After bananas are battered, place them in the very hot oil and let them sizzle and get yummy until they turn golden brown in color. Leave them to cool on a plate with 2 paper napkins to soak up any excess oil. Once cooled, add a little more pizazz and sprinkle them with sugar and cinnamon. Or if you’re in the mood to be really naughty, serve with ice cream and indulge yourself in a banana sweet stone.


Melt the cannabis butter in a small saucepan over low heat and blend in remaining ingredients. Stuff the turkey and/or season it with salt and pepper, if desired. Make a small incision in the skin of the turkey. Force a finger through the slit and break the contact between the skin and the meat. Using a meat injector, squirt half the butter mixture under the skin. Cook the turkey according to your favorite method, basting it with the remaining butter mixture every half hour until it’s done. We cooked it on a Traeger grill and it was juicier and more moist than any turkey I have ever had before.
please help me with this confusion. Ideally, decarboxylation takes place at a temperature just over 200 for about just under an hour. This is accomplished in boiling water, which reaches and maintains about 212 degrees. So if I boil the herb at that temp for an hour, isn’t that decarboxylating it? Why do it in the oven first and then do it again in the saucepan? What am I missing?

All of this has produced a new category of cannabis user: people trying it for the first time, to see what the fuss is about, or coming back to it after a decades-long hiatus. Businesspeople see a future in which cannabis is part of a functional, even aspirational life style. Like Julia Child introducing Americans to French cuisine, Wolf serves as both a guide and an ambassador to this world. She was a chef and a food editor for many years, and she stands out as a source of reliable information in a nascent industry without dependable methods for cooking and dosing. Ricardo Baca, the founding editor of the Cannabist, told me, “Laurie represents a voice in the food-and-cannabis space that can be trusted.” Her columns are full of global ingredients and lush food photography meant to attract what she calls “the CB2 and West Elm crowd.” Her books would not seem out of place on the shelf next to the latest tome from the Barefoot Contessa or Yotam Ottolenghi. Evan Senn, the editor of the California-based cannabis magazine Culture, told me that, increasingly, foodies are the target audience for pot. “I love to drink wine, and I’m kind of a snob about it,” she said. “I’m not going to drink Franzia out of a cardboard box. I’m going to buy a nice bottle of Pinot Noir and aerate it and enjoy it. I have the same approach to edibles.”
In 2007, Child folded. The Wolfs decided to move to Oregon, seeking a change of pace. Laurie busied herself with a cookbook, “Portland, Oregon Chef’s Table,” for which she gathered recipes from local chefs. One day, when she was getting her car repaired, she struck up a conversation with a man in the service-station waiting room. “He stuck out his hand and said, ‘I’m Dr. Phil. Not that Dr. Phil. I’m a pot doctor.’ ” Medical marijuana had been legal in Oregon since 1998, and the doctor, Phil Leveque, was one of the state’s first practitioners. Wolf told him about her epilepsy and problems with Tegretol. “He told me, ‘Get off that stuff. It’s poison.’ ” Leveque wrote her a prescription for medical cannabis and instructed her to consume a small amount each morning. She found that it not only controlled her seizures but also stopped the “auras”—feelings of dizziness she’d continued to have on the anti-convulsant. She stopped taking Tegretol, and she hasn’t had a seizure since. “I don’t know if I can say I’m cured, but my symptoms are completely managed,” Wolf said.
I am not sure as I do not use lecithin and see no reason to use it when infusing oil as lecithin helps bind water and oil and when infusing coconut oil you are binding fat to fat. I am doing more research into lecithin now and there will be a feature on it soon. There are certain cooking application where I could see it being useful, but for infusing oil and butter, I do not see that it is necessary, unless I uncover something in further research that I haven’t already.
Yep, you got it! The only difference for me when making topicals is I decarb some of it and leave some undecarbed so I get full spectrum (both THC-A and CBD-A along with THC and CBD). This is optional, but I find it makes the most effective topicals. I am currently at work on a new online course about making cannabis topicals, but you are definitely on the right track.
Combine in your glass jar, 3 ounces of drinking alcohol with your ounce of hash oil, or in a 3:1 ratio, according to the strength of your hash oil.  Seal the mixture and put it in the freezer for 6 or more days, shaking a few times per day.  Now store your tincture in your one ounce eye drop bottles.  Before taking, you should first calculate how much thc each dropper, and each drop holds, according to the strength of the hash oil and how much you’ve used.  This method has the most easy method of consumption.  Use the eye dropper to squirt a measured amount of weed tincture under the tongue, hold for half a minute, then swallow it down.  The thc and other cannabinoids will bring health benefits, but the psychoactive ingredients will have less effect because it may not have been activated by heat.  As with any oral consumption, effects come on slow and then goes stronger for longer.  It is important to make sure you know how much cannabinoids you are consuming, and not to re-dose before the effects take hold, which can take as much as one to two hours.

In a legal state, home cooks have access not only to lab-tested fresh product but sometimes also to lab-tested butters and oils. Some who prefer to infuse at home rely on online potency calculators, of which there are several. Sites like Wikileaf catalog the potency of different strains, and home potency-testing tools are starting to hit the market.
“It depends on if you’re in a state where you can legally access it, or if you’re in a prohibition state,” says McDonough. Most cookbooks and guides provide a way to evaluate the quality of your cannabis and give it a ballpark THC percentage, which will help the home cook calculate it. “It’s better than nothing, but it’s still not very precise,” she says.
Cannabis Oil – Slow Cooker  Method (best choice): Add oil, marijuana plant material, and water to the slow cooker and cook on low for 4 to 8 hours.  I know some cooks who cook their oil for as much as 2 or 3 days in the slow cooker.  Feel free to do so if you choose.  It seems like overkill to me and after having tested longer cooking times, I found no improvement in quality or potency.  In fact, I noticed a stronger herbal flavor and not much else.  You can actually cook for less time, just make sure your mixture has time to come to a full simmer.

Enjoy ur site. I like the mason jar technique. I bought a cold brew coffee filter that inserts into the larger mason jar. Put ur weed into the inside of the strainer filter. Holds a oz or more. Put whatever oil or butter into mason jar with water. For the lid of mason jar I took a skinny nail and made 2 very small holes into the top. Now no need to burp the jar. The build up has a place to escape. Next I put the mason jar into my pot fill it with water enough to come up past my material level …then put my sous vide into the pot. I set my temp at 190 and set my timer for 3 to 6 hours. Does pretty damn good. I do restrain what’s in the filter and run hot water over it. The crock is also a preferred choice. I own a magical butter, a levo…save ur money folks they are glorified crock pots with a hefty price tag.!! Save ur $$ and get yourself some flower or other herb source. The ardent is good, just a little on the small side and the tcheck is also good to have. It takes the guess work out. Also if possible I would like to see a good easy way to infuse chocolate, milk and white and a easy potent hard candy. You do a great job on bringing Info, good solid info to the masses. Today here in Philly I saw on the news they are finally going to put recreational on the table for discussion we do have medical. They are also supposed to discuss reducing sentences for those who have been convicted. Hope to see this soon. Anywho yada…have a great day and keep it coming…
Decarboxylation: Ingesting or cooking with fresh cannabis will not have much of an effect because the THC has to be “activated” with heat. This process is called decarboxylation, or “decarbing.” Typically, THC is decarboxylated before cooking in order to produce the effects of cannabis. It is worth noting that it must be heated slowly in order to retain any product for the cooking process.
When straining cannabis oil after infusing it, go slow and be careful. Cheesecloth is the best strainer to use. It only allows the oil through. However, while many people will then squeeze the remaining oil out of the leaves, be careful. If you squeeze too hard, you will get extra plant material. Instead, be gentle and let gravity do the work for you.
First, take the bud and put it in the coffee grinder, turning it in to a powder. Don’t try to put all of it in at once. Grinding about 7 grams at a time usually works pretty well. Once all of the marijuana is ground up, carefully pour it in. Use a funnel of some sort to make sure that you get all of it. Then, take about 7-8 ice cubes and place them on a washcloth. Fold the top of the washcloth over and hit the cubes with the rubber mallet until they’re almost powder. Pour that in to the milk jug as well. Next, add cold water to the jug, bringing the level of the substance 3/4″ of an inch above where the marijuana level was.

In addition to infusing butter and oil with bud, you can infuse it with kief for a very potent infusion. If you’re not familiar with kief, it’s the sticky bits of resin you see on buds. It has a high concentration of cannabinoids but when cooked, it doesn’t impart the cannabis flavor like using the whole flower. In addition, kief butter needs an even quicker infusion and you don’t need to strain plant matter out of your finished product. Again, because of the high concentration of cannabinoids in kief, this makes a very potent oil so start small with your dosage.
When your cannaoil or cannabutter is done infusing, remove any plant matter by carefully straining it through cheesecloth (available in the cooking section of stores like Target or Walmart) or a coffee filter. Pour your infusion into a container and you’re done! Be sure to put your cannabutter in the fridge to harden, but cannaoils are fine to store on the counter. The most important thing is to keep it in an airtight container (mason jars work great) in a cool, dark space.

Lower the power of the mixer and add in 1 cup of flower, constantly beating, then add 1/2 cup of buttermilk, beating again to make sure that everything is mixing together well. Add in another cup of flour, beating, and then add in the last of the buttermilk, continuously beating. Then add in the remaining flour, pouring it slowly. Continue to beat until the mixture is mixed together well. Remember to get the mix that gets stuck up on the side of the bowl. Grab a stirring instrument and put the beater down. Stir in the lemon juice and lemon zest. Take the mixture and slowly pour it in to the previously greased pan until the pan is three quarters full. Make sure that the batter is even in the pan.


Once your wings have been chilling in the fridge and you’re ready to bake them preheat your oven to *425 degrees. Lightly grease a cookie sheet with olive oil or cooking spray and set aside.  Melt a ½ cup of cannabis butter on low heat. Once your cannabis butter is melted turn heat off and whisk in ½ cup of hot sauce. Separate your hot sauce and cannabis butter mixture equally into 2 separate small bowls and set aside.
Wolf is sometimes called the Martha Stewart of edibles. The designation owes something to superficial similarities. At sixty-two, Wolf resembles a crunchier version of the domestic icon: she has an ample figure, graying hair, and glasses, and she wears loose linen outfits, generally paired with Crocs. But the designation also refers to her role as an educator, schooling people on how best to cook with marijuana. She is the author or co-author of several cookbooks, including “Herb,” which seeks to “elevate the art and science of cooking with cannabis” and “The Medical Marijuana Dispensary,” which features soothing dishes, like stuffed sweet potato, that will get you stoned. Her recipes appear in all the major cannabis publications: High Times, Dope, and Culture, as well as the Cannabist, a Denver Post Web site devoted to the booming legal-marijuana industry. There you can watch her instructional videos on making infused delicacies like the creamy chicken-based Mama Leone’s soup. (“This soup is worth its weight in weed.”)
Take a small pot and add in your cannabis and Everclear. Keep the heat on medium low, at a simmer but never at a boil. This heat will burn off a lot of the alcohol, hopefully allowing you to drink this lemonade without getting hammered. The alcohol is in the recipe in order to extract the THC from the cannabis. After you have brought the cannabis and alcohol up to the right temp, add in half of the glass of water. The mixture should cook until about half of it is evaporated. Then, strain the mixture through cheese cloth to remove any leftover cannabis sediment. Be sure to squeeze the cheesecloth out to make sure that you get all of the trapped liquid. Then, you can add in the rest of the water, freshly squeezed lemon juice, and sugar as you see fit. Store this drink in the fridge! Enjoy!
Because cooks use cannabis for its chemical effects, not just as a seasoning, a field of homespun, and increasingly more professional, technology has grown around it. Techniques for refining the plant matter into usable and potent ingredients range from stovetop simple to serious industrial processing—all in the quest to make bioavailable, accurately dosed dishes that also taste good.
Many different extraction methods are detailed, including cannabutter, vegetable oils, and even nut butters. The thing that makes this cookbook really unique is the dosing chart, which allows you to find exactly the right dose while you are cooking and measuring out your cannabis infused oils. This means no more surprises and doses that you can customize for your particular needs.
SInce I have no t lab tested after using the Ardent Lyft, I can’t say for sure how well it works, but mine seems to work fine. It does take longer than what I typically do in the oven, but it seems to work. I have no idea what the tcheck device is, but I do know that home testing is wildly inaccurate (so much so as to be useless), so don’t know as you should much stock in the 0% cause that does not seem right. I use trim all the time, it’s great economical cooking material. Using trim should not be an issue at all. The slow cooker, with water added, is my personal favorite way of infusing oil or butter. Hope this helps.
It seems like there’s a Marley family member in every branch of the weed industry, and food is no exception. Bob’s eldest daughter, Cedella, is the author of “Cooking with Herb,” a cookbook focused on how the health benefits of cannabis can benefit a holistic lifestyle, whether it’s eaten or consumed in some other way. True to the family’s Jamaican roots, the book is full of Caribbean recipes for dishes like saltfish, jerk chicken and spicy Jamaican patties. But it’s not just a cookbook; Cedella’s volume also features wellness tips and directions for making your own beauty products.
Mary only recently told her family in Oklahoma about the new turn in her career. “I was so nervous,” she said. “I felt like I was coming out to them.” She was surprised to learn that they were curious about the medical uses of cannabis. One relative, who has chronic pain, started taking a Laurie & MaryJane brownie instead of painkillers to help him sleep. (He got his doctor’s approval.) Another uses their infused coconut oil to treat his aging dog’s epilepsy. (He mixes it with dog food.)
Take the orange juice concentrate, kief/hash, milk, vanilla, and sugar in to a blender. Puree the mixture until it is smooth, with a bit of froth at the top. Gradually add in the ice cubes, continuing to puree in the blender. The drink should be a smoothie like consistence, thick but not like ice cream thick. Pour in to a container and serve. Remember, the amount of kief/hash given is only an estimate. You can use more or less depending on your tolerance and personal preference. Please also remember that ingesting marijuana this way effects people differently than others and if new to edible cannabis, try smaller amounts and gradually increase as you know how it effects you.

Super Baked Cannabis Buffalo Wings are on point for every stoner. A great addition for any party! The prep time is really only 15 minutes. Cannabis Buffalo Wings do have to be refrigerated for at least one hour so the flour coating gets firm before baking them. We like to prep them the night before and refrigerate them over night. If you like your wings really spicy you can always add more cayenne pepper to the dry mixture and/or use a spicier hot sauce. Enjoy!
Strain the oil.[5] Do this while the oil is still hot for best results. You can strain the oil using a wire strainer to remove the larger pieces of marijuana. If you still have solids you want to get rid of, strain a second time through a coffee strainer. This will take a lot of time so be careful and patient. You may want to do small batches while you continue to simmer the mixture.
The first chapter of the book is the basic recipes, such as THC oil, cannabutter, tinctures, glycerites, marijuana flour, etc. This is the most important and most useful section of the book. Much like the five French mother sauces, once you've figured out how to make these base items, the rest of the book is pretty much the same as any other cookbook. In fact, you could probably adapt just about anything you'd find in the Joy of Cooking by replacing the oil or butter with an infused version.
The Bitchin’ Kitchen’s tenants represented a cross-section of this world. There was a businessman who had raised venture-capital funds to start a candy operation, and a married couple from Ohio who had saved their money and moved to Oregon to start a strain-specific cookie company called Titan’s Kind. Then there was the facility’s owner, a no-nonsense middle-aged woman named Nancy Jones, who started out as a living-room farmer with six plants. “I’ve been growing for nineteen years,” she told me. She is now involved in several enterprises, including Badass Dabs, which makes concentrates and extracts. She handed me a sample of her newest product: a vaginal suppository, which treats pain from menstrual cramps or endometriosis. It looked like a large vitamin. “It’s fifty milligrams of THC, seven milligrams of CBD, and coconut oil and beeswax. All organic,” she said.
The recipes in this book are quite different than what I was expecting, but are delicious nonetheless. The instructions for making cannabutter/ghee and cannaflour are very useful, though in practice not always as easy as stated. All the recipes are very easily adapted to exclude the cannabis, and are very good on their own. Many recipes call for adding fresh pot to the dish (e.g. tossing ground buds into a salad, or stirring some into guacamole), and the taste can be quite strong. This cookbook isn't for someone just looking for brownie and cookie recipes. Many dishes included are somewhat labour intensive, but are certainly beneficial for medicinal marijuana patients looking to maintain a steady level of THC in their bodies, as the book contains recipes for any time of day. I would suggest trying a recipe out first without the pot, to work out any kinks. The recipes are meant to replace smoking marijuana (as that was the author's goal), so the proportions might seem a bit staggering at first. It's hard to watch 1/4 oz. get turned into hot chocolate, but that's why I suggest trying the recipes out pot-free first. It's easier than wasting good bud on a dish you don't like. All in all, it's a good cookbook, with well-thought-out recipes, and many interesting facts about cannabis and the people who've made history in the world of pot.

Put the half-and-half, cannamilk, cornstarch, salt, and sugar in to a large saucepan and whisk everything together thoroughly. Cook the mixture over medium heat while constantly stirring until it starts to thicken, about ten minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and set it aside. In a seperate container, whisk together the eggs and gradually add in a cup of the cannacream from the saucepan. Place the hot cannacream and to yolk mixture in to the saucepan and continue to whisk it constantly.
So to take the taste out, you basically have to extract as much of that stuff as possible by soaking the bud for a couple of days in distilled water, and then after that, blanching it. By blanching, you're basically getting a much purer flower to start with and later to infuse into your butter or oil. It's still going to smell like cannabis, but if you cook with it, you won't taste anything. Most canna-butters are usually green or even black. Mine is yellow.
“My parents were a great introduction to the rest of the world, basically,” says Sayegh, who hopes that finely prepared food combined with the capacity to discuss the molecular structure of cannabis will help strip away the stigma of a plant still federally classified alongside heroin as a Schedule I drug. Far from a scourge, Sayegh and others see immense medical and economic potential in the herb.

While some purists will tell you this is hearsay, adding water to your infusing process is a nifty trick. This way, you can infuse at a lower temperature. The amount of water you add is not important, but try to use at least as much water as oil or butter. The water boils off. You can also see the difference in your “washed” end product. It is not as green.
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