That evening’s festivities were business, of a kind. Dope, a “cannabis lifestyle” magazine, was hosting its annual Oregon Dope Cup in Portland. The event is one of many that aspire to be the Oscars of the legal-cannabis industry. Laurie & MaryJane had won a Best Edible trophy at the previous Dope Cup, in Seattle, for its savory nuts. Last year, the company agreed to host an edibles dinner for the magazine’s guests, including the cup’s judges, who had flown in from Colorado.
“There are two different compounds in cannabis. One is THC, that’s the psychoactive cannabinoid that gets you high,” Jeff says. “But the lesser-known ‘little brother’ of THC is CBD, and that is a non-psychoactive medicinal compound in cannabis. And that’s what people use to treat seizures, and scientific studies are starting to show that it kills cancer cells and shrinks tumors.”
Squeeze and pat dry your thawed wings until you have them as dry as you can get them. Combine all of your dry ingredients (salt, garlic powder, cayenne pepper, onion powder, paprika, pepper, and flour) into a gallon sized sealable plastic bag. Once you have all the dry ingredients mixed in your plastic sealable bag add your wings, seal the bags, and toss until the wings are evenly coated with your flour mixture. Now place your coated wings on a cookie sheet, cover with plastic wrap or aluminum foil and refrigerate for a minimum of one hour. This step can be done the night before which is awesome!
Wolf’s mixed nuts have had a lot of traction. She adapted them from a Danny Meyer recipe and added infused coconut oil, a staple in her kitchen because it can also be used topically, “so you’re getting more bang for your buck.” (An elderly friend of Wolf’s rubs it on his hands to treat his rheumatoid arthritis.) Wolf’s newest book, “Cooking with Cannabis,” emphasizes comfort foods like mac and cheese and meatloaf. There’s a chapter called “Recipes for One,” intended for solo eaters. “It’s great to be able to make yourself ramen,” she said. (The cannabis goes in the broth, mixed with sesame oil.)
So your oven should be preheating. Sift together the baking soda, salt, flour, and baking powder. Set these items aside. In a different bowl, use an electric mixer to beat the butter for about 45 seconds. Add in your lavender flowers and sugar in a consistent stream. Be sure to pause and scrape the side of the bowl to make sure that everything is getting mixed in. Beat everything together on medium power until the substance is fluffy and light. Then, keeping the mixer on medium speed, add in the eggs, beating steadily until everything is combined.
Cannabis Now contributor Laurie Wolf sells small batch cheese crisps and brownie bites at Oregon dispensaries. But if you’re not in the state, her cookbook will help you replicate those treats — and tons of others — at home. With elevated recipes for dishes like a tomahawk ribeye and bruschetta with ricotta and peas, this is the book you should turn to if you’re prepping an elegant dinner party. In fact, “Herb” has been called the “the authoritative volume on how to cook with cannabis” by celebrity chef Michael Ruhlman — who won a James Beard Award for his own book — so you know it’s good.

The first step is to decarboxylate your flower. Ideally, do not grind it but rather break it up into popcorn sized nugs, but it is fine to use shake or ground bud as well. Throw your cannabis right in your decarboxylator (putting it in silicon or a shot glass if you’re using kief/concentrates) and let it run its cycle while you gather your ingredients.


Now that we’ve gone over cannabis-infused oils, let’s dive into their similarly monikered cousin: cannabis oil. Similar to olive, vegetable, or coconut oil, cannabis oil is made through a chemical extraction process. There are a variety of methods that the marijuana industry uses to extract oil, resulting in similar but unique products. Most cannabis extraction methods involve a solvent, like butane or CO2—or extreme heat and pressure—to extract the cannabinoids. These processes can be time-consuming and usually involve expensive laboratory equipment. Without proper training and the right tools, extracting THC from weed using certain methods is downright dangerous. Unless you’re using a solventless method, the excess yield—or product that isn’t cannabis oil—needs to be removed in order for a clean, non-toxic final result. For those of us who aren’t chemistry experts, most methods of this process should be left to the professionals.
Strain the oil.[5] Do this while the oil is still hot for best results. You can strain the oil using a wire strainer to remove the larger pieces of marijuana. If you still have solids you want to get rid of, strain a second time through a coffee strainer. This will take a lot of time so be careful and patient. You may want to do small batches while you continue to simmer the mixture.
Alice B. Toklas, who presided over literary salons in early twentieth-century Paris with partner Gertrude Stein, firmly ensconced the practice of cooking and eating cannabis in the cultural imagination with The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book. First published in 1954, it offered up a recipe for Hashish Fudge, which “anyone could whip up on a rainy day.” In addition to pulverizing a “bunch of cannabis sativa,” the recipe calls for black peppercorns, dried figs, and peanuts. In an introduction to the 1984 reprint of the book, food writer M.F.K. Fisher wrote that she had never tried one of the fudge brownies, but “am told they taste slightly bitter.” These days, no cannabis chef worth their herb would recommend throwing raw product into baked goods, but brownies can be an ideal vehicle for THC. It just takes a few more steps than Toklas imagined.

As Hukill demonstrated how to make the perfect pot brownie Saturday afternoon, Basil leaned forward in his seat and asked if cannabis could be infused into foods other than desserts. Before Hukill could answer, other attendees – many of them Portland residents who have played with cannabis in their own kitchens – piped up. Toss Brussels sprouts in cannabis-infused butter, one suggested. Find an online recipe for cannabis-infused simple syrup, said another, and have fun mixing cocktails.
Once your wings have been chilling in the fridge and you’re ready to bake them preheat your oven to *425 degrees. Lightly grease a cookie sheet with olive oil or cooking spray and set aside.  Melt a ½ cup of cannabis butter on low heat. Once your cannabis butter is melted turn heat off and whisk in ½ cup of hot sauce. Separate your hot sauce and cannabis butter mixture equally into 2 separate small bowls and set aside.
An important step, decarboxylation, will maximize the THC content of the plant material you use to make concentrated oil. Catalano recommends  baking plant material at 220 degrees for 25 minutes. “Everyone has a different time and temperature for their methods. I prefer that time to preserve terpenes during second processes after the butter is made such as baking,” she says.  BHO can also be decarbed after it has been made by putting the BHO into an oven-safe, parchment paper-lined Pyrex dish and heating it at the same temperature for the same time.
In respect to the upcoming holidays, there’s probably going to be a lot of parties coming up. What goes better with the holidays than gingerbread? And you can’t forget to stay medicated. Everyone gets a little stressed during these festive months, right? This way, you can seem like you’ve got some holiday cheer, when in reality, you’re getting super stoned.

Hi This is one of my fave articles so far on cooking. I am just about to try all this the first time. I have a very pretty plant I grew and she is ready to start drying. Can I take a small amount of the bud after a couple of days of drying and decarb it before its all the way dried and cured and use it? Thanks again for answering the questions. I was able to read through and other people asked the same things I would.


Disclaimer: This is not intended as medical advice. I’m not a doctor. I’m also not a lawyer and can’t defend you if you get busted trying to make this recipe in a state that still considers possession or cultivation of cannabis a criminal act. I don’t agree with this law, but I’d never advocate that you break it. Jail would suck. Instead, I strongly advise that you work to change the law in your state or nation by supporting and being active in grassroots organizations that are trying to legalize cannabis in your area (they’re everywhere). This recipe is heretoforth only intended for people who live in states or countries where medical or recreational use of cannabis is legal, who are 21 and older, of sound mind and who understand that operating heavy machinery (cars, trucks, planes, etc.) under the influence of any intoxicant, including marijuana, is incredibly dangerous, immature, and wholly stupid. Please don’t ever eat and drive. Support public transportation or use the two legs that evolution gave you and walk your sweet ass wherever it is that you need to go.
Conceptually, the process of making edibles is very similar to that of cannabis concentrates; the goal being a pure, therapeutic combination of cannabinoids and terpenes. The primary difference is that edibles typically utilize a food-grade solvent like coconut oil (or another fatty substance) as opposed to a hydrocarbon like butane to extract the cannabinoids from the starting material. There are literally hundreds of ways to make edibles, and most of them will ‘work’ to some degree. However, what really makes this recipe so effective is the increased bioavailability of the cannabinoids – in essence, how easy it is for your body to absorb the THC, CBD and other beneficial compounds.
Amazed and thankful you’ve been answering this thread for over a year. I’ve made a few batches of butter in my day and have never decarbed in the oven. Super potent butter achieved but always in the slowcooker or double boiler for around 12 hours stirring every 30 min or so. Clearly this is a time consuming process leading me to making batches only once or 12 a year if that. A friend of mine brought over a batch of cookies she said took her about 1:45 total with the decarb process that were damn good and almost as potent as mine using same quality/amounts of green. I’m baking cookies this week and I want to try decarbing but I’m worried about letting go of my tried and true method. Would decarbing at 215 and infusing in the slow cooker for 8 hours be ok or overkill? I’d love to get better results or the same with less prep time.
In 2007, Child folded. The Wolfs decided to move to Oregon, seeking a change of pace. Laurie busied herself with a cookbook, “Portland, Oregon Chef’s Table,” for which she gathered recipes from local chefs. One day, when she was getting her car repaired, she struck up a conversation with a man in the service-station waiting room. “He stuck out his hand and said, ‘I’m Dr. Phil. Not that Dr. Phil. I’m a pot doctor.’ ” Medical marijuana had been legal in Oregon since 1998, and the doctor, Phil Leveque, was one of the state’s first practitioners. Wolf told him about her epilepsy and problems with Tegretol. “He told me, ‘Get off that stuff. It’s poison.’ ” Leveque wrote her a prescription for medical cannabis and instructed her to consume a small amount each morning. She found that it not only controlled her seizures but also stopped the “auras”—feelings of dizziness she’d continued to have on the anti-convulsant. She stopped taking Tegretol, and she hasn’t had a seizure since. “I don’t know if I can say I’m cured, but my symptoms are completely managed,” Wolf said.

 In a bowl, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and oatmeal, mix well. Grab another bowl and beat eggs, salt, and vanilla. In another large bowl add the canna-butter, oil, and both sugars. Add in the egg mix until creamy and smooth. Then pour in the flour mix and stir everything in together. Now add in the raisins and mix once more.


 In a large saucepan combine the sugar, corn syrup, salt, and water and cook on medium heat bringing it to a boil. Make sure you rememeber to stir frequently so nothing burns. After all the sugar is dissolved it’s time to mix in your peanuts. Be sure to check your handy dandy thermometer and cook until the temperature reaches 300 degrees. Remove from heat and immediately mix in canna-butter the star of the show, and baking soda. Then put the entire mixture onto the cookie sheet.
I love the taste of smoked or vaped cannabis. I do not like the taste of it in my food. Most people do not, but I know a handful of folks who do. But from a culinary/flavor profile/foodie perspective, most often the flavor of cannabis does not enhance most recipes. Your taking offense to this is the equivalent of getting mad at someone because they don’t like the flavor of broccoli, or beer, or whatever. It’s just silly. If you like it, more power to you, cannabis cooking is a whole lot easier for you. But most of my readers do not like a strong cannabis flavor in their food and neither do I.
I say hopefully because lecithin will makes fats bind to the water, which is not what you want in this instance. I never use lecithin when making ordinary infused butter, I don’t see a reason. (more on lecithin here — https://www.cannabischeri.com/food/cooking-basics/lecithin-in-cannabis-cooking/ ) So this is my best guess of how to save it. Without the lecithin in the mix it would be no problem, but not sure how this will affect it. Please let us know!
If you have the luxury of being able to obtain your medicine from a legal dispensary near you, you may have noticed the large selection of edibles that are beginning to overflow the shelves. These pre-made, pre-packaged cannabis infused treats are more accessible to patients nowadays than ever before, but unfortunately many edibles still come packed with sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and other unhealthy ingredients. While these processed food delights can be an easy way to get medicated on the go, many medical marijuana patients prefer making their own medicated snacks and infused meals — and for good reason. Join us as we explore all of the popular cannabis cooking techniques and become a master chef in no time!
 Make sure the pan you plan to use is nice and hot before you start adding batter. You can use 1/3 to 1/2 of a cup to determine how much should be poured into the pan. When your pan is hot enough, begin pouring in the batter and be ready to flip it when you see bubbles popping up throughout the batter. For even more simplicity, pour the batter into a waffle maker. Now all that’s left to do is grab the syrup and enjoy the most important meal of the day while cheesing from ear to ear, Marijuana Waffles!
So yeah, testing this hash butter made me melt into the floor and feel like I just wasn’t going to make it to see another day. Let my mistake stand as a reminder that you really need to be conscious of dosing your edibles. Even an experienced edibles writer sometimes gets hungry and eats half of a grilled cheese without calculating dosage first and spends half of her afternoon asking the farmer to remind her that she’s not, in fact, dying.
The recipes on this site are calculated on using a 1/2 ounce to 1 cup butter, which in most cases will be pretty strong (depending on the strength of the cannabis of course). When cooking for myself, I will often double that. Also making stronger infusions let’s you use less of them to get the same dose, which can improve flavor. So amounts are a suggestion and cannabis cooks should always take the amounts given in ANY recipe with a grain of salt and adjust upwards or downwards according to their own needs. My free dosing class can help you do that.
This can add a nice flavor and depth to some recipes, while in others it just plain tastes bad. Baked takes this into account and shows you how to make cannabis infused baked goods that taste great and look great too. There are over 60 recipes including Baked Fudge, Marshmallow Meltdown and Coco Nutty Lime Cookies, and even gluten free recipes for anyone with gluten sensitivites.
There’s so many stoners that love to wake and bake. The only thing that can be added to an awesome morning smoke session to make it better is coffee. Stoners love their coffee. What happens if you’re rushing though and you have to make a choice? Not anymore. Following this short recipe will provide you with the most delicious medicated coffee drink for those busy days!

It depends on the strength of the kief and the tolerance of the person consuming it. Everyone responds drastically differently to cannabis, especially edible cannabis. While 10 mgs THC (the maximum per serving dose allowed in commercial edibles in many states) will be too much for some people, 100 mgs will not be enough for others. If you look at recipes for kief they recommend anywhere from 1/16 of a gram up to a gram (although in most cases that will be way too strong). This why I ever dosing extensively in my online cooking course and even a dosage calculator tool in my free online dosing class (find both at http://www.Cannademy.com ). Dosing is also covered extensively in my new book The Easy Cannabis Cookbook (http://bit.ly/EasyCannabisCookbook) and in less detail on this website (but the basics are also here) in the Marijuana Cooking Tutorials section under the Cooking Basics tab.

You also need to understand the quantity and how to deal with it when making edibles. For example, let's say you're doing a simple boxed brownie recipe that calls for a third of a cup of oil. A quick fix would be just replacing that with a third of a cup of canna-oil. However, if you do that and you don't understand the potency of that oil, you can't say how many milligrams of THC are in each brownie—you might actually overmedicate that brownie.
I used to be a biter, but my mom cured me of that. Joking aside, I like the taste of weed butter, and I like the taste of food, but the two don’t work for me. I don’t eat sugar or flour, and anything else I cook isn’t going to be enhanced by the taste of weed. And if you make sweets, you can’t eat anymore when you’re high or you’ll make yourself miserable. Why not just eat the butter, then you can eat as many sweets as you like, and just get fat instead of insanely loaded?
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