Heat up your grill on low/medium heat and cut your peach in half. Coat the fruit with the cannabis coconut oil that you have and sprinkle cinnamon over the halves. Put a piece of tinfoil on the grill and once it is warm enough, place the peaches on for about five minutes. They should be warm but not too hot. If they get too hot, they will turn to mush so be careful to keep an eye on them. While the peaches are grilling, you can quickly gather the ingredients for the balsamic vinaigrette. Put all of the greens in a large bowl and top it with the blackberries.
Hamilton Beach makes a line of slow cookers (pictured in this article) that are great for reducing cooking odors when making marijuana oil.  I am sure the fine folks at Hamilton Beach did not design the Stay and Go Slow Cooker for this specific purpose, but nonetheless they work great. That’s because it has a rubber gasket on the lid and a clamp you can use to keep the slow cooker tightly closed.  People going to pot luck suppers (no, not the kinds with cannabis) love this feature as you can transport food in the slow cooker without it sloshing over.  But for cannabis cooks its beauty is in the fact that you will hardly smell the odor of simmering marijuana when infusing butter or oil.  At least not until you open the lid.  I discovered this quite by accident, but it works.  The Stay and Go Slow Cooker is also a quality product to use when making non-cannabis infused meals.  Check it out!
Pour the ounce of ground cannabis into the upper chamber and mix well with the wooden spoon. Allow the mixture to continue to simmer for 30-40 minutes, stirring regularly, until the liquefied butter turns emerald green. While the butter is infusing, wipe out the large mixing bowl that held the cannabis, stretch a piece of cheese cloth across the rim and secure it with a rubber band.
However, making marijuana butter with concentrate is not the same as using traditional bud. Firstly, depending on how the oil is extracted, the THC can be already activated. This means you can skip the process of heating it up—it’s already ready to be used or ingested. Usually dispensaries can direct you to types of dab that have and haven’t undergone the THC activation process. Second, and perhaps more importantly, cannabis oil is an extremely concentrated (hence the nickname!) form of marijuana and can be much more effective than using regular Mary Jane. A good way to measure a comfortable dose is by simply doing the math. If a gram of cannabis oil is 70 percent THC (dispensaries usually disclose this information on the package), that means it contains 700mg of THC. With 48 teaspoons in one cup of butter, each teaspoon serving would boast 14.5mg of THC if you melted the cannabis oil gram with the butter. Most dispensaries have edibles in individual 10mg THC pieces, which is a great starting point for seeing what is comfortable. Another major difference is flavor: Some types of cannabis oil have intense flavors which carry over to whatever you’re cooking. Pick your concentrate carefully, as it can really affect the taste of the dish.
If you are a regular edible consumer or dabber and have a high THC tolerance, you can increase the potency per serving by using less butter. If you mix one gram of BHO with 70 percent THC potency into 1/2-cup butter (48 half-teaspoons), each serving has 14.6mg THC.  If the same 70 percent potency BHO is blended into 1/4-cup butter (24 half-teaspoons), each serving would have 29.2mg THC — making an extra-strong dose.
First, add in the flour, baking soda, and spices. Sift them together well. Take a mixer and beat the butter and sugar together until fluffy. Use something electric for this so you don’t hurt yourself. Add in the eggs and the molasses after that. Slowly add in the flour and separate the dough three times. Wrap each one in plastic wrap and put in the fridge for an hour.
Chefs Melissa Parks and Laurie Wolf (who was dubbed the “Martha Stewart of Marijuana Edibles” by the New York Times) combined their culinary talents to create Herb, a gourmet, cannabis-infused cookbook for all skill levels. With stunning images shot by photographer Bruce Wolf, this collection features hundreds of recipes from appetizers and entrees to drinks and desserts along with a handy guide to understanding dosage and how to make sure the potency of your infused butter or oil stays consistent.
I have been a few batches of High THC cookies when I started making “vegan” cookies for a few friends.Simply put.I used clarified unsalted butter.Well with little extra moisture,I burnt the bottoms of the 1st batch.So I figured.I would try 1,It fucked me up,But tated burnt.The next batch.I said fuck it & cooked them for less time.BIG DIFFERENCE..In cookies,hey will reach the 350 F temp & you will start burning off your THC.BUT in Brownies,which are thicker & moister,the inside doesn’t reach 350 F,so you don’t burn any THC off…When I’m ready to make cookie ONLY ,I decarb my bud at 240 for 20-30 minutes in a Pyrex (name brand- I use a glass pie pan).COVER with foil.Check at 25mins.Then ever 5 minutes.Do not go over 45 mins.Leave to cool COVERED in the glass pan.THUS when cooking,the bud will finish decarbing.FOR ANYTHING ELSE THRN COOKIES….ITS 240 FOR 30-40 MINS,,CHECKING AT 30 MINUTES,45 TOPS .after 45 minutes,you’re burning it off.Beening doing this this was for over 30yrs.
Cannabis Now contributor Jessica Catalano is another strain-specific chef — in fact, she’s the world’s first. She first started posting recipes on her Ganja Kitchen Revolution blog in 2010, choosing strains based on the complementary flavors they add to non-medicated ingredients. The website inspired a book of the same name, where Catalano recommends adding Blue Cheese to biscuits, Pineapple Kush to a piña colada, and Sour Diesel to a Lebanese tabouli. If you can’t afford the book, Catalano still posts plenty of free recipes to her blog.

Mary only recently told her family in Oklahoma about the new turn in her career. “I was so nervous,” she said. “I felt like I was coming out to them.” She was surprised to learn that they were curious about the medical uses of cannabis. One relative, who has chronic pain, started taking a Laurie & MaryJane brownie instead of painkillers to help him sleep. (He got his doctor’s approval.) Another uses their infused coconut oil to treat his aging dog’s epilepsy. (He mixes it with dog food.)

The wake and bake is the most important part of the stoner morning. Without a proper wake and bake, the poor pothead can’t go about their day. So in case you don’t have time to smoke and eat, it’s highly recommended that you eat. But just in case you want to get high while you eat, you can make these super easy wake and bake sandwiches that will fill your stomach and get you perfectly medicated.

First, use a coffee grinder to turn your herb in to a fine powder. As always, the drier the herb, the better. When the herb is ground up, add it in to the crockpot and add the glycerin. It’s best to use a crockpot that has a “Warm” setting. If the tincture is boiling, more THC will dissipate, creating a lesser effect with the end product. Leave the tincture on warm for 24 hours. Stir it occasionally. You can also test it but BE CAREFUL! Glycerin holds heat in and gets extremely hot! Don’t burn yourself.
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All of this has produced a new category of cannabis user: people trying it for the first time, to see what the fuss is about, or coming back to it after a decades-long hiatus. Businesspeople see a future in which cannabis is part of a functional, even aspirational life style. Like Julia Child introducing Americans to French cuisine, Wolf serves as both a guide and an ambassador to this world. She was a chef and a food editor for many years, and she stands out as a source of reliable information in a nascent industry without dependable methods for cooking and dosing. Ricardo Baca, the founding editor of the Cannabist, told me, “Laurie represents a voice in the food-and-cannabis space that can be trusted.” Her columns are full of global ingredients and lush food photography meant to attract what she calls “the CB2 and West Elm crowd.” Her books would not seem out of place on the shelf next to the latest tome from the Barefoot Contessa or Yotam Ottolenghi. Evan Senn, the editor of the California-based cannabis magazine Culture, told me that, increasingly, foodies are the target audience for pot. “I love to drink wine, and I’m kind of a snob about it,” she said. “I’m not going to drink Franzia out of a cardboard box. I’m going to buy a nice bottle of Pinot Noir and aerate it and enjoy it. I have the same approach to edibles.”
Cannabis Now contributor Laurie Wolf sells small batch cheese crisps and brownie bites at Oregon dispensaries. But if you’re not in the state, her cookbook will help you replicate those treats — and tons of others — at home. With elevated recipes for dishes like a tomahawk ribeye and bruschetta with ricotta and peas, this is the book you should turn to if you’re prepping an elegant dinner party. In fact, “Herb” has been called the “the authoritative volume on how to cook with cannabis” by celebrity chef Michael Ruhlman — who won a James Beard Award for his own book — so you know it’s good.
We pulled up to Wolf’s “office,” a commercial kitchen called the Bitchin’ Kitchen, which was home to seventeen edible-marijuana startups. It has industrial-sized ovens, steel countertops, and a walk-in refrigerator with a vault door. Wolf opened a freezer to show me seventeen pounds of marijuana-infused butter. She and Mary made a fresh batch every week.

Most people do not like the green herbal flavor of marijuana shining through their foods. Likewise recipes with lots of spices and flavors going on tend to mask this better than delicate and subtle fare. Use as much or a little more seasoning and flavor adding ingredients (such as onion and garlic) when cooking with cannabis than you would if you were cooking without marijuana.
In the spirit of St Patrick’s Day, making everything that we eat/use/interact with green is kind of part of the holiday. What better way to wake up on a holiday like this then with a medicated breakfast of green eggs and ham? The following recipe will not only give you weed infused eggs and ham but they’re actually green as well, making them the perfect breakfast for a festive stoner.
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please help me with this confusion. Ideally, decarboxylation takes place at a temperature just over 200 for about just under an hour. This is accomplished in boiling water, which reaches and maintains about 212 degrees. So if I boil the herb at that temp for an hour, isn’t that decarboxylating it? Why do it in the oven first and then do it again in the saucepan? What am I missing?
“It depends on if you’re in a state where you can legally access it, or if you’re in a prohibition state,” says McDonough. Most cookbooks and guides provide a way to evaluate the quality of your cannabis and give it a ballpark THC percentage, which will help the home cook calculate it. “It’s better than nothing, but it’s still not very precise,” she says.
Long considered a closeted activity, cooking with cannabis isn’t just for the super stoner anymore. As legalized marijuana use – for both medicinal and recreational purposes – continues to gain support across the country, home cooks are starting to incorporate cannabis into everyday meals. Yes, some people just want to get buzzed. But others want to alleviate chronic pain, lessen anxiety and sleep better. And they want to do it without smoking.
In the U.K. I can get 30ml thc oil (unnamed Indica) with 125mg (20%) THC in for £85, or buy 3.5 ounces of 9lb Hammer for around £50. I don’t know if you could hazard a guess as to whether making my own would be more cost effective, but I’m guessing it would be. Chemo fog has rendered me incapable of basic logic skills, but saying that, you’re not my math teacher so don’t worry if you’ve no idea!
The Marijuana Cookbook is special because it is a collection of recipes submitted by the members of a facebook fanpage, and I am pretty sure it is the first book conceived and written by the fans of a facebook page. And if sharing your recipe is the reason that you’re here on the Book’s website, then I would like to thank you in advance for submitting your Marijuana Medible Recipe
Because alcohol extractions are typically used for tinctures, we will focus on fat based extractions for traditional edibles. For increased bioavailability, we suggest using coconut oil, which is high in medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). The reason being that MCTs are small, and easily digested relative to the long chain triglycerides (LCTs) found in most fatty foods (olive oil, canola oil or butter). Unlike other types of fats, MCTs don’t need to be broken down before they’re used for energy, and they don’t require any extra energy to digest or absorb. This makes the use of coconut oil especially helpful for those who suffer from impaired fat digestion and gallbladder issues. Note the MCT oil, which is comprised of 100% MCTs, can also be used.
Even if marijuana is legal in your state, do not assume it is legal in surrounding states or legal for you to consume. Also do not assume that law enforcement had no authority to arrest you for possession. Although in the United States pot consumption may be legal at the state level, it is still illegal under federal law. Furthermore, strong regulations exist at all levels. Consult your local law enforcement officials for more information about your area's marijuana regulations.
Begin by placing the cannabutter (or regular butter) and the ham in a larger frying pan. Take the eggs that you have ready and crack them in to a mixing bowl, making sure to whisk them together well, so that all of the yolks are broken. Grind up your marijuana very fine (it’s a good idea to use a coffee grinder and to be sure that your weed is incredibly dry) and add it in to your eggs. This is also where you add in your food coloring, making the eggs green in two different ways.

Begin by placing the cannabutter (or regular butter) and the ham in a larger frying pan. Take the eggs that you have ready and crack them in to a mixing bowl, making sure to whisk them together well, so that all of the yolks are broken. Grind up your marijuana very fine (it’s a good idea to use a coffee grinder and to be sure that your weed is incredibly dry) and add it in to your eggs. This is also where you add in your food coloring, making the eggs green in two different ways.


The recipes on this site are calculated on using a 1/2 ounce to 1 cup butter, which in most cases will be pretty strong (depending on the strength of the cannabis of course). When cooking for myself, I will often double that. Also making stronger infusions let’s you use less of them to get the same dose, which can improve flavor. So amounts are a suggestion and cannabis cooks should always take the amounts given in ANY recipe with a grain of salt and adjust upwards or downwards according to their own needs. My free dosing class can help you do that.

So yeah, testing this hash butter made me melt into the floor and feel like I just wasn’t going to make it to see another day. Let my mistake stand as a reminder that you really need to be conscious of dosing your edibles. Even an experienced edibles writer sometimes gets hungry and eats half of a grilled cheese without calculating dosage first and spends half of her afternoon asking the farmer to remind her that she’s not, in fact, dying.
Your recipe will need to contain either a fat or an oil-based ingredient that can be infused with the cannabis concentrate. Such fats include butter, ghee, lard, shortening and other vegetable or nut oils. If your recipe does not list a “fat” ingredient, you can dilute the cannabis concentrate in a small amount of your favorite spirits: vodka, rum, cognac, etc.

This book, based on the Munchies and Viceland television series “Bong Appétit,” was published in October by Ten Speed Press. (This is in itself notable, as Ten Speed is one of the best cookbook publishers around, and continues the legitimate trajectory of the cannabis cooking genre.) The book has a comprehensive introduction that includes topics such as dosing, techniques, methods of decarboxylation and infusion, cannabis pairing tips, questions to ask your dispensary, tips on equipment and more. The recipes are sourced from the Munchies test kitchen and from many well-known chefs, whose recipes are recalibrated to add cannabis. Thus: Korean fried chicken from Deuki Hong of San Francisco’s Sunday Bird; fried soft-shell crab with shishito pepper mole from Daniela Soto-Innes of Cosme and Atla; and (my favorite) Joan Nathan’s preserved lemons. The Munchies test kitchen also has some fun ones, including herb focaccia with, well, herb; and confit octopus, in which a whole octopus is poached in cannabis-infused olive oil. If that sounds too aspirational, there are instructions for making an apple bong — a hollowed-out apple filled with weed-infused mezcal — at the end of the drinks chapter.


What could be better then enjoying your summer nights with this dish? For those of you who love fish dishes in the summer, this recipe will be for you! This amazing dish is easy to prepare and will give you an amazing medicated salmon that your friends will absolutely adore. The following recipe will make four servings so if you plan on making it for more or less, be sure to adjust the ingredients accordingly.
By the time you finish mixing together your marijuana/egg/food coloring mix, the ham that’s been cooking should be done. Remember to keep an eye on it while mixing up the eggs as well, to make sure that it doesn’t burn. When the ham has finished cooking to your liking, pour the eggs over the ham in the frying pan. Continue to cook the eggs and ham together until the eggs are scrambled (it shouldn’t take too long). Serve up your green eggs and ham with some toast (preferably with medicated butter or jelly on top!) and enjoy your holiday!
With such an awesome title, how can you not be intrigued as to how to make this amazing holiday treat? It’s medicated, delicious, and can make the perfect addition to a holiday party or as a present. These cookies are your normal medicated chocolate chip cookies but with a twist! Theres vanilla pudding added in as well, giving these cookies a different taste then what most people are used to. This will definitely give you the upper hand at winning who makes the best cannabis cookies!
SInce I have no t lab tested after using the Ardent Lyft, I can’t say for sure how well it works, but mine seems to work fine. It does take longer than what I typically do in the oven, but it seems to work. I have no idea what the tcheck device is, but I do know that home testing is wildly inaccurate (so much so as to be useless), so don’t know as you should much stock in the 0% cause that does not seem right. I use trim all the time, it’s great economical cooking material. Using trim should not be an issue at all. The slow cooker, with water added, is my personal favorite way of infusing oil or butter. Hope this helps.
Eating your weed is an awesome way to medicate. There’s no gross after taste, no smell, and you can get really high. These Oreo cookie snacks are simple to make and you only need a few things. Being creative as a stoner not only applies to fine arts but to making food as well. Creative stoney masterpieces out of food is a quality that most people don’t possess. Stoners everywhere love to create their own concoctions too! If you ever have any recipes to submit, email them to [email protected]
In those days, dispensaries catered to what Wolf calls “the medical-stoner community,” heavy users and people with chronic pain. The edible offerings were informal. “You’d say, ‘What kind of edibles do you have?’ They’d say, ‘Well, my grandmother makes these pot brownies. And my stepmother’s cousin makes these.’ ” The dosage was usually very high—over a hundred milligrams of THC in a single brownie. The taste was “dreadful,” Wolf said. “It was like somebody took a bud and dipped it in chocolate.”
After assembling your materials, put your cannabis butter on low (REALLY LOW) heat on the stove the melt it. Take half of your Oreos and crush them up with the half of the Heath bars and add them to the butter. Put the other half of the crumbs on the inside of a 9×13 pan. Cover the crumbs as best as you can with the 1/2 gallon of ice cream. Then, take the butter and crumb mix and coat the top of the ice cream. Take your favorite flavor of syrup and cover the top layer. Stick this whole pan in the freezer and let it freeze. After a few hours, you’ll have a dank treat that will get you extremely baked… And taste so good!
My guess is YES! And You have come to the right place, we have listed The Top 10 Stoner Snacks | Do it Yourself at Home. These items are cheap and easy to find and are most likely in your kitchen right now as we speak! So go ahead stoners GET STONED and be creative or simply just use this awesome stoner snack food list to satisfy your munchie needs. Stay Blazed!
I messed up a batch. I’m hoping I can save it. I have a MB2 machine, but I didn’t have enough “stuff” (butter and buds) to get the the minimum fill line on there. So I added water to the minimum fill line. I also added some lecithin. Now I have a watery, sludgey mess. Can I put it in the oven at like 220 and evaporate the water, or is the whole batch jacked?
Cons: Without cannabinoids in the body, tolerance is very low so any exposure to THC smoke will result in a psychoactive rush many users try to avoid, so even though there are just a few parts of THC per CBD, smoking the oil is not recommended for those with very low tolerance. Also, smoking may agitate the throat and lungs, so heavy coughing may result.
Generally speaking, lower cooking temperatures are better. THC is completely degraded at temperatures in excess of 392 degrees F although it starts to break down long before that. Since water boiling never gets above 212 degrees F, I always recommend adding water when making cannabis infusions (see point 2 above).  You will also need to pay attention to cooking temperatures when using the infused butter and oils, or when cooking with marijuana concentrates. Do not use infused marijuana oils for direct sautéing for frying. If you are making something battered, make sure the medicated part is inside the batter. You can cook at oven temperatures up to 375 degrees F, as the food itself will not get that hot.
Hi Cheri, I made what I thought was a double-infused oil with 4 oz of decarbed trim and 3c of coconut oil. I made it in two batches because the volume of trim was much higher than the oil. For the second batch of new trim I used the same infused 3c of oil. I thought I would have rocket launchers for my final product but I don’t. Is it true that oil has a saturation point? Perhaps I over infused and ended up sadly wasting a lot of my product? And, if I simply reheated the infused oil for another hour without the trim would it extract more? Thanks in advance for your response.
StonerDays Cookbook Persimmon Bread is not like your Grandma’s . This is a stoners little twist on Grandmother’s Persimmon Bread Recipe. Not only does this bread taste delicious and make you feel good it also calls for fresh persimmons, which are a super sweet fruit full of vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants. It stays good for about a week and is a bread that does well freezing for later too. Enjoy!
This can add a nice flavor and depth to some recipes, while in others it just plain tastes bad. Baked takes this into account and shows you how to make cannabis infused baked goods that taste great and look great too. There are over 60 recipes including Baked Fudge, Marshmallow Meltdown and Coco Nutty Lime Cookies, and even gluten free recipes for anyone with gluten sensitivites.
In the U.K. I can get 30ml thc oil (unnamed Indica) with 125mg (20%) THC in for £85, or buy 3.5 ounces of 9lb Hammer for around £50. I don’t know if you could hazard a guess as to whether making my own would be more cost effective, but I’m guessing it would be. Chemo fog has rendered me incapable of basic logic skills, but saying that, you’re not my math teacher so don’t worry if you’ve no idea!

Marijuana is oil-based, so knowing this is very important when it comes to cooking with cannabis. THC is the pyschoactive property in Marijuana and is contained in the capitate glands that cover its leaves, but the flowers / marijuana buds contain the most THC. When cooking or baking with marijuana, you should always use an oil-based product, such as butter or vegetable oil, as these do a great job at dissolving the capitate glands and releasing the THC. There are a few basic ways of using the cannabis plant for cooking: one is to make butter aka cannabutter and the other is to make flour. Another way is to make Marijuana Alcohol, which you can learn about in our marijuana beverages section. Either way you choose to make your marijuana induced foods requires the use of either the cannabis plant leaves and clippings or using the finished marijuana buds, which is my preference as it is by far the most potent way of making Weed Butter (Cannabutter). You can cook with cannaoil in any recipe that calls for oil.

How do you grind your weed? You can use a quality cannabis grinder which you can buy at our store. You can use a food processor or a coffee grinder, although you’d probably want to designate a processor or coffee grinder specifically for that use (unless you don’t mind leaving a little residual flavor, which could be a good thing if you like your morning cup of Joe to taste like Bubba Kush).

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