These milled cannabis blend are a fused combination of our high-quality strains, available in three distinct varieties: sativa, indica and hybrid. Each Maker’s Mix blend is already pre-milled into small pieces and decarboxylated. This means when you want to make your own edibles or cannabis-infused topicals, much of the work is already done for you. Instead of having to grind, bake and cool your medical cannabis flower, simply use our Maker’s Mix and you’re ready to start.
I make herbal oils for lotions etc, massage oils. I use a Mason jar, or Ball Jar to heat the oil. They are tempered and won’t crack. The direction here are pretty accurate. The slow cooker method is probably the easiest.,. less over heating and doesn’t need watching over every hour. you have to experiment. The butter is easy, but again, you have to decarbolize and stand over so it doesn’t burn. I just prefer to roll and smoke. I am also in my 60’s and have been smoking since I was 14. My dad moved the family to MIami in 68. It was one big party every day. Hard not to be caught up in other drugs that were everywhere.
The daughter of legendary singer and songwriter, Bob Marley, penned this compilation of recipes that fits right in with Marley Natural’s clean, green, holistic lifestyle brand. It gives readers the chance to try their hands at making some of her family’s favorite (mostly vegetarian) Jamaican recipes. Intimate stories of her life growing up on the island, insight into how she includes cannabis in her personal wellness routine, and directions for infused beauty treatments accompany this robust collection of recipes.
Super Baked Cannabis Buffalo Wings are on point for every stoner. A great addition for any party! The prep time is really only 15 minutes. Cannabis Buffalo Wings do have to be refrigerated for at least one hour so the flour coating gets firm before baking them. We like to prep them the night before and refrigerate them over night. If you like your wings really spicy you can always add more cayenne pepper to the dry mixture and/or use a spicier hot sauce. Enjoy!

Take a small pot and add in your cannabis and Everclear. Keep the heat on medium low, at a simmer but never at a boil. This heat will burn off a lot of the alcohol, hopefully allowing you to drink this lemonade without getting hammered. The alcohol is in the recipe in order to extract the THC from the cannabis. After you have brought the cannabis and alcohol up to the right temp, add in half of the glass of water. The mixture should cook until about half of it is evaporated. Then, strain the mixture through cheese cloth to remove any leftover cannabis sediment. Be sure to squeeze the cheesecloth out to make sure that you get all of the trapped liquid. Then, you can add in the rest of the water, freshly squeezed lemon juice, and sugar as you see fit. Store this drink in the fridge! Enjoy!
This cookbook may be written by a humorous pseydonym, but the recipes inside are no joke! The Marijuana Chef is back with a full color edition of the much loved stoner cookbook. This book has been a best seller for over 10 years, with easy to follow recipes that make marijuana cooking easily accessible to anyone, regardless of skill level and experience.
As always, you first preheat the oven. This recipe calls for the oven to be set to 375 degrees. Grab a mixing bowl and mix in your sugars and the cannabutter, mixing them together well. Add in your eggs, pudding mix, and vanilla. Stir everything together until the mixture is creamy. Mix together the flour and baking soda and gradually add in to the mixing bowl. Stir everything together well (use a mixer if it makes you more comfortable). Then, proceed to stir in the chocolate chips. Measuring them out by the teaspoonful, place the cookies on to an ungreased baking sheet (Or you can grease it with some cannabutter to give the cookies an even stronger effect). Bake the cookies in the preheated oven for about 11 minutes or until they are lightly browned. Allow the cookies to cool before serving and enjoy your new twist on an old favorite!
To smoke hash oil with a spliff, add the hash oil when rolling on top of the herbal weed.  This is a good way to add a kick to cheap pot.  It may take some practice to get it smoking properly.  It’s also possible to add on top of the weed in a bowl.  Dab it on to the side of the bowl to avoid it saturating the intake, but not too close to the side as to miss the weed, as pure oil is more likely to catch fire.  You want it between the intake and the bowl edge, on top of the weed.
Remove the dough from the food processor and wrap it in plastic. Place the dough in the refrigerator until it is cold all the way through. Get a cookie sheet and grease it with some cooking spray, then roll the dough out on the tray so that it covers the whole pan. Next, you can either use a Goldfish cookie cutter or one of your choosing (I know that they make weed shaped ones, even though the crackers will be orange). These crackers are delicious. Plus, since they’re medicated, they make a good middle-of-your-shift snack if you’re having a rough day at work. Or they’re good to munch on while watching a movie. I highly suggest that you try these crackers if you’re feeling up to baking one day. Not only that, but since you’ll have leftover dough, you can make smaller, shapeless crackers that are also medicated.

Disclaimer: This is not intended as medical advice. I’m not a doctor. I’m also not a lawyer and can’t defend you if you get busted trying to make this recipe in a state that still considers possession or cultivation of cannabis a criminal act. I don’t agree with this law, but I’d never advocate that you break it. Jail would suck. Instead, I strongly advise that you work to change the law in your state or nation by supporting and being active in grassroots organizations that are trying to legalize cannabis in your area (they’re everywhere). This recipe is heretoforth only intended for people who live in states or countries where medical or recreational use of cannabis is legal, who are 21 and older, of sound mind and who understand that operating heavy machinery (cars, trucks, planes, etc.) under the influence of any intoxicant, including marijuana, is incredibly dangerous, immature, and wholly stupid. Please don’t ever eat and drive. Support public transportation or use the two legs that evolution gave you and walk your sweet ass wherever it is that you need to go.


Pros: Edibles have demonstrated the longest-duration medicinal effect of any method of medication. Also, the total amounts of cannabinoids available through eating are multiplied and could have a much stronger effect than smoking. Coconut oil can be mixed with any foods to keep medication very discrete. Butter can also be used but use unsalted as it will separate. There are hundreds of recipes to meet dietary needs and taste pallets.
How to Make Infused Coconut Oil Making cannabis-infused coconut oil is as simple as steeping quality herb in a quality oil. Machines are available to make cannabis-infused coconut oil, but the infusion process can be done right on a stovetop or hot plate with the help of a double boiler. What You Will Need Double boiler (you can make one if you don’t own one) ¼ to ½ ounce of cannabis 1 cup of coconut oil (organic, expeller-pressed works best for this process) 2-3 feet of cooking twine (a clean unused white shoestring will work in a pinch) Cheesecloth (about an 8” x 10” piece) TIP: A ratio of one quarter ounce of cannabis to one cup of oil is a good starting point. If you want a potent oil, high-quality flower (15%+ THC) works well. However, until you become more comfortable with the process or if you have limited funds, using shake, trim and/or kief work fine (avoid stems and seeds). Cooking Directions Prepare the “herb packet”: Lay the cheese cloth out flat Place the cannabis (breaking up larger pieces) into the middle and distribute evenly over a small area (remember the packet needs to fit into the top pan) Fold in opposite ends to cover the herb Now fold in one of the open ends, tuck and roll Tie the roll of herb tightly with cooking twine (tying a knot in one end and then guiding the twine through it works good) Fill the bottom pan of a double boiler with a few inches of water (allowing enough space so that it does not touch the top pan) and set the shallow pan on top. Place over medium heat to a gentle boil - NOT a rolling boil. Add 1 cup of coconut oil to the top pan. When the coconut oil is almost melted, add about 1 cup of water so that the liquid will cover the herb packet [Note: Coconut oil is nonpolar and water is polar so they will naturally separate when chilled; and THC and CBD are not soluble in water, but are in certain carrier oils. Therefore, the coconut oil acts as the carrier and will “soak” up the cannabinoids, leaving any impurities in the water.] Continue heating the oil and water mixture until all of the coconut oil is melted and then add the herb packet - pressing down gently into the liquid using a metal spoon. Cover and leave to cook for 90 minutes, checking back every half hour or so to flip over the packet and stir it around gently. Also, check the water in the bottom pan to make sure it is not boiling too hard and that the water level is still good - be careful to avoid any escaping steam when removing the top pan. After 90 minutes, the oil and water mixture should be a deep green color. At this point, turn off the heat and remove the herb packet and place in a bowl. Squeeze out any oil that is trapped in the “herb packet” by pressing with a spoon (when it cools down, you can give it another squeeze by hand to get every drop). Add this to the liquid mixture and place in the refrigerator to cool. When the mixture is cooled, the water and oil separate (dirty looking water on the bottom and a nice green color solidified oil containing the good stuff on top). Gently poke 2 or 3 holes through the oil, turn over (holding your hand gently over the oil) and drain the water off. If you are not going to use the oil immediately, store in a container (glass preferred) and label with date, strain and ratio. This will help you determine which strains and in what quantities work best for you. The most important thing to remember is that the effects of consuming cannabis-infused coconut oil (directly or as an ingredient in a cooked dish) are usually slow-acting due to the cannabinoids having to be digested first. As such, it may take up to three (3) hours for you to feel its maximum effects, and those effects could last for awhile. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed or concerned about overdosing, don’t panic -- no one has ever died as a direct result of consuming cannabis. Choosing the Right Strain Your next choice will be determining what strain(s) of cannabis to use. The infusion process does not drastically change the effects or flavors of the variety of cannabis used. Therefore, you will want to use a cannabis strain that delivers the desired effects you want to achieve (indica, sativa, hybrid, high-CBD). Most importantly, you want to be sure that the cannabis you use is free from impurities (such as mold, fungus, bugs, and pesticides). If the cannabis is compromised, the infusion process will not correct it. Cooking Temperatures Cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are all affected differently by heat. A double boiler traps steam between the pans (provided you have a good seal) and remains steady about 212° F. The most volatile terpenes will start to evaporate around 70° F (filling the air with a pungent aroma). A majority of the remaining terpenes will begin to evaporate rapidly around 100° F. The boiling points of flavonoids range between 273.2° and 352.4° F, so the dominant flavors of the strain you use should still be evident in the infused oil. Cannabinoids, specifically THC and CBD, exist in acidic and activated forms. In the plant, these cannabinoids exist almost entirely in the acidic form and are known as THCA and CBDA. When heated, these acidic forms undergo a chemical reaction called decarboxylation that results in THCA converting to THC and CBDA converting to CBD. Complete activation occurs when heated to 220° F for 90 minutes. In theory, the double boiler cooks at 212° F, but many factors can change that number, so you may need to experiment by adding or subtracting a few minutes to achieve your desired effects. Remember, if you are going to use the oil in a recipe that will expose it to further heat, you don’t want it to be fully activated at this stage. Further, coconut oil has an average smoking point of 350° F, and can be very tricky to cook on direct heat. A double boiler cooks by steam so the oil doesn’t burn easily. Overcooking the oil compromises the fats and the taste will be most unappealing. If this happens, all you can do is throw it out, wipe the pan clean, and start over. Health Benefits Cannabis and coconut oil are what some would call the perfect pair. Coupling coconut oil, “a vegan-friendly super food,” with cannabis, “nature’s miracle plant,” makes a lot of sense. Coconut oil is a saturated oil made primarily of medium-chain fatty acids. It is safe to ingest in edible form and is easily digested. It gets its extra punch from lauric acid (C12), which comprises about 50% of the total fatty acids, and has been linked to many health benefits: reducing abdominal obesity, accelerating healing time for wounds, delivering antioxidant properties, lowering lipid components (e.g. cholesterol, triglycerides), preventing bone loss and more. Some people even use coconut oil as a daily detox. Saturated fats have gotten a bad rap for decades. They have been accused of contributing to high cholesterol, heart disease, obesity, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Much confusion and contradictory evidence exists on the subject, even among health care professionals. Professionals, like Dr. Aseem Malhotra, are trying to set the record straight. Dr. Malhotra gained attention after the publication of his peer-reviewed editorial in the 2013 British Medical Journal (BMJ), wherein he seriously challenged the conventional view on saturated fats, and found no significant association between saturated fat and cardiovascular risk. Coconut Oil Uses There are so many things you can do with cannabis infused coconut oil including: Drizzle over hot cooked pastas, grains, cereals and vegetables Great for sauces and dressings Add to hot cooked soups and stews Use as a poultry rub Pan fry foods like scrambled egg, fish, bananas, chicken Put a spoonful in your coffee, tea or hot chocolate Add to smoothies Types of Coconut Oil Organic, virgin (or extra-virgin), raw, unrefined, centrifuged and cold-pressed are all terms you want to look for when selecting a coconut oil for ingesting with no cooking or for use in low-heat cooking. These oils typically deliver a strong coconut flavor. Organic, refined, expeller-pressed and solvent-free are the terms you are looking for when selecting an oil for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, especially when using higher temperatures. These refined oils also tend to have a lighter coconut flavor. Virgin Oil: Unrefined / Centrifuged Oil True virgin oil is a centrifuged coconut oil produced without using heat. It is considered one of the highest quality oils, but also one of the most expensive coconut oils on the market today. Terms like raw, pure and unrefined are associated with virgin oils. Virgin coconut oil has a more distinct coconut flavor. It is considered by most to be extremely mild and smooth, and can be eaten right off a spoon. Producing high-quality virgin oil is timely and expensive. Using a machine (centrifuge) cooled by chilled water, coconut cream is produced from pressing the fresh, white meat of the coconut and then concentrating it to yield more and more oil while the proteins and water soluble constituents are separated out and more of the phytonutrients are preserved. Unlike olive oil and some of the other oils, there are no standards to be met in the coconut oil industry to claim extra-virgin status. It is mostly a buzz word used for marketing. Cold-pressed Oils Cold-pressed coconut oils are also often referred to as raw or unrefined. The extraction method used to produce these oils is very similar to the centrifuged method used to make virgin coconut oils. The cold-pressing method however uses a drying process, which can be accomplished using varying degrees of heat. Therefore, very few cold-pressed oils are truly virgin oils. The method of drying and amount of heat used will determine the quality and taste of the coconut oil. Oils processed at high temperatures may taste of toasted coconut, while those processed at lower temperatures tend to deliver more of a mild, raw coconut flavor. If the oil was poorly processed, it may exhibit burnt or rancid qualities. Refined or RBD Coconut Oils Most coconut oils available on the market today are refined or RBD (refined, bleached and deodorized). If a label doesn’t say it is otherwise, then it is most likely refined. These are typically the least expensive of all coconut oils. Refined coconut oil should deliver a light, delicate flavor. The refining process strips away some of the nutrients, but it doesn’t have to alter other attributes of the coconut oil (such as fatty acid profile, taste, aroma). The methods for producing refined oils varies significantly, and can be accomplished with or without harsh solvents (like lye or hexane). If a product doesn’t say it is solvent free, it is a safe bet it was chemically processed and you should avoid it. Otherwise, RBD oils are fine to use, especially for cooking. Bleaching simply refers to the filtering process to remove impurities and is generally not a chemical process. Organic usually signifies that no harsh chemicals or solvents were used in the production. Expeller-pressed Extraction Method The expeller-pressed extraction method is used to produce RBD oils. During production the coconut meat is dried (most often by sun or smoke) and then pressed in large expeller presses. The resulting coconut oil is crude and must be refined or cleaned to minimize free fatty acids, remove remaining moisture, and minimize bad flavors or aromas. Expeller-pressed coconut oils can be a good option if you do not want to pay the premium for virgin oils. They are also a good option for those who do not like the taste of coconuts, or don’t want a strong coconut flavor for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, certain foods. Just be certain that no chemicals or solvents were used in the process. MCT Oil Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are a form of saturated fatty acid that has numerous health benefits. Coconut oil is one great source of MCTs. Roughly 65% of the fatty acids in coconut oil are medium-chain triglycerides. There are four kinds of MCTs: caproic (C6), caprylic (C8), capric (C10) and lauric (C12) acids. Generally speaking, the shorter the chain (meaning the lower the number of carbons the acid has), the faster the body can turn the fatty acids into ketones (usable energy). MCT oil is not an oil found in nature, but is instead manufactured by machine. The fatty acids are extracted through an industrial process of fractionation and concentrated into MCT oil. The logic is that since MCTs are healthy, the more the better. However, lauric acid (C12) is totally void, or present only in minuscule amounts in MCT oil. This has caused much debate on the matter. One side argues that MCT oils don’t include lauric acid because it is rare and more costly to include, and the other side argues that C12 is a less efficient way to obtain energy and adds nothing extra to the product. MCT oil makers advocate using only C8 and C10 (or 100% of one or the other) because they are the most rapidly metabolized for energy. Choosing between coconut oil and MCT oil, or deciding which one is better, should not be a concern when you understand the differences. On one hand, coconut oil is high in lauric acid which has well-documented health benefits, and MCT oil has very little to offer in that way. On the other hand, MCT oil may help raise energy levels better than coconut oil, but little proof is available to validate this claim. If you do plan to use an MCT oil, be sure the label clearly lists the ingredients and discloses how it was produced. Many MCT oils are chemically altered and contain unhealthy fillers like polyunsaturated fats, and due to their refining process may use harsh solvents and chemicals in manufacturing. Storage and Shelf-Life Be sure to keep the infused oil in a container with a tight lid (insects and critters love it). A glass jar with a wide mouth works well so that you can scoop it out easily. The infused oil should be kept out of direct sunlight. It can be refrigerated, but it is not necessary. It can also be frozen, but freezing it will change the taste - sometimes for the better but sometimes for the worse. Coconut oil is very stable and depending on the kind, can last anywhere from 18 months to several years. Opinions differ on how long cannabis-infused oil can be kept. Most agree that degradation begins after 2-3 months, and sooner after repeated exposure to air (opening and shutting the jar) or overexposure to sunlight or heat. This does not mean it is unusable, but you will definitely start to notice a change in the taste and effectiveness as the cannabinoids begin to degrade.
When making your own edibles using dried flower, you first have to grind the cannabis flowers and bake them. If you’re making your own canna oil or butter, the recipe always starts with cooking the dried flower in the oven before it can be steeped in the oil. This heating process—whether it happens through a portable vaporizer or your kitchen’s oven—is called decarboxylation. In addition, accessory products like the LEVO and the Magical Butter Maker can help simplify the process.
First, as always, preheat your oven to 350 degrees and be sure to put a center rack in the oven. Grease a 10x3in Bundt pan and sprinkle flour all over it. This will prevent the cake from sticking to the inside of the pan once it’s finished. You don’t want the cake to get stuck. It’ll make a mess and you will ruin your cake. It is also important that you leave all of your ingredients sitting out at room temp for at least 40 minutes before you start baking. This includes the eggs, buttermilk, and butter.
This is a slightly healthier snack that stoners can enjoy… And get stoned while eating it as well! Toasted bananas aren’t nearly as bad for you as pizza so if you’re looking to stay a bit healthier, this medible is highly recommended for you. Not only that but it’s a good snack for a cold winter’s night and will distract you from the awful snowstorms some of us are about to deal with! And if you’re not going to freeze this winter, you can enjoy these snacks while laying by the pool.
The number of people who think that sweets are the only kind of edibles you can make with marijuana consistently surprises me. The fact is most any food can be infused with cannabis. In fact, it is usually easier to hide the green herbal flavor that most people don’t like in spicy and/or savory foods. There are lots of terrific cannabis cookbooks on the market to help you expand you cannabis culinary repertoire, including my own Cannabis Gourmet Cookbook and The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. You can also find lots of recipes, both savory and sweet, on this blog.
This recipe is super simple and the only other step that you need to take is putting them in the freezer. You have two choices. You can put the whole bowl in the freezer and let them freeze in a large mass. This method is good if you prefer to eat ice cream right out of the tub. Just make sure that you have a good container that seals well. The other way that you can go about this is to roll the mixture in to small balls and freeze them that way. Whichever method you choose, this treat will cure hunger and get you baked!
 After bananas are battered, place them in the very hot oil and let them sizzle and get yummy until they turn golden brown in color. Leave them to cool on a plate with 2 paper napkins to soak up any excess oil. Once cooled, add a little more pizazz and sprinkle them with sugar and cinnamon. Or if you’re in the mood to be really naughty, serve with ice cream and indulge yourself in a banana sweet stone.
This book, based on the Munchies and Viceland television series “Bong Appétit,” was published in October by Ten Speed Press. (This is in itself notable, as Ten Speed is one of the best cookbook publishers around, and continues the legitimate trajectory of the cannabis cooking genre.) The book has a comprehensive introduction that includes topics such as dosing, techniques, methods of decarboxylation and infusion, cannabis pairing tips, questions to ask your dispensary, tips on equipment and more. The recipes are sourced from the Munchies test kitchen and from many well-known chefs, whose recipes are recalibrated to add cannabis. Thus: Korean fried chicken from Deuki Hong of San Francisco’s Sunday Bird; fried soft-shell crab with shishito pepper mole from Daniela Soto-Innes of Cosme and Atla; and (my favorite) Joan Nathan’s preserved lemons. The Munchies test kitchen also has some fun ones, including herb focaccia with, well, herb; and confit octopus, in which a whole octopus is poached in cannabis-infused olive oil. If that sounds too aspirational, there are instructions for making an apple bong — a hollowed-out apple filled with weed-infused mezcal — at the end of the drinks chapter.

Hello from the Yukon Territory. I’m a senior citizen and relatively new to this edibles game. I’ve started growing my own, outdoors, without too much fanfare. My plants (about 1/2 doz) make a few buds, that are far from high quality. All I do is dry my plants, grind them up in a food processor till close to the consistency of flour, and make small cookies. I use a half teaspoon for measuring the batter–cute little green ovals. My niece and I call them “beetles”. I’m happy with the buzz I get, and it helps with a few aches and pains I get from my senior age, but reading here and elsewhere, I see there is a lot more to the science behind it all. I’m also realizing that a lot of you may find it perhaps crude that I just cook with the pot the way I do, but I’m happy with the simplicity, and will probably continue with this method. However, do I deduce correctly, that my finished product will be better if I heat my dried and ground pot first in the oven, for 20 minutes at 250 degrees, before I make my beetles?


There is no one answer to what constitutes a “decent edible.” If it made you feel good and you were happy with the amount you felt, then it was a decent edible. Doing a calculation based upon marijuana containing 20% THC, your half cup of oil likely contains about 750mg THC. Divide that by the number of cookies to get an approximate per cookie dose. (The government says average weed is 10%, since you have what I assume is good Hawaiian, I figured it at 20%).
Step 10: After about 5 hours, the butter will solidify and some of the water will turn to ice. Take each container one by one over to the sink, take off the lid, and with one hand supporting the ice block, turn container upside down and release. Some water will come pouring out, and the ice just needs to be scraped away from the main butter block. You should be left with a smooth, round slab of light green butter.
If you were looking for the perfect game-day snack to serve to all your pals, then search no more! This nacho cheese is creamy cheesy bliss and when the high kicks in while the game’s on it won’t matter if your team wins or not, either way you’ll be happy dipping crunchy chips into this dip again and again. Both canna-butter and canna olive oil can be used in this dip so be prepared for some pretty potent bites.
Sayegh wears chef’s whites. He’s quick to smile, athletic, with his hair cropped short on the sides and a tight burst of sandy curls on top. His Maltese-poodle mix, MooMoo, is cavorting around his feet. Just a few years ago, you wouldn’t have found him in uniform, but pondering his fate at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He was a sophomore studying molecular biology, homesick for the mansaf and other dishes his Jordanian family raised him on—and a fledgling pot smoker. A budding scientist, he decided that if he was going to get high, he should probably find out what it was doing to his body.

Cons: Users report that topical solutions infused with cannabis are short lasting and not effective over a prolonged period in comparison to edibles or tinctures. Coconut oil is pure fat so application is greasy and users should be cautious to come in contact with clothing or bedding reduce stains. Some symptoms, like internal pain, may not be reduced by topical use.
Wolf’s mixed nuts have had a lot of traction. She adapted them from a Danny Meyer recipe and added infused coconut oil, a staple in her kitchen because it can also be used topically, “so you’re getting more bang for your buck.” (An elderly friend of Wolf’s rubs it on his hands to treat his rheumatoid arthritis.) Wolf’s newest book, “Cooking with Cannabis,” emphasizes comfort foods like mac and cheese and meatloaf. There’s a chapter called “Recipes for One,” intended for solo eaters. “It’s great to be able to make yourself ramen,” she said. (The cannabis goes in the broth, mixed with sesame oil.)
In some ways, cooking with cannabis is just regular cooking, with a few adjustments for taste and technical considerations. The food can’t be cooked at temperatures higher than three hundred and forty degrees, because that would destroy the THC. “It’s been a little bit of a challenge cooking some foods that normally benefit from a really high heat start,” Wolf said. An example is fried chicken, which she recommends topping with infused oil or salsa.
But if you understand the potency, you can figure out something like, If I use a third of a cup of oil, each individual brownie's going to be 15 milligrams, and I don't want that. I want each of my brownies to be five milligrams, so I'm just going to make one third of that third be canna-oil, and the other two-thirds will be regular oil. You can actually use my online calculator to figure out how much oil to use based on the THC potency of the bud in order to make edibles with the potency you desire.
Combine in your glass jar, 3 ounces of drinking alcohol with your ounce of hash oil, or in a 3:1 ratio, according to the strength of your hash oil.  Seal the mixture and put it in the freezer for 6 or more days, shaking a few times per day.  Now store your tincture in your one ounce eye drop bottles.  Before taking, you should first calculate how much thc each dropper, and each drop holds, according to the strength of the hash oil and how much you’ve used.  This method has the most easy method of consumption.  Use the eye dropper to squirt a measured amount of weed tincture under the tongue, hold for half a minute, then swallow it down.  The thc and other cannabinoids will bring health benefits, but the psychoactive ingredients will have less effect because it may not have been activated by heat.  As with any oral consumption, effects come on slow and then goes stronger for longer.  It is important to make sure you know how much cannabinoids you are consuming, and not to re-dose before the effects take hold, which can take as much as one to two hours.
Now, removed the cakes from the muffin pan and let them cool. Once they’ve cooled off, you can start frosting them. Stack whichever colors you want in any way. Frost each layer so that they stick together. If you need to, stick it with a toothpick. The ones I made were a huge mess. Delicious. But a mess. When cut in half, these little surprises will impress all of your friends, especially if you’ve added bud to them! And as always, you can add however much or however little weed you want to. It all depends on your preference! Enjoy!
Cannabis oil extracted via heat and pressure can be used in topicals or ingested by itself orally, but the taste and consistency leave a lot to be desired. The most common way to consume cannabis oil, also known as “concentrate” or “dab,” is by vaporizing or smoking it, but it can also act as an ingredient for an easier method of making weed butter. By simply melting the dab with some butter or oil at a low temperature, mixing them into one substance, you’ve made marijuana butter! Keep in mind, however, that cannabis oil needs to adhere to the same temperature cap of 245 degrees Fahrenheit to minimize the destruction of the THC. One downside to cooking with butter derived from cannabis oil versus marijuana is the stickiness of the product—certain types of oil can leave behind a difficult residue on cookware. (For those reading this tip too late, try rescuing your pan with 99% isopropyl alcohol! It’s super effective.)
Successful website The Stoner's Cookbook already helps marijuana-loving cooks with their archive of hundreds of thousands of cannabis-infused recipes that include meals, snacks, drinks, and desserts. They are now compiling their most popular recipes into a "high-class cannabis cookbook [that] will make history." The book, titled HERB: Mastering the Art of Cooking with Cannabis, has already been featured in a New York Times article and boasts almost 3,000 pre-orders in anticipation of its November 2015 release date. The 200-page book will not only feature hundreds of recipes (like butternut squash soup and a seared bone-in ribeye), but it will also teach readers the science behind marijuana, extraction methods, and medicinal purposes.

“It depends on if you’re in a state where you can legally access it, or if you’re in a prohibition state,” says McDonough. Most cookbooks and guides provide a way to evaluate the quality of your cannabis and give it a ballpark THC percentage, which will help the home cook calculate it. “It’s better than nothing, but it’s still not very precise,” she says.
The first step is to decarboxylate your flower. Ideally, do not grind it but rather break it up into popcorn sized nugs, but it is fine to use shake or ground bud as well. Throw your cannabis right in your decarboxylator (putting it in silicon or a shot glass if you’re using kief/concentrates) and let it run its cycle while you gather your ingredients.

Take a small pot and add in your cannabis and Everclear. Keep the heat on medium low, at a simmer but never at a boil. This heat will burn off a lot of the alcohol, hopefully allowing you to drink this lemonade without getting hammered. The alcohol is in the recipe in order to extract the THC from the cannabis. After you have brought the cannabis and alcohol up to the right temp, add in half of the glass of water. The mixture should cook until about half of it is evaporated. Then, strain the mixture through cheese cloth to remove any leftover cannabis sediment. Be sure to squeeze the cheesecloth out to make sure that you get all of the trapped liquid. Then, you can add in the rest of the water, freshly squeezed lemon juice, and sugar as you see fit. Store this drink in the fridge! Enjoy!


Place egg yolks, remaining 1/4 cup sugar, and salt in a small bowl and whisk until egg yolks are thick and pale yellow.  Whisking vigorously to prevent the eggs from scrambling, whisk in about 1/2 cup of the warm milk mixture.  Continue whisking in milk mixture, about 1/2 cup at a time until it is all incorporated..  Return to heat and cook over medium low stirring constantly, until it starts to thicken.  Do not boil, mixture should only reach about 185 degrees F (if you have a thermometer, if not heat until very hot).  Remove from heat, place in a bowl, cover and chill in the refrigerator until very cold, at least 6 hours.
 Make sure the pan you plan to use is nice and hot before you start adding batter. You can use 1/3 to 1/2 of a cup to determine how much should be poured into the pan. When your pan is hot enough, begin pouring in the batter and be ready to flip it when you see bubbles popping up throughout the batter. For even more simplicity, pour the batter into a waffle maker. Now all that’s left to do is grab the syrup and enjoy the most important meal of the day while cheesing from ear to ear, Marijuana Waffles!

When about an hour has passed, you can puree the blueberries, along with the lime juice and 1/8 of a cup of water. Once the mixture is about halfway done pureeing, you can add in the rest of the cannabis honey just like you did with the raspberry mix. Continue to blend everything together until it is smooth. Pour the mix through the clean sieve in to a clean bowl. Again, you can choose to eat or discard the seeds. Take the molds out of the freeze for the last time and (before pouring the blueberry mix in), put a popsicle stick in each mold. Then, fill them until they are less than 1/2 an inch from the top. Stick them back in the freezer for a solid two hours. Once they’ve completely frozen, remove them and quickly run them under warm water to loosen the sides. Serve to yourself or your friends. Enjoy your lovely medicated, homemade popsicles!
Even though Memorial Day has passed in the States, the barbecues aren’t quite over yet! The 4th of July has yet to happen and there are plenty of weekends left with beautiful weather! Looking to spice up your usually normal barbecue with some cannabis fun? This recipe will teach you how to infuse your BBQ sauce with cannabis, not only giving you a great sauce but also an awesome way to medicate this summer.
Take the sugar, syrup, and water and mix them together in a pot. Set it on the stove over a medium heat and stir them together until they ingredients dissolve. The mixture should begin to boil after a bit. Make sure that all of your ingredients have been mixed well! After the mixture begins to boil, slowly add the color and flavoring to the pot. Your mixture should be heated to about 300 degrees. This part is a little tricky because you have add the tincture very quickly. Speed is necessary at this part in the process because the liquid solidifies as soon as it begins to cool. Once you’ve quickly stirred in the tincture, pour the liquid in to your molds and let them set.
The complete culinary world becomes much more exciting when cooking through the eyes of a stoner chef, and canna-olive-oil in a must in a pot head’s pantry. All you need is a bottle of olive oil and of course some sticky-icky and there’s really no limit to what high foods you can make. Savory, sweet, tangy, you name it and canna-oil will help you put a potent touch on it.
Cannabis Now contributor Jessica Catalano is another strain-specific chef — in fact, she’s the world’s first. She first started posting recipes on her Ganja Kitchen Revolution blog in 2010, choosing strains based on the complementary flavors they add to non-medicated ingredients. The website inspired a book of the same name, where Catalano recommends adding Blue Cheese to biscuits, Pineapple Kush to a piña colada, and Sour Diesel to a Lebanese tabouli. If you can’t afford the book, Catalano still posts plenty of free recipes to her blog.
While summer is over and most people are trying to drink the warmest drinks that they can get their hands on. However, there are some that like to drink lemonade no matter what time of the year it is, warm or cold! This recipe is a great one for cannabis lemonade, using Everclear. Most of the alcohol should be burned off in the extracting process and you can extend the time slightly to make sure that you’ve burned off all of the alcohol.
Because oils are slow-acting and long-lasting, it’s recommended that you start low, and go slow when experimenting with oils. They’re a much more concentrated version of flowers and buds and can have some unpleasant side effects like nausea, dizziness, thirst, and a drop in blood sugar levels if you go too quickly. Taking the oil with food in your stomach has been known to minimize nausea.
When people think of brownies, they don’t usually think of them being too healthy. However, that thought is about to change thanks to the addition of hemp seeds in to the traditional brownie recipe. With the recent explosion of hemp knowledge and support, more and more people are beginning to incorporate hemp in to their diets, more specifically the seeds. The seeds of the hemp plant are the most helpful part, containing an excellent source of vegan protein, dietary fiber and all essential amino acids, plus the added benefit of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.
Topicals don’t make it into your bloodstream, just into your cannabinoid receptors, and can be great for localized pain. Under the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (ACMPR) in Canada, licensed producers of medical cannabis can’t currently manufacture or distribute topicals – but with the distribution of oils, it’s possible for you to make your own (with carrier oils and other bases for creams.)
Now pour your bread mixture evenly into your 2 greased loaf pans and bake in preheated oven at 350* for 55 minutes. A toothpick can be used to check if your bread is done. When toothpick comes out clean your bread is done. If it doesn’t it will need another 5-10 minutes depending on your oven. If your bread is done remove loaves and let cool on a wire rack. This bread does great for freezing and tastes just as fresh once defrosted.
Alice B. Toklas, who presided over literary salons in early twentieth-century Paris with partner Gertrude Stein, firmly ensconced the practice of cooking and eating cannabis in the cultural imagination with The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book. First published in 1954, it offered up a recipe for Hashish Fudge, which “anyone could whip up on a rainy day.” In addition to pulverizing a “bunch of cannabis sativa,” the recipe calls for black peppercorns, dried figs, and peanuts. In an introduction to the 1984 reprint of the book, food writer M.F.K. Fisher wrote that she had never tried one of the fudge brownies, but “am told they taste slightly bitter.” These days, no cannabis chef worth their herb would recommend throwing raw product into baked goods, but brownies can be an ideal vehicle for THC. It just takes a few more steps than Toklas imagined.

Lower the power of the mixer and add in 1 cup of flower, constantly beating, then add 1/2 cup of buttermilk, beating again to make sure that everything is mixing together well. Add in another cup of flour, beating, and then add in the last of the buttermilk, continuously beating. Then add in the remaining flour, pouring it slowly. Continue to beat until the mixture is mixed together well. Remember to get the mix that gets stuck up on the side of the bowl. Grab a stirring instrument and put the beater down. Stir in the lemon juice and lemon zest. Take the mixture and slowly pour it in to the previously greased pan until the pan is three quarters full. Make sure that the batter is even in the pan.
While I am here I would also like to ask about making tinctures and butter. The prescriptions I have for medical marijuana all have exact potency ratios. They have been tested and calculated. Once I decarb the leaf, and add it to the 190 proof Everclear, shake and sit for 5-10 days, strain and bottle. How do I dose it using eye dropper method? Ex: If I use leaf that is 30% THC and decarb it to extract all the THC? Is this potion 30% THC tincture or roughly close if I do it correctly? According to what ratio? For example, there are 50 drops in the bottle. How much THC is in one drop? ( 30% divided by 50? ) Or is each drop 30% ? I am so confused!! I know you have to test it on yourself a drop at a time and just see how it makes you feel.
Most oils come in bottles with small pipettes or syringes with measurements on them. Remember that it takes as long as 1-2 hours for effects to kick in, and by taking another dose before the height of the first effects, you’re risking some side effects. If the oils are in capsule format, measurement is much easier as you just take the recommended amount of capsules throughout your day.
This product can also be placed on top of a standard bowl of cannabis flowers. The oil melts down when heat from a lighter is applied and coats the bowl with a gooey, flammable crust. If the High CBD Hash Oil catches fire just snuff it out and try to keep a rolling cherry (constantly hot and smoking bowl) to maximize the amount of medication consumed.
Many people know to decarboxylate cannabis in the oven first, but it’s worth noting here for anyone who doesn’t know or doesn’t see the point in doing so. You can skip this step and add your raw cannabis to the slow cooker to decarb in the oil, but you might find that this longer oil soak simply worsens the taste of your cannabis oil. It’s also more difficult to control the temperature in a slow cooker and you risk burning off essential cannabinoids, but in an oven, you can set the temperature low and keep it steady.
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