“I would say I’m a ten,” Wolf said. She’s had only one edibles disaster. Four years ago, in her rookie phase, she and a friend consumed too much cannabis before a Halloween party. She ended up accosting a partygoer who was dressed as a doctor and asking about a bunch of medical issues. “It was absolutely mortifying,” she said. “I forgot it was a costume party.” She has also had complications with LSD, which she told us about at the table. “Once, when I was tripping, I ate a cinnamon candle,” she said. She thought it was cinnamon toast.
I strained my mix once and it worked fine. I then carefully funneled the strained tincture in to the dropper bottles. With this recipe, the mix should fill 11 bottles. I also hung on to the mason jar and stuck it in the fridge to scrape later. Throw away the stuff that’s left in the cheesecloth. That’s trash. But now, you should have a bunch of bottles full of delicious tincture. To ingest the medicine, put a dropper full under your tongue and swish it around your cheeks for about ten seconds. Some people require more than one dropper full. Take what you need and enjoy!
Anytime. Glycerin is tougher than alcohol to get a strong tincture as it is just not as efficient as extracting. I am going to be working on glycerin tincture instructions to update my cooking course after we launch the new topicals course. Depending on your needs and tolerance level, you may do fine, just be aware it likely won’t be as strong as the same tincture made with alcohol.
While historians have found recipes involving weed dating back to 15th century Europe and even 10th century India, pot brownies were introduced to pop (or should we say “pot”?) culture in the 1968 movie “I Love You Alice B. Toklas.” Objectively, the most common way to make weed-laced snacks is marijuana butter, but baking with cannabis oil can be even more effective. While these two products have many similar uses and come from the same plant, they’re produced and used in very different ways.

Wolf pulled a Mason jar of infused olive oil from a shelf and encouraged me to smell it. It had a powerfully green scent. “Olive oil infuses beautifully,” she said. “It’s very earthy.” A jar of infused canola oil, on the other hand, smelled like bong water. Wolf had used the infused olive oil to make the stuffed mushrooms as well as a spinach tart. Those who wanted even more weed could slather their food with an infused feta sauce made with olive oil, garlic, parsley, and red onion. “Strong flavors help conceal the taste,” Wolf said. “It is a challenge to keep the foods from tasting like cannabis. That’s probably the hardest thing about making edibles.” Dessert was a “mildly infused” strawberry trifle in a big glass bowl. For palate cleansers, there were frozen grapes—an old standby for Wolf. “They’re wonderful when people get stoned,” she explained.
This book, based on the Munchies and Viceland television series “Bong Appétit,” was published in October by Ten Speed Press. (This is in itself notable, as Ten Speed is one of the best cookbook publishers around, and continues the legitimate trajectory of the cannabis cooking genre.) The book has a comprehensive introduction that includes topics such as dosing, techniques, methods of decarboxylation and infusion, cannabis pairing tips, questions to ask your dispensary, tips on equipment and more. The recipes are sourced from the Munchies test kitchen and from many well-known chefs, whose recipes are recalibrated to add cannabis. Thus: Korean fried chicken from Deuki Hong of San Francisco’s Sunday Bird; fried soft-shell crab with shishito pepper mole from Daniela Soto-Innes of Cosme and Atla; and (my favorite) Joan Nathan’s preserved lemons. The Munchies test kitchen also has some fun ones, including herb focaccia with, well, herb; and confit octopus, in which a whole octopus is poached in cannabis-infused olive oil. If that sounds too aspirational, there are instructions for making an apple bong — a hollowed-out apple filled with weed-infused mezcal — at the end of the drinks chapter.
Cannabis Cheri cannabis cooking mistakes cannabis cooking troubleshooting cannabis dosing cannabis oil cannabutter Cheri Sicard cooking with hash cooking with kief decarbing decarboxylate decarboxylating decarboxylation hash kief marijuana butter marijuana cooking marijuana cooking mistakes marijuana cooking temperatures marijuana cooking trouble shooting marijuana oil
There is no “high” from CBD, although both THC and CBD have many medicinal properties. When you make a butter or oil infusion you are infusing both these cannabinoids (along with many others) into the butter or oil, so yes you would get the benefits of both. How much of each will depend on the plant material you are cooking with and its individual cannabinoid profile. This varies widely from strain to strain. If you are using lab tested cannabis you will have a good idea of what to expect. While you can estimate a THC percentage (my free dosing course teaches you how), CBD is impossible to estimate without a lab test. Not only is the amount of CBD in each strain drastically different, you don’t physically feel the effects of CBD in the same way you do THC. Hope this all makes sense. Cheri
I’m also a bit worried about the decarb process. I have an oldish gas oven that is very inconsistent in temperature, it’s impossible to bake a cake in it due to temp fluctuations and areas that get hotter than others. This doesn’t seem like a wise move for decarboxylation as I’ve read that temperature fluctuations can lead to an inconsistent/low THC content?
Marijuana cooking with concentrates, namely kief and hash, opens up a whole new world of recipes that can be converted to cannabis cooking.  A lot of these recipes contain far less fat than ones that depend on butter or oil to carry the medication, an important consideration for those trying to curb calories or limit fats. Of course cannabis metabolizes better with some fat, but when you cook with concentrates, you eliminate the need to add extra oil or butter to achieve a proper dose.
Nobody can deny that the combination of kush and OJ is the perfect way to start your day. Not everyone is a coffee drinker, after all. Plus, orange juice is better for you anyway. The following recipe will allow you to create an awesome orange drink that you can bring with you on a hot day as a nice medicated smoothie or you can drink it with your bowl of cereal as an awesome wake and bake. Whatever you choose to do, this drink is absolutely amazing… And medicated.
Disclosure: Some of the links above are affiliate links, meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase. We are a professional review site that may receive compensation from certain companies whose products we review. We test each product thoroughly and give high marks to only the very best. We are independently owned and the opinions expressed here are our own.

Mary Poppins wasn’t just blowing smoke when she sang, “Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.” There’s proof lining the shelves of dispensaries across the country, and the choices in infused edibles have never been better. But for some patients, it’s more complicated than choosing between Dr. Robert’s Chocolate Trip Cookie and Compassion Edibles’ Traditional French Chocolate Tainted Truffles. People with special dietary …


Here is another cookbook focusing on sweet confections laced with cannabis, but this time taking a more high-end approach. Sweet Mary Jane was written by Karin Lazarus owner of Sweet Mary Jane bakery in boulder, Colorado. Sweet Mary Jane is one of the first legal cannabis themed bakeries in the united States, and focuses on making the highest quality and best tasking baked treats with medicinal cannabis doses in each bite.

When making your own edibles using dried flower, you first have to grind the cannabis flowers and bake them. If you’re making your own canna oil or butter, the recipe always starts with cooking the dried flower in the oven before it can be steeped in the oil. This heating process—whether it happens through a portable vaporizer or your kitchen’s oven—is called decarboxylation. In addition, accessory products like the LEVO and the Magical Butter Maker can help simplify the process.
When your cannaoil or cannabutter is done infusing, remove any plant matter by carefully straining it through cheesecloth (available in the cooking section of stores like Target or Walmart) or a coffee filter. Pour your infusion into a container and you’re done! Be sure to put your cannabutter in the fridge to harden, but cannaoils are fine to store on the counter. The most important thing is to keep it in an airtight container (mason jars work great) in a cool, dark space.
I have been a few batches of High THC cookies when I started making “vegan” cookies for a few friends.Simply put.I used clarified unsalted butter.Well with little extra moisture,I burnt the bottoms of the 1st batch.So I figured.I would try 1,It fucked me up,But tated burnt.The next batch.I said fuck it & cooked them for less time.BIG DIFFERENCE..In cookies,hey will reach the 350 F temp & you will start burning off your THC.BUT in Brownies,which are thicker & moister,the inside doesn’t reach 350 F,so you don’t burn any THC off…When I’m ready to make cookie ONLY ,I decarb my bud at 240 for 20-30 minutes in a Pyrex (name brand- I use a glass pie pan).COVER with foil.Check at 25mins.Then ever 5 minutes.Do not go over 45 mins.Leave to cool COVERED in the glass pan.THUS when cooking,the bud will finish decarbing.FOR ANYTHING ELSE THRN COOKIES….ITS 240 FOR 30-40 MINS,,CHECKING AT 30 MINUTES,45 TOPS .after 45 minutes,you’re burning it off.Beening doing this this was for over 30yrs.
Take the cannabis, lime juice, water, green onion, and the oil and place it in the crock pot. Cook the materials on low for about two hours. Once two hours has gone by, place the apple cider vinegar, soy sauce, tomato paste, chili powder, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, honey, ground ginger, cayenne pepper, and the apricot nectar in to the crockpot with the previously cooked mixture. Mix everything together well and cook on low for another hour at least. Be sure to stir the mixture occasionally. Once the sauce is done cooking, store it in an airtight container in the fridge. The recipe will yield about two cups of sauce and is definitely perfect for your backyard barbecues! Enjoy!
 Make sure the pan you plan to use is nice and hot before you start adding batter. You can use 1/3 to 1/2 of a cup to determine how much should be poured into the pan. When your pan is hot enough, begin pouring in the batter and be ready to flip it when you see bubbles popping up throughout the batter. For even more simplicity, pour the batter into a waffle maker. Now all that’s left to do is grab the syrup and enjoy the most important meal of the day while cheesing from ear to ear, Marijuana Waffles!
Take Viceland’s Bong Appétit, by far the biggest hit of the genre. Last year, it was nominated for a James Beard award, a top honor in the cooking world. The first two seasons featured dreamy sequences about sourcing local ingredients, bite-sized lessons in how to infuse various fats and oils with marijuana and, at the end of each episode, a giggle-ridden dinner party populated by the kind of chill stoners who would never judge you for being too high. (I found this out when I appeared on an episode that aired last summer.)
Decarbing…. it sounds like your oven is not going to cut it for that. The slow cooker, unfortunately, does not get hot enough to properly do the job. I even tried under pressure in my Instant Pot and it only worked so-so. I don’t imagine you have a sous vide machine, most people don’t, but if you did this would work. It is basically a boil in bag but very temperature controlled. The other solution is a bit pricey, but I do like the Ardent decarboxylator as it takes away all the guesswork and gives perfect results every time (enter the coupon code CANNACHERI and $30 bucks off, thanks to the reader who asked for a discount code cause the company gave me one http://bit.ly/cheri-ardent). You can read my review of this gadget at https://www.cannabischeri.com/lifestyle/reviews/cannabis-product-reviews-ardent-decarboxylator-nova/ .
Hi, I used 15g of quality stuff here in Hawaii, 2 cups coconut organic oil and 2 tablespoons of litchen granules. Spelled in wrong. Anyways I decarb in the oven for 30 min at 240, put everything in crock pot on a low for most the day and keep warm for some sitting occasionally. I cooked for 10 hours strained and chilled. Used it later that the next day in brownies and cookies adding 1/2 cup to a gluten free brownie mix, and and 3/4 cup to chocolate cookies. I ate two cookies. It only felt a little bit but I was high all day. Should this be enough for decent edibles or will I have to eat a lot?
“What decarbing does is it actually activates the THC or CBD,” Jeff explains. “Decarbing is done through heat and time. When you’re smoking weed, when you light it, the combustion automatically decarbs it, and you’re smoking THC. But when you’re cooking, if you don’t decarb it, you’re cooking with something called THCA. And that A molecule is basically blocking the THC from coming off the leaf into the butter or oil.”
While summer is over and most people are trying to drink the warmest drinks that they can get their hands on. However, there are some that like to drink lemonade no matter what time of the year it is, warm or cold! This recipe is a great one for cannabis lemonade, using Everclear. Most of the alcohol should be burned off in the extracting process and you can extend the time slightly to make sure that you’ve burned off all of the alcohol.
Marijuana butter and cannabis-infused oil can be ingested in a variety of ways. Once you’ve created the product, it can be used as a cooking ingredient for any recipe—minding that most baked goods work best with butter. However, one thing to consider is the temperature of the dish you’re preparing—heating the marijuana butter or oil to temperatures exceeding 245 degrees Fahrenheit will burn the THC. For a more simple application, the butter can be used as a spread on toast or even just dosed orally by itself. Some choose cannabis-infused oil as a medicinal ingredient in topical salves, lotions, and ointment, as it can be absorbed through the skin once it has gone through the decarboxylation process.
If you prefer to use butter next time instead of oil, the preparation is virtually identical, but you’ll want to start out with a single stick of salted butter and you’ll want to simmer it between 8 to 24 hours if using the slow cook method. Use about a quarter to a half ounce of weed per stick of butter. Butters can be great because it can be more versatile than cooking with oil. You can even add butter to your toast!
Oatmeal cookies provide such a hearty bite that it’s hard not to fall in love with them, especially when you’ve got oats and raisins falling out of your mouth. Raisins and oats are both good for your health and so is cannabis. So it’s only right that they join forces to produce this super cookie. So if you love eating, and you love Mary Jane it’s time to start cooking!
According to the Arcview Group, a market-research firm, the legal-marijuana business in Canada and the United States did almost seven billion dollars in sales last year. Arcview estimates that the industry will grow to more than twenty-two billion dollars by 2020. These profits have brought innovation. Cannabis can now be vaporized, absorbed under the tongue, or smoked in a hyper-concentrated form, a process known as dabbing. Edibles—a category that used to begin and end with the bone-dry pot brownie, served in a college dorm room—have been undergoing a particularly marked revolution. The finer dispensaries in Boulder now sell cannabis-infused candy, breath sprays, spritzers, and savory foods, from bacon to smoked salmon. In Los Angeles, thrill-seekers are paying as much as five hundred dollars a head to have a cannabis chef cater multicourse meals, pairing different cannabis strains with their culinary complements (heirloom-tomato bisque infused with a lemony Sour Diesel, for example).
All cannabis oil packaging must also state the percentage of THC and CBD in the oil (so you know how potent and psychotropic it is before you use it). Just like strains of dried cannabis, oils can have stronger concentrations of CBD, THC, or be more balanced, and thus create very different experiences. Not all oils are created equal – so reading the packaging is crucial for your first time. 
Many people know to decarboxylate cannabis in the oven first, but it’s worth noting here for anyone who doesn’t know or doesn’t see the point in doing so. You can skip this step and add your raw cannabis to the slow cooker to decarb in the oil, but you might find that this longer oil soak simply worsens the taste of your cannabis oil. It’s also more difficult to control the temperature in a slow cooker and you risk burning off essential cannabinoids, but in an oven, you can set the temperature low and keep it steady.
×