All you have to do to get your medicated mayo is whisk together the egg yolks, the salt, vinegar, lemon juice, and mustard together. Make sure it’s mixed up well. Slowly add in the cannabis oil while still whisking the mixture. Do this carefully or risk making a huge mess. Once the oil is completely added in, continue to whisk the mixture until is begins to thicken. If it gets too thick, you can add a few drops of water to get the right consistency. Put the mayo in an airtight container and let it chill in the refrigerator for about two hours.
Published in 2015 by a Colorado writer and photographer, this cookbook collects recipes from a dozen chefs and one bartender who specialize in cannabis-infused food. Before the recipes, there’s a 100-plus-page section that provides biographies of the chefs and discusses many aspects of buying, identifying and cooking with cannabis, covering cooking cultivars, details on infusions and extractions, plus dosing tips. There’s a longer section on how to make the oils and butters and tinctures than in many books; it also includes recipes for infused milk, cream, honey and simple syrup, all of which makes the recipes that follow succinct. The dosage per serving is clearly stated, and the recipe headnotes often include nicely geeky bits, such as how mangoes are reputed to heighten the effects of cannabis because they’re high (ha-ha) in myrcene molecules. Thus a recipe for rice pudding with green cardamom, mango and pistachios.
Cannabis infused butter, otherwise known as cannabutter, is a primary ingredient in many marijuana-infused recipes. Cannabis butter is technically an ‘extraction’ method whereby the cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are extracted from the cannabis plant and infused into the butter fats. The butter from a normal recipe is then substituted with cannabutter to produce psychoactive effects. Cannabis butter is often used in decadent edible recipes (such as brownies), but ultimately its use depends on the cook and his/her personal preferences and/or their dietary needs. It can be made from dried or decarboxylated cannabis buds, trim, solvent-less hash or even sugar leaf.

How to make Marinated Mushrooms with Marijuana! This is really exciting, and these mushrooms can be served with rice, fish, cut up in soups, or eaten alone and can add some much needed flare to your meal. Being that mushrooms are so diverse, there’s really no limit to what you can do with these and they also would make a great topping on pizza. You can think of these guys as a much more tasty, much more milder form of psychedelic mushrooms. Now that you’re more than eager to have a taste, let’s cook some!
In a legal state, home cooks have access not only to lab-tested fresh product but sometimes also to lab-tested butters and oils. Some who prefer to infuse at home rely on online potency calculators, of which there are several. Sites like Wikileaf catalog the potency of different strains, and home potency-testing tools are starting to hit the market.
Mary Poppins wasn’t just blowing smoke when she sang, “Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.” There’s proof lining the shelves of dispensaries across the country, and the choices in infused edibles have never been better. But for some patients, it’s more complicated than choosing between Dr. Robert’s Chocolate Trip Cookie and Compassion Edibles’ Traditional French Chocolate Tainted Truffles. People with special dietary …

Combine in your glass jar, 3 ounces of drinking alcohol with your ounce of hash oil, or in a 3:1 ratio, according to the strength of your hash oil.  Seal the mixture and put it in the freezer for 6 or more days, shaking a few times per day.  Now store your tincture in your one ounce eye drop bottles.  Before taking, you should first calculate how much thc each dropper, and each drop holds, according to the strength of the hash oil and how much you’ve used.  This method has the most easy method of consumption.  Use the eye dropper to squirt a measured amount of weed tincture under the tongue, hold for half a minute, then swallow it down.  The thc and other cannabinoids will bring health benefits, but the psychoactive ingredients will have less effect because it may not have been activated by heat.  As with any oral consumption, effects come on slow and then goes stronger for longer.  It is important to make sure you know how much cannabinoids you are consuming, and not to re-dose before the effects take hold, which can take as much as one to two hours.
The first thing you must do if cooking with cannabis is to activate the THC and/or CBD. And that requires heat. The process you will use to do this is called decarboxylation. This is what will give your edibles the “buzz” you want. Beyond that, however, raw cannabis placed directly into recipes will not allow the range of cannabinoids found in the plant to activate and bind to fat. You will just be wasting cannabis, in other words. And who wants that?
The main concerns when decarbing, according to McDonough, are burning the cannabis or toasting it too long at too high a temperature. She recommends checking on it frequently and stirring it up if it gets too brown around the edges. The THC will evaporate at 392 degrees Fahrenheit/200 degrees Celsius, and at higher temps the THC starts converting to cannabinol, or CBN, a cannabinoid known for making people sleepy.
Thank you for pointing that out. I will go in and rewrite to avoid confusion. You DEFINITELY want to decarb if the hash will not be cooked. If you are using hash in a cooked dish, the process of cooking can decarb it, HOWEVER, for maximum potency I recommend decarbing first in either instance. A medical marijuana provider friend of mine in WA state did an experiment by making 2 pans of brownies. In one he used kief that had not been decarbed, in the other kief that had been decarbed. Even though the process of baking the brownies will debarb some of the THC, he found the pan of brownies made with the kief that had been decarbed, lab tested about 30% higher than the other. SO my motto is decarb first in either instance.
Hamilton Beach makes a line of slow cookers (pictured in this article) that are great for reducing cooking odors when making marijuana oil.  I am sure the fine folks at Hamilton Beach did not design the Stay and Go Slow Cooker for this specific purpose, but nonetheless they work great. That’s because it has a rubber gasket on the lid and a clamp you can use to keep the slow cooker tightly closed.  People going to pot luck suppers (no, not the kinds with cannabis) love this feature as you can transport food in the slow cooker without it sloshing over.  But for cannabis cooks its beauty is in the fact that you will hardly smell the odor of simmering marijuana when infusing butter or oil.  At least not until you open the lid.  I discovered this quite by accident, but it works.  The Stay and Go Slow Cooker is also a quality product to use when making non-cannabis infused meals.  Check it out!
Cannabis infused cooking oils, commonly referred to as canna oils, are popular among many medical marijuana patients and caregivers looking to infuse everything from salad dressings to dipping sauces to baked goods. Most oils are vegan-friendly and extremely easy to add into recipes with savory meals like steak or chicken. Additionally, infused cooking oils may serve as a healthy substitute for butter in many recipes. These factors make marijuana-infused cooking oils a must-have for most medical marijuana patients when it comes to cooking with cannabis at home. How to Make Cannabis Infused Cooking Oil (Canna Oil) Ingredients 6 cups extra …
The recipes in this book are quite different than what I was expecting, but are delicious nonetheless. The instructions for making cannabutter/ghee and cannaflour are very useful, though in practice not always as easy as stated. All the recipes are very easily adapted to exclude the cannabis, and are very good on their own. Many recipes call for adding fresh pot to the dish (e.g. tossing ground buds into a salad, or stirring some into guacamole), and the taste can be quite strong. This cookbook isn't for someone just looking for brownie and cookie recipes. Many dishes included are somewhat labour intensive, but are certainly beneficial for medicinal marijuana patients looking to maintain a steady level of THC in their bodies, as the book contains recipes for any time of day. I would suggest trying a recipe out first without the pot, to work out any kinks. The recipes are meant to replace smoking marijuana (as that was the author's goal), so the proportions might seem a bit staggering at first. It's hard to watch 1/4 oz. get turned into hot chocolate, but that's why I suggest trying the recipes out pot-free first. It's easier than wasting good bud on a dish you don't like. All in all, it's a good cookbook, with well-thought-out recipes, and many interesting facts about cannabis and the people who've made history in the world of pot.
Ratios and amounts are a personal thing. The recipes on this site use 1/2 ounce per cup of butter, for myself i usually use double that amount. Take my free dosing class to learn more at http://www.Cannademy.com. I am not a fan of the Magical Butter Machine and do not recommend it as I do not recommend finely grinding your plant material and machine forces you to do that.
The first step in any weed bake is to choose a high-quality strain of weed, then make it super-strong by decarboxylating it, which is a fancy word that means to bake it on a baking sheet at 240 degrees for 25 mins to an hour, depending on how much weed you’re using for making edibles. This will concentrate the bud and convert more of the cannabinoids to the potent thc that you want.
Sayegh is at the forefront of a growing movement to reimagine cannabis in the kitchen, and he’s become known for his many-coursed gourmet THC-infused dinners in a style he describes as “French with Italian and Middle Eastern influence.” But tonight his gingerbread construction—which he’s created for a party benefitting the victims of a warehouse fire in Northern California—is just for show. Sayegh hasn’t lab-tested the village, so he doesn’t know how potent it might be, and he won’t serve imprecisely dosed food. Once upon a time, the menu included cannabis-infused appetizers to appease guests salivating over the off-limits village, but it turns out cocktails are on offer at this party, and mixing cannabis edibles with liquor can make for a “dizzy” experience, he says; he doesn’t serve them together. Guests still partake of his hors d’oeuvres, but they’re made solely from non-mind-expanding ingredients. Navigating such things are all part of the job; complications traditional chefs have never pondered.
Start off by preheating your oven to 350 degrees and combining both the Chex cereal and the pretzels in a large mixing bowl and stir them together. Then, in a medium saucepan begin to melt the cannabutter and when it’s melted, stir in the garlic powder, salt, and Worcestershire sauce. While that simmers (as always, never boil the cannabutter or you’ll lose the THC), spread the cereal and pretzels mix on a cookie sheet and pour half of the butter mix over them using a spatula and spoon. Toss the remaining butter mixture well while you bake the trail mix on the cookie sheet for five minutes. When the five minutes is up, repeat the previous step, pouring the butter over the cookie sheet. Let the mix cool and then sprinkle some crushed cannabis over the top and toss it together. Once you do that, your trail mix is ready to be packaged up and enjoyed!
Those statements have nothing to do with the other. First off hash does have smell and taste, that’s one of the reasons we love it, so not sure where you are getting that. Hash is made from kief that has been pressed, so decarbing happens in the process. If you are going to smoke it, you don’t need to decarb, but for cooking you would. Hope this helps.
Put the half-and-half, cannamilk, cornstarch, salt, and sugar in to a large saucepan and whisk everything together thoroughly. Cook the mixture over medium heat while constantly stirring until it starts to thicken, about ten minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and set it aside. In a seperate container, whisk together the eggs and gradually add in a cup of the cannacream from the saucepan. Place the hot cannacream and to yolk mixture in to the saucepan and continue to whisk it constantly.
Dosing remains highly individualized and varies according to your symptoms and strength of the cannabis strain being used. As a general rule, try and maintain easily understood ratios between amounts of cannabis and butter or oil being infused. If your infused oil or butter is particularly strong, consider using only half infused and half non-infused, or whichever ratio works best for your specific needs. It’s incredibly important to keep your edibles out of reach of children or anyone else in your household who should not be using them. Make sure your edibles are properly marked and stashed safely away.
After making several batches of cookies over the past year, in my opinion decarbing your weed before making butter might not be necessary. I noticed a weaker high when eating a decarbed cookie vs and undecarbed cookie. This is all anecdotal but that’s how I feel. The cooking process while making the butter which is a 3 hour long boil and while the cookies are being baked, should be enough. But those cookies jack me up more than any other edible I have ever purchased. I will always make my own.

I love the taste of smoked or vaped cannabis. I do not like the taste of it in my food. Most people do not, but I know a handful of folks who do. But from a culinary/flavor profile/foodie perspective, most often the flavor of cannabis does not enhance most recipes. Your taking offense to this is the equivalent of getting mad at someone because they don’t like the flavor of broccoli, or beer, or whatever. It’s just silly. If you like it, more power to you, cannabis cooking is a whole lot easier for you. But most of my readers do not like a strong cannabis flavor in their food and neither do I.


Depending on how many baked goods you’d like to make, it should be somewhat easy to divide it up accordingly, once you’ve determined how many mgs of THC you have in your batch. The maximum legal amount in recreationally available edibles ranges from 5mg to 20mg per edible, depending on state law, however you’re not bound by these limitations. If you’re not sure about your perfect dose or are inexperienced with edibles, 3-5 mgs would be a good starting point.
Support for legalized marijuana has increased exponentially over the last couple of decades. According to the Pew Research Center, 61 percent of Americans now support legalization, compared to just 31 percent in 2000. In the West, weed is a way of life: Recreational use is legal in Washington, Oregon, California, Colorado, Nevada and Alaska. And as legalization spreads to other states – it’s on the ballot in Michigan this November – many expect other entrepreneurs to lean on the example set by innovative Westerners. 
So yeah, testing this hash butter made me melt into the floor and feel like I just wasn’t going to make it to see another day. Let my mistake stand as a reminder that you really need to be conscious of dosing your edibles. Even an experienced edibles writer sometimes gets hungry and eats half of a grilled cheese without calculating dosage first and spends half of her afternoon asking the farmer to remind her that she’s not, in fact, dying.
“I cook for a lot of sick people out there,” he says. “I don’t charge to do this. They acquire the cannabis, and I’ll go there and cook a meal for them. The most important thing is, when I go and cook, I teach them how to do it themselves. Because I can’t feed everybody on a constant basis, and for a lot of people, this is not recreational. This is a lifestyle change they’re making, that they can actually use cannabis they’ve been prescribed for medicinal purposes.”
Great recipe choices and I like the dosage information. The book has clear explanations of the correct mindset to have when cooking with Cannabis, take it slow, It's an attractive book with the content I want. The recipes are more like comfort food to me, but I like that. Somebody stated in a review that the recipes were weak. They are supposed to be. There are too many variable that change the effect: quality of product, tolerance of the person consuming the food, etc. Cooking is about enjoying the food and experience, not getting blasted. It's not cool to lose control. Anyway, great content and great approach to the subject matter. Thank you, High Times.
You’ll first want to know which family the marijuana you’re cooking with belongs to. “There’s sativa, which is more uplifting, and [gives you] more energy and focus,” Jeff explains. “Indica is the opposite, it’s a much more relaxed feeling. An indica-based strain will make you chill, relaxed. It will give you what people refer to as couch-lock, where you’re pretty much just hanging out and don’t really want to move.”
It was the Instagram account—where he posts things like artfully plated cannabis-infused foie gras custard with blackberry gelée, fish with radish marinated in a cannabis-vinegar blend, and peppercorn-crusted strip steak in a medicated Cabernet Sauvignon reduction—that led to his first private dinner. Things snowballed from there. Now, in addition to his restaurant ambitions and dinners, he’s gearing up for a TV show he describes as “Anthony Bourdain meets Bear Grylls”. The restaurant alone has presented a list of challenges not faced by traditional restaurateurs, from training cooks and waiters to work with cannabis to finding a landlord willing to rent to him.
Have all equipment ready because you have to move fast to make candy. Drop your water, corn syrup, and sugar into your saucepan and cook on high until the sugar dissolves. Now drop to medium heat for 15 mins then check with the thermometer until you reach 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Now remove from heat and add your drops of green food coloring, canna oil and peppermint flavoring. Pour your liquid into the pan and let it cool. Once it is semi-hard, use your molds or scissors to cut it into your desired shape. If you have used a half ounce of weed in your oil, cut into 14 or 28 pieces the size of a jolly rancher. Now toss the pieces into the pan buttered with canna butter or oil and get them nice and greasy. Next, take your baking dish and cover it in powdered sugar. Take the greasy candy pieces and roll them in the powdered sugar. Next, insert the lollipop sticks and let your candy harden. Now you have weed lollipops with the appropriate doses. Each lollipop is a bowl of smoked weed. Use this simple recipe and you will impress your friends and have a great way to enjoy the effects of marijuana without smoking, and without having to eat cookies or brownies. Even though it’s sugar, you will tend to take in fewer calories with candies than with baked cookies.
As to “mud” I would have had to see it to be sure what the cause is. Was there dirt or roots in the mix? Actual dirt should be gently washed off – gently you don’t want to remove trichomes. If not, it sounds like maybe the plant material was too finely ground. I know a lot cooks recommend grinding the plants finely (and the Magic Butter Machine does it automatically). But I have found it is better to just rough grind as if you were rolling a joint, or even just crumble the plant material with your fingers. What you are trying to extract is ON the plant, not within it, and I find that over grinding just adds extra plant material and green taste to the final product.
Healthy eating is important in the life of a stoner! Stir fry has always been a favorite of mine and now you can make it medicated! It’s a far cry from the food we made in Home Ec in middle school but it tastes even better, now that we’re old enough not to burn the veggies to the pan. You can add in veggies or meats if you feel like it and of course, more bud if you feel inclined. Just always remember that eating cannabis is much different than smoking cannabis and you should always know your tolerance before eating too much!

Cons: Without cannabinoids in the body, tolerance is very low so any exposure to THC smoke will result in a psychoactive rush many users try to avoid, so even though there are just a few parts of THC per CBD, smoking the oil is not recommended for those with very low tolerance. Also, smoking may agitate the throat and lungs, so heavy coughing may result.
Edibles are yummy treats infused with marijuana that deliver the medicinal and psychoactive ingredients to your system without having to smoke. They are a fun, convenient and covert way to consume cannabis, whether for recreation or medical purposes. The cannabis cookbooks in this list have tons of recipes to help you make the most delicious sweet or savory Mary Jane treats.
Substitute your marijuana infused butter for regular butter.[9] Unlike with oils, most recipes use small amounts of butter for flavor. You can substitute the entire recipe amount with marijuana butter. If you find that you are not getting the needed medicinal effect, consider increasing the amount of marijuana per stick of butter to a half an ounce. Alternately, you can use a different method of cooking with marijuana.
Not to be outdone, Netflix pushed out its own marijuana cooking show this summer: Cooking on High, which pits two chefs against each other to create THC-enhanced dishes for a panel of judges, punctuated by cannabis education from loveable pothead comedian Ngaio Bealum. Though critical reception of the fell flat, some of the chefs and personalities featured within seem destined for another, better executed vehicle for stardom. One standout was Andrea Drummer, whose delectable cod cake sandwich made her the winner of the show’s first episode. Drummer trained at Le Cordon Bleu, and oddly enough used to work as a drug prevention counselor before getting into weed cooking about five years ago.
Because marijuana in food takes longer to metabolize, it will take longer for it to affect you. Expect to feel the effects in about 30 minutes to an hour.[16] Expect the effects to last longer as well compared to smoking. You will not get the same effects due to the differences in how the body absorbs the cannabinoids. Be careful not to overdose by overeating when the effects are not as strong as desired.

Since this recipe is designed to be pretty stoney, your first step is to heat up your THC oil in a medium sized pan over low heat. Add in your keif as well and let it simmer. Never let the mixture boil, as you’ll lose precious THC to the heat. Allow to simmer for about ten minutes, stirring constantly and keeping an eye on it. You can add more keif in if you want or if you’d prefer a less strong end result, you can substitute normal olive oil for the THC oil. Remember that eating you cannabis effects you differently then smoking it and you should know your tolerance before making your edibles too strong.
The hard crunchy texture of paunut brittle is like candy and great for continuous munching throughout the day. The peanuts mixed with the cannabis can also act as a brain booster and wouldn’t be a bad idea for a snack if you’ve got some thinking planned somewhere in your day. This is one of those high treats that’s so easy to keep eating and before you know it you’ve got this beautiful buzz going on, some pretty amazing brittle. Learn How to Make Marijuana Peanut Brittle!
How to Make Cannabis Infused Rice Crispy Treats Even though we are all adults here, we all crave the comfort foods of our childhood from time to time. Honestly, who can resist the ooey-gooey goodness of melted marshmallow mixed with warm rice crispies — especially when they are infused with your favorite plant? Talk about an irresistible combination for nearly anyone but diabetics. Making a good batch of weed infused rice crispy treats comes down to using high-quality ingredients and following a few simple directions. Use this helpful step-by-step guide to get started with your first batch of canna-crispies: You …
Because oils are slow-acting and long-lasting, it’s recommended that you start low, and go slow when experimenting with oils. They’re a much more concentrated version of flowers and buds and can have some unpleasant side effects like nausea, dizziness, thirst, and a drop in blood sugar levels if you go too quickly. Taking the oil with food in your stomach has been known to minimize nausea.
If you were looking for the perfect game-day snack to serve to all your pals, then search no more! This nacho cheese is creamy cheesy bliss and when the high kicks in while the game’s on it won’t matter if your team wins or not, either way you’ll be happy dipping crunchy chips into this dip again and again. Both canna-butter and canna olive oil can be used in this dip so be prepared for some pretty potent bites.
Cannabis edibles have come a long way from brownies and cookies. Just ask Cheri Sicard, nicknamed the “Martha Stewart of weed” by The Daily Beast, who serves up the most definitive guide to cooking with cannabis in The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. Featuring a comprehensive introduction to the history and benefits of cannabis, a fool-proof guide to finding your perfect dose, and 60 reliable recipes that redefine stoner eats, this cookbook makes eating homemade edibles easy.
Decarbing…. it sounds like your oven is not going to cut it for that. The slow cooker, unfortunately, does not get hot enough to properly do the job. I even tried under pressure in my Instant Pot and it only worked so-so. I don’t imagine you have a sous vide machine, most people don’t, but if you did this would work. It is basically a boil in bag but very temperature controlled. The other solution is a bit pricey, but I do like the Ardent decarboxylator as it takes away all the guesswork and gives perfect results every time (enter the coupon code CANNACHERI and $30 bucks off, thanks to the reader who asked for a discount code cause the company gave me one http://bit.ly/cheri-ardent). You can read my review of this gadget at https://www.cannabischeri.com/lifestyle/reviews/cannabis-product-reviews-ardent-decarboxylator-nova/ .
Basil traveled from Chicago to attend Feast and signed up for the Sugar High class because he’s “just fascinated by the whole phenomenon of edibles,” he said. He’s never cooked with cannabis before but figured if he came to Portland, a city known for pot, he might be able to pick up a few pointers. A carpenter by trade, Basil has dealt with carpel tunnel problems in both hands for the last few years. 
Hi Cheri, I made what I thought was a double-infused oil with 4 oz of decarbed trim and 3c of coconut oil. I made it in two batches because the volume of trim was much higher than the oil. For the second batch of new trim I used the same infused 3c of oil. I thought I would have rocket launchers for my final product but I don’t. Is it true that oil has a saturation point? Perhaps I over infused and ended up sadly wasting a lot of my product? And, if I simply reheated the infused oil for another hour without the trim would it extract more? Thanks in advance for your response.
Cons: Because cannabinoids are multiplied and long lasting by eating, the effect can be intense, and any amount of THC will be amplified. A narcotic effect can be possible if supplemental cannabinoids are foreign to your body. A tolerance to the high, if any effect persists, will be quick to come within a few rounds of application so it is advised to go with the flow and be patient for the High CBD Hash Oil to work as intended. Some users however report not feeling any effect on High CBD medication because it is mostly non-psychoactive. Allow enough time to feel a desired effect because everybody’s metabolism is different. On average users will feel the effect after 2 hours of consumption but some users report not feeling any effect until 3 or 4 hours after ingesting medication, so you must be patient. Results will vary. Cooking cannabis is about as labor intensive as making candy. To those that have done it before, it can be very easy but the first time can be tough. The ratios of cannabinoids can be tough to navigate so keep an open mind as to how many cannabinoids you may actually consume at one time.
Hukill called 2.8 milligrams “perfect for a beginner,” adding that marijuana edibles are not meant to be consumed en masse. In other words, when you ingest edibles and get the munchies, reach for something else. Another tip: Remember that cannabis-infused foods take longer to get into your system compared to smoking or vaping. Give time for the high to hit.
But if you understand the potency, you can figure out something like, If I use a third of a cup of oil, each individual brownie's going to be 15 milligrams, and I don't want that. I want each of my brownies to be five milligrams, so I'm just going to make one third of that third be canna-oil, and the other two-thirds will be regular oil. You can actually use my online calculator to figure out how much oil to use based on the THC potency of the bud in order to make edibles with the potency you desire.

Andrea Drummer, Le Cordon Bleu graduate and owner of L.A.’s Elevation VIP, offers home cooks a chance to step up their cooking game by treating cannabis infusions like the culinary art that it truly is. In her cookbook, she explains the nuances of flavor profiles in specific strains and ways to pair them with food. For readers interested in elevating their dishes and bringing a touch of fine dining into kitchen, this cookbook will not only deepen your appreciation for an excellent dish, but also challenge you to improve your skills and techniques.
Take a small pot and add in your cannabis and Everclear. Keep the heat on medium low, at a simmer but never at a boil. This heat will burn off a lot of the alcohol, hopefully allowing you to drink this lemonade without getting hammered. The alcohol is in the recipe in order to extract the THC from the cannabis. After you have brought the cannabis and alcohol up to the right temp, add in half of the glass of water. The mixture should cook until about half of it is evaporated. Then, strain the mixture through cheese cloth to remove any leftover cannabis sediment. Be sure to squeeze the cheesecloth out to make sure that you get all of the trapped liquid. Then, you can add in the rest of the water, freshly squeezed lemon juice, and sugar as you see fit. Store this drink in the fridge! Enjoy!
Seven years ago, when Colorado and Washington became the first states to legalize recreational use, Danny Schaefer saw a business opportunity. Schaefer wasn’t interested in growing or distributing cannabis, but he knew visitors would flock to Colorado to openly participate in a drug culture long forced underground. So he founded My 420 Tours, which bills itself as “the original Colorado cannabis tour.” They offer all-inclusive vacations that include pot-friendly hotels, growhouse tours, cannabis massages and sushi and joint rolling classes.
Adding water is optional not mandatory. I would not reheat with water at this point. Stain the plant material off, if you haven’t already. If there is a lot of sediment in the bottom you can optionally reheat gently over low heat and further strain through a mesh yogurt strainer to further clarify it, but again it is optional. Will it taste too weedy? That is a personal preference but it should likely be OK, especially if you use it in highly seasoned foods that have lots of other flavors going on (a coconut curry perhaps?). Good luck.
“My parents were a great introduction to the rest of the world, basically,” says Sayegh, who hopes that finely prepared food combined with the capacity to discuss the molecular structure of cannabis will help strip away the stigma of a plant still federally classified alongside heroin as a Schedule I drug. Far from a scourge, Sayegh and others see immense medical and economic potential in the herb.
Cut the top 1/2 inch off the garlic heads. Add olive oil to the cut heads and sprinkle with basil. Roast in 420-degree oven for 30-50 minutes. The garlic is done when tender to a fork. Boil the cubed potatoes in salted water until fork tender, drain, and mash lightly. Add butters to potatoes and continue to mash. Add pepper, salt, cream, and cheese and mash until smooth. Squeeze garlic into the mix and whip until smooth.
 First smash the bananas in a large bowl and then add the eggs, sugar, canna-flour, salt, baking soda, and walnuts. Mix all the ingredients in together and pour mixture into your buttered baking tin. Put it in the oven and let it cook for an hour. Once it’s done you get to bite into chewy, nutty, banana bread that not only fills your stomach but gets you baked too! Enjoy Marijuana Banana Bread!!

4. Place 2 toasted muffin halves on each of 2 plates. Top each muffin half with a slice of Canadian bacon. Use a slotted spoon to carefully remove each egg from the pan, letting any excess water drip off before placing 1 poached egg on top of each muffin half. Spoon the hollandaise sauce over the 4 muffin halves. Garnish each egg with the parsley. Serve immediately.
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“It depends on if you’re in a state where you can legally access it, or if you’re in a prohibition state,” says McDonough. Most cookbooks and guides provide a way to evaluate the quality of your cannabis and give it a ballpark THC percentage, which will help the home cook calculate it. “It’s better than nothing, but it’s still not very precise,” she says.
Medical marijuana is used to treat a variety of issues including chronic pain, childhood epilepsy, and muscle control problems.[1] While consumption of cannabinoids is often accomplished by smoking, eating medical marijuana is typically the preferred method.[2] However, cooking marijuana is not as simple as throwing pot leaves into your brownie mix. You must first create marijuana infused ingredients. Cooking with medical marijuana is then as simple as substituting a marijuana infused ingredient for a regular one.
I strained my mix once and it worked fine. I then carefully funneled the strained tincture in to the dropper bottles. With this recipe, the mix should fill 11 bottles. I also hung on to the mason jar and stuck it in the fridge to scrape later. Throw away the stuff that’s left in the cheesecloth. That’s trash. But now, you should have a bunch of bottles full of delicious tincture. To ingest the medicine, put a dropper full under your tongue and swish it around your cheeks for about ten seconds. Some people require more than one dropper full. Take what you need and enjoy!
Taffy is one of the best candies that one could hope to have, especially in the summer. For some reason, it just reminds me of the beach and of barbecues and genuine good times. So I figured that with the approaching summer months, making some taffy might be a good idea! And, as always, you know that anything made in my kitchen absolutely has to be medicated! This recipe is super easy and simple so pretty much anyone can get it done!
Because alcohol extractions are typically used for tinctures, we will focus on fat based extractions for traditional edibles. For increased bioavailability, we suggest using coconut oil, which is high in medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). The reason being that MCTs are small, and easily digested relative to the long chain triglycerides (LCTs) found in most fatty foods (olive oil, canola oil or butter). Unlike other types of fats, MCTs don’t need to be broken down before they’re used for energy, and they don’t require any extra energy to digest or absorb. This makes the use of coconut oil especially helpful for those who suffer from impaired fat digestion and gallbladder issues. Note the MCT oil, which is comprised of 100% MCTs, can also be used.

Take a small pot and add in your cannabis and Everclear. Keep the heat on medium low, at a simmer but never at a boil. This heat will burn off a lot of the alcohol, hopefully allowing you to drink this lemonade without getting hammered. The alcohol is in the recipe in order to extract the THC from the cannabis. After you have brought the cannabis and alcohol up to the right temp, add in half of the glass of water. The mixture should cook until about half of it is evaporated. Then, strain the mixture through cheese cloth to remove any leftover cannabis sediment. Be sure to squeeze the cheesecloth out to make sure that you get all of the trapped liquid. Then, you can add in the rest of the water, freshly squeezed lemon juice, and sugar as you see fit. Store this drink in the fridge! Enjoy!


Similarly to preparing other recipes, it is rather important that you pay close attention to the measurements and weights that medical marijuana recipes require. If you are a beginner at preparing weed recipes, be sure to use no more than one ounce of premium quality marijuana per recipe. As you practice making these recipes and have discovered what potency of weed works best for you, you can up the amounts you use to cook.
With summer fast approaching, people are beginning to get prepared for backyard barbecues and trying to look killer in a bathing suit. So while we do understand that candies and confections make great edibles, not everyone wants to mow down on brownies right before beach season. But what if you want to be healthy and get stoned at the same time? Easy enough with this simple recipe for grilled peach cannabis salad. This dish will be perfect for a get together with friends or something to make and store for lunches throughout the week. The recipe comes from Roxanne Dennant at Fruit Slabs, a vegan fruit-leather that’s made for healthy people on the go. The salad, while spicy, remains sweet with the taste of summer.

The infamous weed brownie is infamous for a reason and incorporates two of the best things on the planet; brownies and weed. Brownies are a perfect baked good to share with friends and when you serve these they’ll be knocking down your door to get another taste of your bud brownies. Once you’ve whipped up a batch of these goodies, you might not be able to go back to regular box mix brownies again.
Cannabis Oil – Slow Cooker  Method (best choice): Add oil, marijuana plant material, and water to the slow cooker and cook on low for 4 to 8 hours.  I know some cooks who cook their oil for as much as 2 or 3 days in the slow cooker.  Feel free to do so if you choose.  It seems like overkill to me and after having tested longer cooking times, I found no improvement in quality or potency.  In fact, I noticed a stronger herbal flavor and not much else.  You can actually cook for less time, just make sure your mixture has time to come to a full simmer.

Robyn Griggs Lawrence cares about your well-being. As a former editor of Natural Home magazine, she wrote a number of books on healthy living before making her foray into the culinary cannabis world. Her “Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook,” which has a foreword written by Women Grow co-founder Jane West, gathers wholesome recipes and tips from chefs across the country on making edibles that are vegan, vegetarian, raw and gluten-free. The book includes cameos from Scott Durrah, a co-found of Denver cannabis cooking company Simply Pure, and Catjia Redfern, co-founder of MegaMints, among others.


It depends on the strength of the kief and the tolerance of the person consuming it. Everyone responds drastically differently to cannabis, especially edible cannabis. While 10 mgs THC (the maximum per serving dose allowed in commercial edibles in many states) will be too much for some people, 100 mgs will not be enough for others. If you look at recipes for kief they recommend anywhere from 1/16 of a gram up to a gram (although in most cases that will be way too strong). This why I ever dosing extensively in my online cooking course and even a dosage calculator tool in my free online dosing class (find both at http://www.Cannademy.com ). Dosing is also covered extensively in my new book The Easy Cannabis Cookbook (http://bit.ly/EasyCannabisCookbook) and in less detail on this website (but the basics are also here) in the Marijuana Cooking Tutorials section under the Cooking Basics tab.

I am not confusing anything and you can choose to “take offense” all you like, but the FACT is MOST people do not like the taste of weed in their food. I get emails from people every day and talk to the public about this day in and day out at my classes, and most people cite flavor as one of the big reasons they do not like edibles. If you like the taste, have a party, nobody is stopping you, it is very easy to make medibles that taste like weed. But this is NOT the effect most people are going for. You can get plenty of medicinal effects without tasting a prominent flavor of cannabis, and your personal preferences aside, this is what the majority of cannabis cooks are looking for.
Place peanut butter, canna butter and salt in a large microwaveable bowl and melt in microwave until completely melted, about 2 minutes if using reg peanut butter. If using natural, it will liquify faster. Stir in the vanilla and powdered sugar ( I use a mixer and whip it up for a couple minutes making it lighter). Spread the fudge into the prepared pan, smoothing the top with an offset spatula or spoon. Cover and place in the fridge until cool.

Alice B. Toklas, who presided over literary salons in early twentieth-century Paris with partner Gertrude Stein, firmly ensconced the practice of cooking and eating cannabis in the cultural imagination with The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book. First published in 1954, it offered up a recipe for Hashish Fudge, which “anyone could whip up on a rainy day.” In addition to pulverizing a “bunch of cannabis sativa,” the recipe calls for black peppercorns, dried figs, and peanuts. In an introduction to the 1984 reprint of the book, food writer M.F.K. Fisher wrote that she had never tried one of the fudge brownies, but “am told they taste slightly bitter.” These days, no cannabis chef worth their herb would recommend throwing raw product into baked goods, but brownies can be an ideal vehicle for THC. It just takes a few more steps than Toklas imagined.
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