Disclaimer: This is not intended as medical advice. I’m not a doctor. I’m also not a lawyer and can’t defend you if you get busted trying to make this recipe in a state that still considers possession or cultivation of cannabis a criminal act. I don’t agree with this law, but I’d never advocate that you break it. Jail would suck. Instead, I strongly advise that you work to change the law in your state or nation by supporting and being active in grassroots organizations that are trying to legalize cannabis in your area (they’re everywhere). This recipe is heretoforth only intended for people who live in states or countries where medical or recreational use of cannabis is legal, who are 21 and older, of sound mind and who understand that operating heavy machinery (cars, trucks, planes, etc.) under the influence of any intoxicant, including marijuana, is incredibly dangerous, immature, and wholly stupid. Please don’t ever eat and drive. Support public transportation or use the two legs that evolution gave you and walk your sweet ass wherever it is that you need to go.
After 24 hours, turn the crockpot off. Let it sit for a while and cool off. I waited about 20 minutes. When the glycerin has cooled, put on your gloves and put the cheesecloth over the mouth of the mason jar. I took the circle part of the jar and screwed it back on over the cloth to keep in in place. I also folded the cloth over itself about four or five times to ensure that I strained out all of the leftover marijuana powder.
First things first: depending on the product you’ve purchased, you’ll be able to see THC-A and/or THC levels of your concentrate on the package label. Most concentrates aren’t decarboxylated (heat activated), and will have a very high THC-A and a low THC labeling . THC-A turns into THC when in contact with heat for a certain amount of time. THC-A loses approximately 13% of its mass when decarboxylated. After you’ve calculated how much of your THC-A corresponds to THC, you would additionally add the small THC amount in the label of your product. Please make sure to calculate your THC correctly. Below is a formula for calculating your total and final THC levels.

Hey i just tried the oil in the crockpot method, turned out to what seems like good oil ( have done stove top in past) i tried two teaspoons in a small amount of water for a potency test but havent had any real results ( used about 2 1/2 cups of trimmings and small buds to 1 cup oil) im just curious is that possible to the way ive ingested it? Would baking into something and trying that be a better “strength” test? Thanks!

SInce I have no t lab tested after using the Ardent Lyft, I can’t say for sure how well it works, but mine seems to work fine. It does take longer than what I typically do in the oven, but it seems to work. I have no idea what the tcheck device is, but I do know that home testing is wildly inaccurate (so much so as to be useless), so don’t know as you should much stock in the 0% cause that does not seem right. I use trim all the time, it’s great economical cooking material. Using trim should not be an issue at all. The slow cooker, with water added, is my personal favorite way of infusing oil or butter. Hope this helps.
That’s right. Cinnamon cannabis oatmeal cookies. Oatmeal isn’t the most popular flavor of cookies but cinnamon roll is something that most people agree is amazing. On a scale of 1 to 10, this recipe comes in at about a 3 for difficulty, meaning that pretty much anyone is capable of accomplishing the task of making these. They’ll also get you pretty stoned, an added bonus. These will do well at a party or a gift for a friend and they’re the perfect recipe to begin your cannabis culinary adventure. Whatever you choose to do with them, you’ll love the way they taste!
First, add in the flour, baking soda, and spices. Sift them together well. Take a mixer and beat the butter and sugar together until fluffy. Use something electric for this so you don’t hurt yourself. Add in the eggs and the molasses after that. Slowly add in the flour and separate the dough three times. Wrap each one in plastic wrap and put in the fridge for an hour.

Hi my question is different but j hope you can answer it. I have a slow cooker that I let someone borrow to make butter in. It has been washed. Is it ok to use to cook my regular family meals and potluck foods without worry of left over residue interfering. I would hate to bring something to a potluck or my young children and they have marijuana in it.


Dosing remains highly individualized and varies according to your symptoms and strength of the cannabis strain being used. As a general rule, try and maintain easily understood ratios between amounts of cannabis and butter or oil being infused. If your infused oil or butter is particularly strong, consider using only half infused and half non-infused, or whichever ratio works best for your specific needs. It’s incredibly important to keep your edibles out of reach of children or anyone else in your household who should not be using them. Make sure your edibles are properly marked and stashed safely away.
The daughter of legendary singer and songwriter, Bob Marley, penned this compilation of recipes that fits right in with Marley Natural’s clean, green, holistic lifestyle brand. It gives readers the chance to try their hands at making some of her family’s favorite (mostly vegetarian) Jamaican recipes. Intimate stories of her life growing up on the island, insight into how she includes cannabis in her personal wellness routine, and directions for infused beauty treatments accompany this robust collection of recipes.
Cannabis infused butter, otherwise known as cannabutter, is a primary ingredient in many marijuana-infused recipes. Cannabis butter is technically an ‘extraction’ method whereby the cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are extracted from the cannabis plant and infused into the butter fats. The butter from a normal recipe is then substituted with cannabutter to produce psychoactive effects. Cannabis butter is often used in decadent edible recipes (such as brownies), but ultimately its use depends on the cook and his/her personal preferences and/or their dietary needs. It can be made from dried or decarboxylated cannabis buds, trim, solvent-less hash or even sugar leaf.
How do you grind your weed? You can use a quality cannabis grinder which you can buy at our store. You can use a food processor or a coffee grinder, although you’d probably want to designate a processor or coffee grinder specifically for that use (unless you don’t mind leaving a little residual flavor, which could be a good thing if you like your morning cup of Joe to taste like Bubba Kush).

Before learning about ways to make marijuana your go-to herb in the kitchen, find out whether it’s legal in the state you’re in. Currently, medical marijuana is legal in 30 states and Washington, D.C., while eight states and the District of Columbia have legalized it for recreational use. Thirteen states, however, have decriminalization laws in effect, so make sure to know what the legalities are where you live first.
I am a teetotaler, I don't drink, smoke or do drugs, but I also have no problem with other people doing whatever they want with their own bodies. I also consider myself to be a fairly competent chef, and combined with the fact that this book was only $3, I thought it might be an interesting read. Additionally, my grandfather died from wasting syndrome secondary to pulmonary fibrosis; had medical marijuana been available he probably would have lived several years longer and I'd have likely needed to learn how to prepare medicinal edibles.
With 4/20 around the corner and more legalized recreational marijuana than ever before, both heavy stoners and first-time tokers are asking the same question when it comes to weed in the kitchen: What is the difference between cannabis oil and marijuana butter? While they do have a lot of similarities, confusing the two can have serious consequences—getting uncomfortably stoned, ruining a pan, or even wasting your weed. To truly understand their unique and similar qualities, we need to look at how they’re made, how they’re used, and where you can get them.
How to Make Cannabis Infused Rice Crispy Treats Even though we are all adults here, we all crave the comfort foods of our childhood from time to time. Honestly, who can resist the ooey-gooey goodness of melted marshmallow mixed with warm rice crispies — especially when they are infused with your favorite plant? Talk about an irresistible combination for nearly anyone but diabetics. Making a good batch of weed infused rice crispy treats comes down to using high-quality ingredients and following a few simple directions. Use this helpful step-by-step guide to get started with your first batch of canna-crispies: You …
You’ll first want to know which family the marijuana you’re cooking with belongs to. “There’s sativa, which is more uplifting, and [gives you] more energy and focus,” Jeff explains. “Indica is the opposite, it’s a much more relaxed feeling. An indica-based strain will make you chill, relaxed. It will give you what people refer to as couch-lock, where you’re pretty much just hanging out and don’t really want to move.”
By the time you finish mixing together your marijuana/egg/food coloring mix, the ham that’s been cooking should be done. Remember to keep an eye on it while mixing up the eggs as well, to make sure that it doesn’t burn. When the ham has finished cooking to your liking, pour the eggs over the ham in the frying pan. Continue to cook the eggs and ham together until the eggs are scrambled (it shouldn’t take too long). Serve up your green eggs and ham with some toast (preferably with medicated butter or jelly on top!) and enjoy your holiday!
Super Baked Cannabis Buffalo Wings are on point for every stoner. A great addition for any party! The prep time is really only 15 minutes. Cannabis Buffalo Wings do have to be refrigerated for at least one hour so the flour coating gets firm before baking them. We like to prep them the night before and refrigerate them over night. If you like your wings really spicy you can always add more cayenne pepper to the dry mixture and/or use a spicier hot sauce. Enjoy!
Hamilton Beach makes a line of slow cookers (pictured in this article) that are great for reducing cooking odors when making marijuana oil.  I am sure the fine folks at Hamilton Beach did not design the Stay and Go Slow Cooker for this specific purpose, but nonetheless they work great. That’s because it has a rubber gasket on the lid and a clamp you can use to keep the slow cooker tightly closed.  People going to pot luck suppers (no, not the kinds with cannabis) love this feature as you can transport food in the slow cooker without it sloshing over.  But for cannabis cooks its beauty is in the fact that you will hardly smell the odor of simmering marijuana when infusing butter or oil.  At least not until you open the lid.  I discovered this quite by accident, but it works.  The Stay and Go Slow Cooker is also a quality product to use when making non-cannabis infused meals.  Check it out!
Set up a double boiler (take a large mason jar and a large saucepan and fill the pan about half way with water). Take your coconut oil and chips and add them to the mason jar, letting the chips slowly melt. It’s important to do this slowly so that you won’t lose any THC from the oil or butter that you’re using. Once the chips are melted, add in your Karo syrup. Be sure that everything is mixed (once the chips have melted fully, you can move the mixture to a bowl but you have to be quick because the liquid solidifies quickly once the heat source is removed) and then pour the mixture in to a saran-wrap lined 8×8 pan. Be sure that the saran-wrap covers the sides of the pan that you’re using so that the candy doesn’t stick. The wrap should overhang far enough that you can now wrap the top of the saran-wrap over the candy, fully covering it. Let the candy sit out overnight.
Substitute your marijuana flour for a portion of your recipe's requirement. Generally you are looking at about a 10% substitution but as much as 20% may be ok.[15] This is especially true for baked good that must rise such as breads. Unlike using infused butter or oil, marijuana flour is a true substitution. Marijuana flour doesn't act quite the same as regular flour.
I love the taste of smoked or vaped cannabis. I do not like the taste of it in my food. Most people do not, but I know a handful of folks who do. But from a culinary/flavor profile/foodie perspective, most often the flavor of cannabis does not enhance most recipes. Your taking offense to this is the equivalent of getting mad at someone because they don’t like the flavor of broccoli, or beer, or whatever. It’s just silly. If you like it, more power to you, cannabis cooking is a whole lot easier for you. But most of my readers do not like a strong cannabis flavor in their food and neither do I.
All of this has produced a new category of cannabis user: people trying it for the first time, to see what the fuss is about, or coming back to it after a decades-long hiatus. Businesspeople see a future in which cannabis is part of a functional, even aspirational life style. Like Julia Child introducing Americans to French cuisine, Wolf serves as both a guide and an ambassador to this world. She was a chef and a food editor for many years, and she stands out as a source of reliable information in a nascent industry without dependable methods for cooking and dosing. Ricardo Baca, the founding editor of the Cannabist, told me, “Laurie represents a voice in the food-and-cannabis space that can be trusted.” Her columns are full of global ingredients and lush food photography meant to attract what she calls “the CB2 and West Elm crowd.” Her books would not seem out of place on the shelf next to the latest tome from the Barefoot Contessa or Yotam Ottolenghi. Evan Senn, the editor of the California-based cannabis magazine Culture, told me that, increasingly, foodies are the target audience for pot. “I love to drink wine, and I’m kind of a snob about it,” she said. “I’m not going to drink Franzia out of a cardboard box. I’m going to buy a nice bottle of Pinot Noir and aerate it and enjoy it. I have the same approach to edibles.”

“If you’re stoned, it’s highly entertaining,” says cannabis chocolatier and co-host Vanessa Lavorato. The summer before Bong Appétit started filming, Lavorato says she slowly built up her tolerance to edibles, so she could better handle herself while stoned on air. In the end, all her hard work didn’t matter much. “You can’t hide it. You’re just really high on camera, which hopefully is funny for people.”
When I arrived at Wolf’s house for dinner, she was puttering around the kitchen. The rest of the Wolf family—which is also a kind of professional support team—congregated in the living room. Laurie’s husband, Bruce, is a commercial photographer who takes all the pictures for his wife’s columns. Their adult son, Nick, works at an education startup, but his wife, Mary, a thirty-two-year-old Oklahoman, is Wolf’s business partner. She helps run their baked-goods operation, which sells a line of edibles under the name Laurie & MaryJane. Bruce made a joke about the family business: “They call us the Wolf Cartel.”
You can’t take a Le Cordon Bleu class in THC or crib from Julia Child or Thomas Keller. Due to federal regulations, it’s tough for medical researchers to investigate cannabis, let alone food science or culinary programs. Chefs working with cannabis are literally writing their own cookbooks and becoming amateur scientists in search of the perfect high enrobed in the perfect meal.
There’s so many stoners that love to wake and bake. The only thing that can be added to an awesome morning smoke session to make it better is coffee. Stoners love their coffee. What happens if you’re rushing though and you have to make a choice? Not anymore. Following this short recipe will provide you with the most delicious medicated coffee drink for those busy days!
Hi, Congratulations on making your first batch! The short answer is yes, you need a double boiler. I will tell you that coconut oil on the double boiler is not the simplest method. It does require you to watch the infusion that it does not get too hot or too thick, as moisture will escape during the process, thickening your infusion. Also be certain to not let the water boil off in the bottom vessel. A candy thermometer will definitely come in handy to ensure your infusion temps stay below 180 degrees (I like 140 or so). Personally, I recommend using a crock pot or slow cooker. You don’t have to watch it all the time like you do with a double boiler and you can be sure your temps will not get too high. I go over both these methods in detail in my Cannabis Cooking For Home Cooks course. You should check it out.
“I cook for a lot of sick people out there,” he says. “I don’t charge to do this. They acquire the cannabis, and I’ll go there and cook a meal for them. The most important thing is, when I go and cook, I teach them how to do it themselves. Because I can’t feed everybody on a constant basis, and for a lot of people, this is not recreational. This is a lifestyle change they’re making, that they can actually use cannabis they’ve been prescribed for medicinal purposes.”
Start off by grinding up the rosin chips in the coffee grinder until they are a fine powder in the coffee grinder. Set them aside and take a measuring cup and scoop the coconut oil in to it. Put the measuring cup with the coconut oil in the microwave and heat it slowly until the oil is a liquid. Measure out your required amount (I believe you will need 1 1/3 cups total for the two boxes) and pour it in to a pot. Add in the rosin chips and let the mixture simmer for about half an hour to forty five minutes, stirring occasionally. Make sure to keep the heat low. If the mixture is bubbling a lot, it’s too hot. After the time is up on the canna-coconut oil, you need to strain the mixture through cheesecloth to extract the plant matter. Over a bowl, strain the oil in the cheesecloth (be sure that you squeeze the cloth to make sure that you get all of the oil) and mix up the brownie batter following the instructions on the box. Finish cooking them according to the brownie instructions. Once they are done cooking in the oven, you will have some extremely potent and incredibly delicious coconut-canna-brownies made with recycled rosin chips! Enjoy!
Marijuana butter and cannabis-infused oil can be ingested in a variety of ways. Once you’ve created the product, it can be used as a cooking ingredient for any recipe—minding that most baked goods work best with butter. However, one thing to consider is the temperature of the dish you’re preparing—heating the marijuana butter or oil to temperatures exceeding 245 degrees Fahrenheit will burn the THC. For a more simple application, the butter can be used as a spread on toast or even just dosed orally by itself. Some choose cannabis-infused oil as a medicinal ingredient in topical salves, lotions, and ointment, as it can be absorbed through the skin once it has gone through the decarboxylation process.
Process:In a small mason jar mix in 1 gram High CBD Hash Oil to 3 fl. oz. of high-proof alcohol. Seal lid on the jar and shake vigorously. Place mixture into freezer. Leave for a minimum of 5 days shaking the jar twice daily and placing back in the freezer. Using a coffee filter and a separate container, strain the liquid removing any impurities (there should be very little solids). Pour the tincture into the 1 fl. oz.  eyedroppers.
Healthy eating is important in the life of a stoner! Stir fry has always been a favorite of mine and now you can make it medicated! It’s a far cry from the food we made in Home Ec in middle school but it tastes even better, now that we’re old enough not to burn the veggies to the pan. You can add in veggies or meats if you feel like it and of course, more bud if you feel inclined. Just always remember that eating cannabis is much different than smoking cannabis and you should always know your tolerance before eating too much!
You could eat a pound of raw cannabis and not get high. That’s because the main functional ingredient in a cannabis bud is in the form of a compound called tetrahydrocannabinolic acid, or THCA. THCA has no psychoactive effect. But delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, does. Applying heat to THCA kicks off a process called decarboxylation, which transforms it into THC.  When cannabis is smoked, THCA converts to THC along the way, and the process is largely taken for granted. Basically, every pot smoker, from a cancer patient to a teenage toker, embarks on an act of chemistry when they flick the lighter. But if you want to eat it instead of smoke it, things get more complicated. The most common way people decarboxylate, or “decarb,” cannabis for cooking is by toasting it on low heat (240 degrees Fahrenheit/116 degrees Celsius is a commonly recommended temperature) in an oven.
As to how much bud to use, that depends on how strong you want the oil. The recipes on this site use 1/2 ounce (14 grams) per one cup of oil or butter. That said, when cooking for myself, I use double that amount. I have a high tolerance, but even for those who are “lightweights” making stronger infusions allows you to use less of them in order to get the same dose. Less infusion in the finished recipe means better flavor. If you haven’t already, my free online Dosing class at http://www.Cannademy.com can help you fine tune and adjust your recipes for what you need. If you are unsure of how much you need, please see this article to determine your ideal dose, because everyone is different and not just a little different.
All in all, they’re not so different—but they’re definitely not the same. Cannabis oil can be used to make marijuana butter, but not all marijuana butter is made from cannabis oil. While nearly anyone with cooking experience can make marijuana-infused oil or butter, making cannabis oil should be left to the chemists, and while weed and cannabis oil are mostly readily available in legal states, pre-made marijuana butter can be hard to find—leaving both legal residents and those getting their bud on the black market in the same boat: making it at home.
Cannabis-infused oil is probably the most versatile medium and a great place to start, since it can be used for baking desserts, sautéing veggies, frying up your morning eggs, or in your salad dressing. In addition, as is the case with cooking anything at home, you have complete control over its preparation. Does peanut oil hold a special place in your heart? Make cannabis-infused peanut oil!
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