardo Baca, the founding editor of the Cannabist, told me, “Laurie represents a voice in the food-and-cannabis space that can be trusted.” Her columns are full of global ingredients and lush food photography meant to attract what she calls “the CB2 and West Elm crowd.” Her books would not seem out of place on the shelf next to the latest tome from the Barefoot Contessa or Yotam Ottolenghi. Evan Senn, the editor of the California-based cannabis magazine Culture, told me that, increasingly, foodies are the target audience for pot. “I love to drink wine, and I’m kind of a snob about it,” she said. “I’m not going to drink Franzia out of a cardboard box. I’m going to buy a nice bottle of Pinot Noir and aerate it and enjoy it. I have the same approach to edibles.”
You could eat a pound of raw cannabis and not get high. That’s because the main functional ingredient in a cannabis bud is in the form of a compound called tetrahydrocannabinolic acid, or THCA. THCA has no psychoactive effect. But delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, does. Applying heat to THCA kicks off a process called decarboxylation, which transforms it into THC.  When cannabis is smoked, THCA converts to THC along the way, and the process is largely taken for granted. Basically, every pot smoker, from a cancer patient to a teenage toker, embarks on an act of chemistry when they flick the lighter. But if you want to eat it instead of smoke it, things get more complicated. The most common way people decarboxylate, or “decarb,” cannabis for cooking is by toasting it on low heat (240 degrees Fahrenheit/116 degrees Celsius is a commonly recommended temperature) in an oven.
Support for legalized marijuana has increased exponentially over the last couple of decades. According to the Pew Research Center, 61 percent of Americans now support legalization, compared to just 31 percent in 2000. In the West, weed is a way of life: Recreational use is legal in Washington, Oregon, California, Colorado, Nevada and Alaska. And as legalization spreads to other states – it’s on the ballot in Michigan this November – many expect other entrepreneurs to lean on the example set by innovative Westerners. 
Seven pieces was not a good idea, says the former nonprofit worker, laughing. She’s come a long way since then, and says the ability to calculate dosage through lab testing is one of the biggest changes in the industry. Prior to laboratory testing, attempting to determine the potency of an edible required guesswork, which could lead to unpredictable results.
How to make Marinated Mushrooms with Marijuana! This is really exciting, and these mushrooms can be served with rice, fish, cut up in soups, or eaten alone and can add some much needed flare to your meal. Being that mushrooms are so diverse, there’s really no limit to what you can do with these and they also would make a great topping on pizza. You can think of these guys as a much more tasty, much more milder form of psychedelic mushrooms. Now that you’re more than eager to have a taste, let’s cook some!
Most people do not like the green herbal flavor of marijuana shining through their foods. Likewise recipes with lots of spices and flavors going on tend to mask this better than delicate and subtle fare. Use as much or a little more seasoning and flavor adding ingredients (such as onion and garlic) when cooking with cannabis than you would if you were cooking without marijuana.
Now pour your bread mixture evenly into your 2 greased loaf pans and bake in preheated oven at 350* for 55 minutes. A toothpick can be used to check if your bread is done. When toothpick comes out clean your bread is done. If it doesn’t it will need another 5-10 minutes depending on your oven. If your bread is done remove loaves and let cool on a wire rack. This bread does great for freezing and tastes just as fresh once defrosted.
While your methods are not the ones I use or teach, there are many methods and if what you are doing works for you, who am I to argue? For me, I do not infuse over direct heat (preferring to use a slow cooker or double boiler) as it is easy for things to get too hot and I have heard from many readers who ruined a good batch of weed. Of course, if you are careful it can be done.
“If you’re stoned, it’s highly entertaining,” says cannabis chocolatier and co-host Vanessa Lavorato. The summer before Bong Appétit started filming, Lavorato says she slowly built up her tolerance to edibles, so she could better handle herself while stoned on air. In the end, all her hard work didn’t matter much. “You can’t hide it. You’re just really high on camera, which hopefully is funny for people.”
You might be wondering why I include water as an ingredient.  Including water, especially when infusing marijuana oil on the stovetop, insures the cannabis will never reach a higher temperature than the boiling point or 212 degrees F.  More importantly, the chlorophyll and terpenes – the parts of the plant that give it its flavor and color — are water soluble and most will likewise bind to water during the cooking process instead of infusing themselves into the fats along with the THC.  This will mean less herbal flavor and green color in the finished marijuana oil.
All of this has produced a new category of cannabis user: people trying it for the first time, to see what the fuss is about, or coming back to it after a decades-long hiatus. Businesspeople see a future in which cannabis is part of a functional, even aspirational life style. Like Julia Child introducing Americans to French cuisine, Wolf serves as both a guide and an ambassador to this world. She was a chef and a food editor for many years, and she stands out as a source of reliable information in a nascent industry without dependable methods for cooking and dosing. Ricardo Baca, the founding editor of the Cannabist, told me, “Laurie represents a voice in the food-and-cannabis space that can be trusted.” Her columns are full of global ingredients and lush food photography meant to attract what she calls “the CB2 and West Elm crowd.” Her books would not seem out of place on the shelf next to the latest tome from the Barefoot Contessa or Yotam Ottolenghi. Evan Senn, the editor of the California-based cannabis magazine Culture, told me that, increasingly, foodies are the target audience for pot. “I love to drink wine, and I’m kind of a snob about it,” she said. “I’m not going to drink Franzia out of a cardboard box. I’m going to buy a nice bottle of Pinot Noir and aerate it and enjoy it. I have the same approach to edibles.”
When straining cannabis oil after infusing it, go slow and be careful. Cheesecloth is the best strainer to use. It only allows the oil through. However, while many people will then squeeze the remaining oil out of the leaves, be careful. If you squeeze too hard, you will get extra plant material. Instead, be gentle and let gravity do the work for you.
Hugh! I am so glad to have found you! I have been smoking herb for 37 yrs but am asthmatic and recently my lungs got so bad I HAD to give it up! After my lungs improved I researched how to make oil with herb but some of the instructions make no sense to me – wash the herb, dry it (or put it in a dehydrator?), wash it again, then roast it: all before cooking it with oil, in a special contraption, for 18hrs??? I consider myself a quick study & good cook so I combined a bunch of methods, took advice from some of the comments, simplified it & tried the following: I cleaned it (I buy it on the stalk with seeds in, leaves removed); chopped it in a coffee grinder – just like I would before rolling, fine but not powdery – roasted it on a cookie sheet in my oven at 250 for 1hr; put it in a glass bowl with coconut oil at a 1:2 herb to oil ratio; returned it to the oven & continued heating it at 250 for 2hrs. After it cooled I strained it using cheese cloth & used some in baking, some on crackers, some mixed with peanut butter. I found it best in the baking. I am currently living in the Caribbean and – after years of searching – finally found a grower/seller who provides me with very good quality herb at a great price (VERY hard for a non local to get). Pure coconut oil (commercial, not organic) is a helluva lot cheaper than butter here and I am on a tight budget so I am happy with this this combination/method. Also, the amount of herb that I would have smoked in 1 day made enough baked goods to last me 10 days!!! SO MY QUESTION, after all that (LOL) is, do you think I need to roast the herb before putting it in the oil? The above recipe doesn’t call for it but it does call for much more cooking time of the oil – and doesn’t mention oven heating, which I find easy. Alternatively, do you think I could cut the oil heating down to 1hr? I know absolutely nothing about science and I would like to make the process as efficient as possible. I guess it would be easiest to chop the herb, stalk seeds & all, but how would that affect the taste & potency? With my described method there was almost no smell when it was roasting alone or being heated with the oil, and no herb taste in the baked goods. And another thing: back in Canada a guy I used to buy herb cookies from told me to eat something small (like a 2nd, non-herb cookie) 15-20 minutes after ingesting as it would jump-start the high. I find this to be true but am wondering if it just works because I believe it will? Do you know anything about that? Lastly, I found that my baked goods didn’t fully kick in for 45mins – 1hr but the high lasted 4 – 6hrs. Thanks so much for any input you may have! 🙂
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