I am a teetotaler, I don't drink, smoke or do drugs, but I also have no problem with other people doing whatever they want with their own bodies. I also consider myself to be a fairly competent chef, and combined with the fact that this book was only $3, I thought it might be an interesting read. Additionally, my grandfather died from wasting syndrome secondary to pulmonary fibrosis; had medical marijuana been available he probably would have lived several years longer and I'd have likely needed to learn how to prepare medicinal edibles.
“When a person eats marijuana product they may not feel anything for a while,” says Dr. Igor Grant, director of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California, San Diego. “And if they were doing it medicinally, they may say, ‘Well, maybe I didn’t have enough,’ and take some more, and then two hours later they’re very, very stoned.”
Medical marijuana is used to treat a variety of issues including chronic pain, childhood epilepsy, and muscle control problems.[1] While consumption of cannabinoids is often accomplished by smoking, eating medical marijuana is typically the preferred method.[2] However, cooking marijuana is not as simple as throwing pot leaves into your brownie mix. You must first create marijuana infused ingredients. Cooking with medical marijuana is then as simple as substituting a marijuana infused ingredient for a regular one.
While some purists will tell you this is hearsay, adding water to your infusing process is a nifty trick. This way, you can infuse at a lower temperature. The amount of water you add is not important, but try to use at least as much water as oil or butter. The water boils off. You can also see the difference in your “washed” end product. It is not as green.
Wolf pulled a Mason jar of infused olive oil from a shelf and encouraged me to smell it. It had a powerfully green scent. “Olive oil infuses beautifully,” she said. “It’s very earthy.” A jar of infused canola oil, on the other hand, smelled like bong water. Wolf had used the infused olive oil to make the stuffed mushrooms as well as a spinach tart. Those who wanted even more weed could slather their food with an infused feta sauce made with olive oil, garlic, parsley, and red onion. “Strong flavors help conceal the taste,” Wolf said. “It is a challenge to keep the foods from tasting like cannabis. That’s probably the hardest thing about making edibles.” Dessert was a “mildly infused” strawberry trifle in a big glass bowl. For palate cleansers, there were frozen grapes—an old standby for Wolf. “They’re wonderful when people get stoned,” she explained.

Many people know to decarboxylate cannabis in the oven first, but it’s worth noting here for anyone who doesn’t know or doesn’t see the point in doing so. You can skip this step and add your raw cannabis to the slow cooker to decarb in the oil, but you might find that this longer oil soak simply worsens the taste of your cannabis oil. It’s also more difficult to control the temperature in a slow cooker and you risk burning off essential cannabinoids, but in an oven, you can set the temperature low and keep it steady.
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