For an additional boost in bioavailability, we suggest adding 1+ teaspoon of soy lecithin to the crockpot with the starting material and coconut oil. Soy lecithin is a naturally occurring compound found in all cells in nature, plants and animals. The inclusion of lecithin homogenizes the oil and boosts your body’s ability to absorb the cannabinoids; resulting in more intense effects from the same starting material.
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These milled cannabis blend are a fused combination of our high-quality strains, available in three distinct varieties: sativa, indica and hybrid. Each Maker’s Mix blend is already pre-milled into small pieces and decarboxylated. This means when you want to make your own edibles or cannabis-infused topicals, much of the work is already done for you. Instead of having to grind, bake and cool your medical cannabis flower, simply use our Maker’s Mix and you’re ready to start.
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 Next, fill a large pan with the vegetable oil and let that get nice and hot. Remember to be careful when handling hot oi,l it has a tendancy to be mean and pop around when it’s hot. You’ll know the oil is the right temperature if you put a small drop of batter in, and it starts to sizzle and turn brown, now it’s ready to start cooking your special bananas.
Decarboxylation: Ingesting or cooking with fresh cannabis will not have much of an effect because the THC has to be “activated” with heat. This process is called decarboxylation, or “decarbing.” Typically, THC is decarboxylated before cooking in order to produce the effects of cannabis. It is worth noting that it must be heated slowly in order to retain any product for the cooking process.
All in all, they’re not so different—but they’re definitely not the same. Cannabis oil can be used to make marijuana butter, but not all marijuana butter is made from cannabis oil. While nearly anyone with cooking experience can make marijuana-infused oil or butter, making cannabis oil should be left to the chemists, and while weed and cannabis oil are mostly readily available in legal states, pre-made marijuana butter can be hard to find—leaving both legal residents and those getting their bud on the black market in the same boat: making it at home.

Corinne Tobias, a home cook who writes about cooking with cannabis on her blog Wake + Bake, described an experience in which she ate half of an infused grilled cheese sandwich and got “super crazy ridiculously messed up.” She wrote that she felt like she was “melting into the floor” and spent “half of her afternoon” asking for reassurance that she was not dying. “When I first started cooking with cannabis,” she writes, “I had no idea that it was going to be such a struggle to predict the perfect dosage. I’d make oil using the same method, but every time I harvested a different strain, my cannabis oil would be stronger or weaker and I had to spend a day or two as a human guinea pig, slowly testing my oil until I knew it was just right.” Now she is a fan of the tCheck, a $299 home potency tester.


For those who prefer to avoid smoking or vaporizing cannabis, cannabis infused edibles are a great solution. In fact edibles represent one of the fastest growing product categories among medical and recreational dispensaries nationally. Nearly 5 million edible products were sold in Colorado alone in 2014. For those living in less tolerant states, you can make your own edibles at home with surprising ease. In this guide we will cover how to make edibles, how to determine dosage, and why the high associated with edibles feels so strong.
Unless you are working with a cannabis concentrate (like CO2 oil) that is labeled ‘activated’, you will need decarboxylate your starting material to maximize the effect of your edibles. To do so, we recommend preheating your over to approximately 220-225°F. It helps to use an oven thermometer to check the accuracy of your oven; ours ran nearly 20 degrees hotter than it was set! The specific temperature will dictate how long it takes for your starting material to decarboxylate. As you can see on the chart below, it will likely take between 45 and 60 minutes to fully decarb your material at this temperature. If using a different temperature, be sure to adjust your oven time accordingly!
Since I generally like to take microdoses of cannabis (about 10mg or less) throughout the day when I need to medicate, I’ve never really delved into the world of making ridiculously strong cannabis oil or butter. I realize that some people need stronger medicine, but those people aren’t me, and I don’t have the tolerance to test strong oil without getting really really really messed up, so I never did it.

THE WHY This seems to be the step where many recipes differ; some call for butter heated in a crock pot while others call for honey heated on a hot plate…who is right? Nearly all of these recipes will ‘work’; however, our goal is NOT to make oil with the most aggregate THC possible, but rather oil with most amount of available THC for your body to absorb. Thus, we are going to select the best inputs for increased systemic bioavailability i.e. the same amount of THC is absorbed more efficiently and thus feels stronger.

Cannabis has anti inflammatory properties, which when applied in a salve, will prevent your body from rushing to heal the wound. The rush of white blood cells to the injury is the cause of the scar and the anti inflammatory slows that process down. The scar doesn’t form as badly and while it is still there, won’t be as rough when it finally finishes healing.


Grind your marijuana. You want to start with dry marijuana. You may choose to stick with only the flowers. Some people will use all parts of the plant.[4] Keep in mind that you will want to strain your oil later. Try not to grind your pot so finely that it will go through your strainer. A coffee grinder or food processor will work well. Just don't turn your marijuana into powder.
All in all, they’re not so different—but they’re definitely not the same. Cannabis oil can be used to make marijuana butter, but not all marijuana butter is made from cannabis oil. While nearly anyone with cooking experience can make marijuana-infused oil or butter, making cannabis oil should be left to the chemists, and while weed and cannabis oil are mostly readily available in legal states, pre-made marijuana butter can be hard to find—leaving both legal residents and those getting their bud on the black market in the same boat: making it at home.
While historians have found recipes involving weed dating back to 15th century Europe and even 10th century India, pot brownies were introduced to pop (or should we say “pot”?) culture in the 1968 movie “I Love You Alice B. Toklas.” Objectively, the most common way to make weed-laced snacks is marijuana butter, but baking with cannabis oil can be even more effective. While these two products have many similar uses and come from the same plant, they’re produced and used in very different ways.
The recipe for these hemp brownies is extremely easy, not to mention no bake! With only six ingredients to gather up, even the stoniest stoner can pull these off and make them taste amazing! You can store these treats in the fridge or the freezer if you like them chilly. This recipe makes about 9 servings so be ready to indulge in these delicious snacks that also happen to be good for you!
Take the cannabis, lime juice, water, green onion, and the oil and place it in the crock pot. Cook the materials on low for about two hours. Once two hours has gone by, place the apple cider vinegar, soy sauce, tomato paste, chili powder, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, honey, ground ginger, cayenne pepper, and the apricot nectar in to the crockpot with the previously cooked mixture. Mix everything together well and cook on low for another hour at least. Be sure to stir the mixture occasionally. Once the sauce is done cooking, store it in an airtight container in the fridge. The recipe will yield about two cups of sauce and is definitely perfect for your backyard barbecues! Enjoy!
Help! I am looking for a way to use BHO in cooking. I don’t know the ratios. I have made cannabutter many times and made BHO, but I’ve never cooked with it. One ounce of bud to pound of butter and the edibles are good and strong. I have one gram of BHO from the same bud and would love to cook with it. I know it will be so much stronger so I am not sure how to use in a recipe. Your help is appreciated! –Chiefing Chef

Studies show cannabidiol (CBD) has tremendous medical potential, especially in the treatment of seizure disorders and pediatric patients. Indications also suggest CBD lowers blood sugar, which makes it desirable for treating diabetes. Its sedative properties make it useful in the treatment of stress-related and sleep disorders. CBDA and CBD are non-psychoactive. Unlike THCA and THC, converting CBDA to CBD will not make a psychoactive product. CBD has a calming effect. This makes it ideal for treating children, the aged or patients that prefer less psychoactive effects. THC vaporizes quicker than CBD, so decarboxylating higher CBD varieties may produce higher CBD-enriched material. However, if you are not using a high CBD strain, extending the heating process may accomplish no more than burning off the THC.
OK, this one isn’t a mistake as there is more than one way to infuse.  Some people do not like to add water to the mix, but I do.  Especially on the stovetop, the water will help things infuse at a lower temperature and avoid things burning and scorching which will result in unappetizing taste and THC that’s rendered useless by being cooked at too high a temperature. The water also helps with appearance and flavor by washing away some of the green color and strong herbal flavor.  The photo at the right shows marijuana butter made with and without water in the mix and marijuana oil made with and without water.  The same type and amount of marijuana was used for each of the infusions in the exact same amount. In all instances there was a better final yield when using water, and a lighter color and less herbal flavor.  The amount of water is not important, but I always add at least as much water as butter or oil. I do this even when infusing in the slow cooker.  Click to find instructions for how to make marijuana butter and cannabis oil.
If you’re new to preparing food with pot, you might as well start with a cookbook that has the word “easy” in the title. Author Cheri Sicard ran a popular recipe website for years, so it was a natural transition for this marijuana activist to write a cannabis cookbook. The Daily Beast once called her the “Martha Steward of Weed,” and until Stewart herself writes a book — and really, we all know it’s coming — “The Easy Cannabis Cookbook” will do nicely. Sicard thinks marijuana is the “unsung superfood,” and adds it to everything from apple-stuffed pork chops to lemon blueberry scones.
Performing the infusion at 150degF helps get the THCa, CBDa, and the rest of the cannabinoids into the oil. But that temp is too low to break up the THCa into THC and CO2. So I am able to do the decarb during baking. I find a brownie mix that needs 1/2 cup oil (which works for the proportions of ingredients that I use) and bake the brownies at 240degF for 1 hour 10 minues. (The extra 10 minutes just seems to help bake the brownies…but isn’t long enough to affect the decarbing “thermal history”).
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