However, making marijuana butter with concentrate is not the same as using traditional bud. Firstly, depending on how the oil is extracted, the THC can be already activated. This means you can skip the process of heating it up—it’s already ready to be used or ingested. Usually dispensaries can direct you to types of dab that have and haven’t undergone the THC activation process. Second, and perhaps more importantly, cannabis oil is an extremely concentrated (hence the nickname!) form of marijuana and can be much more effective than using regular Mary Jane. A good way to measure a comfortable dose is by simply doing the math. If a gram of cannabis oil is 70 percent THC (dispensaries usually disclose this information on the package), that means it contains 700mg of THC. With 48 teaspoons in one cup of butter, each teaspoon serving would boast 14.5mg of THC if you melted the cannabis oil gram with the butter. Most dispensaries have edibles in individual 10mg THC pieces, which is a great starting point for seeing what is comfortable. Another major difference is flavor: Some types of cannabis oil have intense flavors which carry over to whatever you’re cooking. Pick your concentrate carefully, as it can really affect the taste of the dish.
Seven pieces was not a good idea, says the former nonprofit worker, laughing. She’s come a long way since then, and says the ability to calculate dosage through lab testing is one of the biggest changes in the industry. Prior to laboratory testing, attempting to determine the potency of an edible required guesswork, which could lead to unpredictable results.
To store the mixture, you must first gently uncap the jug (don’t disturb what’s at the bottom) and put the tubing in to the jug, stopping about an inch from the bottom. Siphon the contents through the pipe, into the clean glass jug, through the muslin to make sure that no sediment gets through. You can toss out the old jug, along with the gross mess of stems at the bottom. Cap loosely and leave this jug alone for one month. Don’t move it or shake it. After a month has passed, siphon this jug in to the smaller, clean bottles from before, again through a layer of muslin. Seal them well. But you’re not going to enjoy your wine yet. You have to age it so put the bottles in a dark place and leave them for as long as you possibly can, even as long as six months to get the most out of your wine. After that time period, you should have a great tasting cannabis infused wine! Enjoy!

Are you straining the plant material out of your butter at least? That step alone will improve flavor. What is the HOB sorry not sure what that means? You can cook on the stovetop, but direct heat can present challenges as it is possible to get too hot so make sure the setting is low and you stir often. I would infuse longer than 10 to 15 minutes too for maximum potency and be sure to decarb your plant material first as well. The process of making cannabutter can be lengthy but not difficult. If you use a slow cooker you can set it and forget it. Making a larger batch of butter or oil is also handy as you can keep extra in the freezer to use anytime you want it.


The Cannabis Cookbook is the definitive guide to cooking with the world's most versatile and popular weed. What better way to sample the most popular weed on the planet than by eating it, as people have done for thousands of years? Inside The Cannabis Cookbook are over 35 delicious recipes for Stoned Starters, Mashed Main Courses, Doped-Out Deserts, Bombed-Out Beverages, and Crazy Cocktails to make meals that are both unforgettable and hard to recall.
I am not sure as I do not use lecithin and see no reason to use it when infusing oil as lecithin helps bind water and oil and when infusing coconut oil you are binding fat to fat. I am doing more research into lecithin now and there will be a feature on it soon. There are certain cooking application where I could see it being useful, but for infusing oil and butter, I do not see that it is necessary, unless I uncover something in further research that I haven’t already.
In many states in the US, a single dose of an edible is 10 mg of either THC or CBD – but some medical cannabis products can contain over 100mg of THC. As always, the stronger concentrations are better to work up to slowly, and to work in collaboration with a cannabis-savvy doctor. After testing out a single dose, most medical cannabis patients are recommended to increase in increments of 5 mg until they achieve the desired effects.
Using cannabis as a medicine begins with understanding the basic science of decarboxylation, and why it is a crucial process in making edibles, tinctures and topical treatments. To get the full medicinal value out of your cannabis, it needs to be heated to a temperature that is just not possible to obtain in the human digestive system. The major downside of decarboxylating is that some of the more volatile terpenes (and other aromatics) that give the plant its signature aroma and flavor are lost during the process. Adding an equal amount of raw material to the decarboxylated materials may improve the taste and/or smell of your creations, but learning how to properly decarboxylate cannabis from the get-go will save you a lot of time, energy, money and product when cooking with cannabis.
Cannabis Now contributor Jessica Catalano is another strain-specific chef — in fact, she’s the world’s first. She first started posting recipes on her Ganja Kitchen Revolution blog in 2010, choosing strains based on the complementary flavors they add to non-medicated ingredients. The website inspired a book of the same name, where Catalano recommends adding Blue Cheese to biscuits, Pineapple Kush to a piña colada, and Sour Diesel to a Lebanese tabouli. If you can’t afford the book, Catalano still posts plenty of free recipes to her blog.
Wolf had given me a rundown of the legal-cannabis industry during our drive, dividing it into three broad categories. First are “the black-market people who’re forging on,” the original patchouli-scented pioneers. Then there are the profiteers: venture capitalists and M.B.A. types who’ve been pouring funds into the legalizing states, a phenomenon called the green rush. “These are people who’ve never smoked pot in their lives,” she said, with disapproval. “They’re just in it for the money.” The majority of pot entrepreneurs fall into the vast third category, driven by the complicated blend of motives—ambition, libertinism, a desire to help sick people—that drives the legalization movement as a whole.
Best advice? Don’t ruin food with weed. Eat some cannabutter on a cracker, with some peanut butter if you’re a wimp, then eat your food without the a** taste of weed. And the advice about getting the food too hot is complete nonsense. You smoke weed, vape it, at temperatures far higher than recommended here, and guess what? You get high. Want some oil or butter in 30-40 minutes? As a starter batch, melt 2 sticks of unsalted butter, and add a 1/4 ounce of ground up bud. Cook it medium to medium low, watching for foaming. When it starts foaming, turn it down a bit, and keep taking it off the heat. Once you have the butter at simmer, all the moisture in the weed will bubble out. Once the weed quits foaming, you’re done. Use a strainer to get it into a heat resistant container, and don’t burn your fool self. Let it cool, then put it in the fridge to solidify. Once it’s hardened you can put in a baggie or container so your fridge doesn’t stink like cannabutter. Once you get practiced up, it’s a cinch. No sense jacking around for hours on end when you can get ‘er done in less than an hour. Good luck, and DON’T BURN YOURSELF! And when you test it, go easy, and wait at least 3 hours to make sure you don’t eat too much and make yourself miserable.
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