How to make Marinated Mushrooms with Marijuana! This is really exciting, and these mushrooms can be served with rice, fish, cut up in soups, or eaten alone and can add some much needed flare to your meal. Being that mushrooms are so diverse, there’s really no limit to what you can do with these and they also would make a great topping on pizza. You can think of these guys as a much more tasty, much more milder form of psychedelic mushrooms. Now that you’re more than eager to have a taste, let’s cook some!
First, add in the flour, baking soda, and spices. Sift them together well. Take a mixer and beat the butter and sugar together until fluffy. Use something electric for this so you don’t hurt yourself. Add in the eggs and the molasses after that. Slowly add in the flour and separate the dough three times. Wrap each one in plastic wrap and put in the fridge for an hour.
Marijuana is oil-based, so knowing this is very important when it comes to cooking with cannabis. THC is the pyschoactive property in Marijuana and is contained in the capitate glands that cover its leaves, but the flowers / marijuana buds contain the most THC. When cooking or baking with marijuana, you should always use an oil-based product, such as butter or vegetable oil, as these do a great job at dissolving the capitate glands and releasing the THC. There are a few basic ways of using the cannabis plant for cooking: one is to make butter aka cannabutter and the other is to make flour. Another way is to make Marijuana Alcohol, which you can learn about in our marijuana beverages section. Either way you choose to make your marijuana induced foods requires the use of either the cannabis plant leaves and clippings or using the finished marijuana buds, which is my preference as it is by far the most potent way of making Weed Butter (Cannabutter). You can cook with cannaoil in any recipe that calls for oil.

Substitute your marijuana flour for a portion of your recipe's requirement. Generally you are looking at about a 10% substitution but as much as 20% may be ok.[15] This is especially true for baked good that must rise such as breads. Unlike using infused butter or oil, marijuana flour is a true substitution. Marijuana flour doesn't act quite the same as regular flour.


A friend lab tested a batch of brownies that had plain kief stirred into the batter as opposed to kief that had been first decarboxylated.  He found the latter to be about 30% more potent.  It’s easy to do, just put your kief or hash in an oven proof dish and heat for about 20 minutes at 250 degrees F.  Remove from oven, cool and you are ready to use for cooking.
Hukill called 2.8 milligrams “perfect for a beginner,” adding that marijuana edibles are not meant to be consumed en masse. In other words, when you ingest edibles and get the munchies, reach for something else. Another tip: Remember that cannabis-infused foods take longer to get into your system compared to smoking or vaping. Give time for the high to hit.
Cooking is a huge part of the holidays for most people. The main course is definitely important but what would that be without those delicious added bonus foods? Side dishes are always very important for the holiday meals. Everyone knows that mashed potatoes are probably the best part of any holiday. Take, for example, these mashed grapefruit sweet potatoes that also happen to be medicated. They taste good and get you high. With a very simple recipe (on a scale of 1 to 10, we give it about a 3), these sweet potatoes will be a hit at at any table this holiday season.
The hash oil you purchased has very high concentrations of CBD, or cannabidiol which, as a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, has demonstrated health benefits as a nutritional antioxidant, neuroprotector, and anti-inflammatory supplement. CBD attaches to receptors associated exclusively with inflammation and not receptors associated with euphoria. Thus, CBD does not get users “high”.

Edibles are steadily gaining popularity in North America but are currently illegal for purchase or distribution here in Canada. Until the government adds edibles to the list of what can be sold, making your own is a simple and legal option. Edibles are foods that incorporate cannabis through cooking or baking and can be made at home through a variety of methods, including using traditional dried flower, our Maker’s Mix products or the Emblem Cannabis Oils.
Cooking with premade concentrates is also an art that takes a little practice to get right. Cooking with kief is fun and easy. Its fine texture dissolves almost instantly in liquids and fats, sometimes even at room temperature. Hash, however, will take a little preparation, and this also depends on its consistency. Dry hash can be put in a food processor to grind it. The sticky variety needs to be heated until it melts.

Because cooks use cannabis for its chemical effects, not just as a seasoning, a field of homespun, and increasingly more professional, technology has grown around it. Techniques for refining the plant matter into usable and potent ingredients range from stovetop simple to serious industrial processing—all in the quest to make bioavailable, accurately dosed dishes that also taste good.
I’ve found that doing a dry ice resin gland extraction on my plant matter gives me all of the great benefits I’m seeking with zero flavor of cannabis in my edibles. You can cook it into whatever oil you choose, I prefer coconut for it saturated fat which attaches to the CBDs best, and the entire process takes about the same 75 minutes, start to finish. Theonly addition is the 2# of dry ice (~$4) per 1/8-1/4# of trimmed plant matter.

Cannaoil in your smoothie? Yes! Due to its reputation as a superfood and the creamy texture that results from blending coconut oil, it has become a popular addition to smoothies. There are a lot of recipes out there but you can experiment by adding a tablespoon of cannabis coconut oil or less if your infusion is strong (5-10 mg is a good starting point) to your favorite smoothie recipe.
When making your own edibles using dried flower, you first have to grind the cannabis flowers and bake them. If you’re making your own canna oil or butter, the recipe always starts with cooking the dried flower in the oven before it can be steeped in the oil. This heating process—whether it happens through a portable vaporizer or your kitchen’s oven—is called decarboxylation. In addition, accessory products like the LEVO and the Magical Butter Maker can help simplify the process.
Burgers are definitely popular in the stoner community. The amount of In-N-Out Burger photos that permeate stoner Instagrams is out of control. Whether you’re eating your home made bud burgers or going to grab fast food, you can’t really go wrong with a burger. Even if you don’t eat meat, you have the option to eat veggie burgers. Now, medicated burgers can be the favorite of stoners all over the world. I hope that you enjoy this cannabis leaf/butter burger and that it keeps you flying all day!

Depending on how many baked goods you’d like to make, it should be somewhat easy to divide it up accordingly, once you’ve determined how many mgs of THC you have in your batch. The maximum legal amount in recreationally available edibles ranges from 5mg to 20mg per edible, depending on state law, however you’re not bound by these limitations. If you’re not sure about your perfect dose or are inexperienced with edibles, 3-5 mgs would be a good starting point.
You deserve better than a limp joint and leftover pad Thai eaten by the light of the fridge. Live a little. Take that ganja and infuse it into butter, oil, milk, and sugar, and fuck around a bit. We're not talking boxed brownie mix; we're talking about a full-fledged gastronomical ball-out—apps, entrees, desserts, even some cocktails—that'll get you high and appease your munchies. Two birds, one stoner.
Funny is relative. Funny rotten, throw it out. Funny like weed strain and use. Did you use water, if so this would increase chances of something growing that you don’t want in there. If it is just oil and cannabis and the cannabis in submerged, you might be OK. If you stored it in the fridge, you should be fine either way. I could not tell for sure unless I saw and smelled it. But when in doubt, my motto is always to toss it out. Sorry.
What could be better then enjoying your summer nights with this dish? For those of you who love fish dishes in the summer, this recipe will be for you! This amazing dish is easy to prepare and will give you an amazing medicated salmon that your friends will absolutely adore. The following recipe will make four servings so if you plan on making it for more or less, be sure to adjust the ingredients accordingly.
With 4/20 around the corner and more legalized recreational marijuana than ever before, both heavy stoners and first-time tokers are asking the same question when it comes to weed in the kitchen: What is the difference between cannabis oil and marijuana butter? While they do have a lot of similarities, confusing the two can have serious consequences—getting uncomfortably stoned, ruining a pan, or even wasting your weed. To truly understand their unique and similar qualities, we need to look at how they’re made, how they’re used, and where you can get them.
Also, if you do plan on straining the milk, you can save what gets taken out of the mix and dry it. Store this mixture to use in edibles later! It’s always nice to have a recipe that reuses ingredients more than once, making sure to get as much benefit as possible from everything. This milk can also be flavored with all kinds of natural flavors! For this season, cinnamon would be absolutely perfect. Of course, try out a bunch and pick your favorite! Enjoy your healthy, delicious hempseed milk!
Nick and Mary eventually decided to follow his parents to Portland, where Mary began helping her mother-in-law with the company. She created a Facebook page and designed the logo, coming up with a whisk-and-marijuana-leaf motif. Before long, Mary told me, “I realized we could have a real business.” She and Wolf are an unlikely pair. In contrast to Wolf’s bohemian vibe, Mary exudes wholesomeness. She has short blond hair and rosy cheeks. “I call us Beauty and Obese,” Wolf said. In cooking videos on the Cannabist, they have an “Absolutely Fabulous” dynamic. When Mary says, “We’re going to mix it all into the pot, and it’s going to be delicious,” her mother-in-law exclaims, “Ha-ha. You said ‘pot!’ ” But their skills appear to be well matched. Wolf is the right-brain person, dreaming up recipe ideas, while Mary oversees the left-brain tasks, navigating Oregon’s complicated regulatory requirements.
Cannabis infused butter, otherwise known as cannabutter, is a primary ingredient in many marijuana-infused recipes. Cannabis butter is technically an ‘extraction’ method whereby the cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are extracted from the cannabis plant and infused into the butter fats. The butter from a normal recipe is then substituted with cannabutter to produce psychoactive effects. Cannabis butter is often used in decadent edible recipes (such as brownies), but ultimately its use depends on the cook and his/her personal preferences and/or their dietary needs. It can be made from dried or decarboxylated cannabis buds, trim, solvent-less hash or even sugar leaf.
 Next, fill a large pan with the vegetable oil and let that get nice and hot. Remember to be careful when handling hot oi,l it has a tendancy to be mean and pop around when it’s hot. You’ll know the oil is the right temperature if you put a small drop of batter in, and it starts to sizzle and turn brown, now it’s ready to start cooking your special bananas.

Generally speaking, lower cooking temperatures are better. THC is completely degraded at temperatures in excess of 392 degrees F although it starts to break down long before that. Since water boiling never gets above 212 degrees F, I always recommend adding water when making cannabis infusions (see point 2 above).  You will also need to pay attention to cooking temperatures when using the infused butter and oils, or when cooking with marijuana concentrates. Do not use infused marijuana oils for direct sautéing for frying. If you are making something battered, make sure the medicated part is inside the batter. You can cook at oven temperatures up to 375 degrees F, as the food itself will not get that hot.

For those who prefer to avoid smoking or vaporizing cannabis, cannabis infused edibles are a great solution. In fact edibles represent one of the fastest growing product categories among medical and recreational dispensaries nationally. Nearly 5 million edible products were sold in Colorado alone in 2014. For those living in less tolerant states, you can make your own edibles at home with surprising ease. In this guide we will cover how to make edibles, how to determine dosage, and why the high associated with edibles feels so strong.
How to make Marinated Chicken Legs with Marijuana… Stoner life isn’t all about snack,s and we do know how to enjoy a well cooked savory meal. Chicken is the bomb, and pretty much everyone on the planet agrees, but chicken that gets you high; whoa!  This recipe is a weed smokers dream meal. The marinade is delicious and penetrates through the chicken legs to give you a burst of moist chicken flavor in every bite. Grab a leg and eat it alone, or serve with your favorite side for complete satisfaction.
Remove from oven and allow to cool fully before removing the foil. Depending on the material you use, it may be fine enough and require no further processing. If not, you can place the material in a food processor or blender, pulsing the cannabis until it is coarsely ground. Be careful not to over grind the material, as you do not want a super fine powder.
I messed up a batch. I’m hoping I can save it. I have a MB2 machine, but I didn’t have enough “stuff” (butter and buds) to get the the minimum fill line on there. So I added water to the minimum fill line. I also added some lecithin. Now I have a watery, sludgey mess. Can I put it in the oven at like 220 and evaporate the water, or is the whole batch jacked?

Last fall, the food writer Laurie Wolf invited me to a dinner party at her home. It promised to be a master class in rustic entertaining. Wolf lives in a floating house on the Willamette River, just south of Portland, Oregon. When she has people over, she told me, she has a few rules for herself. First, “have as much done in advance as possible.” She goes so far as to set the table the night before and put out serving platters with sticky notes assigning their contents. Next, be sure to check your guests’ dietary requirements. These days, everybody has a health concern or a food allergy, and she says, “I always try to accommodate in a big way.” Some of Wolf’s recommendations are more esoteric. For example: “Start with a sativa and end with an indica.” This applies only to Wolf’s area of expertise: marijuana edibles.
Nobody can deny that the combination of kush and OJ is the perfect way to start your day. Not everyone is a coffee drinker, after all. Plus, orange juice is better for you anyway. The following recipe will allow you to create an awesome orange drink that you can bring with you on a hot day as a nice medicated smoothie or you can drink it with your bowl of cereal as an awesome wake and bake. Whatever you choose to do, this drink is absolutely amazing… And medicated.
 Now add the chedder cheese and salt whille still mixing everything together until the cheese is fully melted and everything is combined. If you choose to use the Optional Spice , cut the maters and jalapeno chili into small squares and stir into cheese. Pour into a dish of your choice, grab the chips, and find the best spot on the couch because you’re in the zone.
Start off by grinding up the rosin chips in the coffee grinder until they are a fine powder in the coffee grinder. Set them aside and take a measuring cup and scoop the coconut oil in to it. Put the measuring cup with the coconut oil in the microwave and heat it slowly until the oil is a liquid. Measure out your required amount (I believe you will need 1 1/3 cups total for the two boxes) and pour it in to a pot. Add in the rosin chips and let the mixture simmer for about half an hour to forty five minutes, stirring occasionally. Make sure to keep the heat low. If the mixture is bubbling a lot, it’s too hot. After the time is up on the canna-coconut oil, you need to strain the mixture through cheesecloth to extract the plant matter. Over a bowl, strain the oil in the cheesecloth (be sure that you squeeze the cloth to make sure that you get all of the oil) and mix up the brownie batter following the instructions on the box. Finish cooking them according to the brownie instructions. Once they are done cooking in the oven, you will have some extremely potent and incredibly delicious coconut-canna-brownies made with recycled rosin chips! Enjoy!
If you have the luxury of being able to obtain your medicine from a legal dispensary near you, you may have noticed the large selection of edibles that are beginning to overflow the shelves. These pre-made, pre-packaged cannabis infused treats are more accessible to patients nowadays than ever before, but unfortunately many edibles still come packed with sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and other unhealthy ingredients. While these processed food delights can be an easy way to get medicated on the go, many medical marijuana patients prefer making their own medicated snacks and infused meals — and for good reason. Join us as we explore all of the popular cannabis cooking techniques and become a master chef in no time!

Conceptually, the process of making edibles is very similar to that of cannabis concentrates; the goal being a pure, therapeutic combination of cannabinoids and terpenes. The primary difference is that edibles typically utilize a food-grade solvent like coconut oil (or another fatty substance) as opposed to a hydrocarbon like butane to extract the cannabinoids from the starting material. There are literally hundreds of ways to make edibles, and most of them will ‘work’ to some degree. However, what really makes this recipe so effective is the increased bioavailability of the cannabinoids – in essence, how easy it is for your body to absorb the THC, CBD and other beneficial compounds.
 Using a piece of paper, make a funnel so that the process of pouring the marijunana in the olive-oil goes smooth and you don’t spill or waste any herb. Begin pouring the ground reefer into your funnel. Something like a toothpick would be a good tool to help guide the MJ down the funnel. The amount of weed you use will determine the potency of the oil, so go for the gusto.

How to Make Infused Coconut Oil Making cannabis-infused coconut oil is as simple as steeping quality herb in a quality oil. Machines are available to make cannabis-infused coconut oil, but the infusion process can be done right on a stovetop or hot plate with the help of a double boiler. What You Will Need Double boiler (you can make one if you don’t own one) ¼ to ½ ounce of cannabis 1 cup of coconut oil (organic, expeller-pressed works best for this process) 2-3 feet of cooking twine (a clean unused white shoestring will work in a pinch) Cheesecloth (about an 8” x 10” piece) TIP: A ratio of one quarter ounce of cannabis to one cup of oil is a good starting point. If you want a potent oil, high-quality flower (15%+ THC) works well. However, until you become more comfortable with the process or if you have limited funds, using shake, trim and/or kief work fine (avoid stems and seeds). Cooking Directions Prepare the “herb packet”: Lay the cheese cloth out flat Place the cannabis (breaking up larger pieces) into the middle and distribute evenly over a small area (remember the packet needs to fit into the top pan) Fold in opposite ends to cover the herb Now fold in one of the open ends, tuck and roll Tie the roll of herb tightly with cooking twine (tying a knot in one end and then guiding the twine through it works good) Fill the bottom pan of a double boiler with a few inches of water (allowing enough space so that it does not touch the top pan) and set the shallow pan on top. Place over medium heat to a gentle boil - NOT a rolling boil. Add 1 cup of coconut oil to the top pan. When the coconut oil is almost melted, add about 1 cup of water so that the liquid will cover the herb packet [Note: Coconut oil is nonpolar and water is polar so they will naturally separate when chilled; and THC and CBD are not soluble in water, but are in certain carrier oils. Therefore, the coconut oil acts as the carrier and will “soak” up the cannabinoids, leaving any impurities in the water.] Continue heating the oil and water mixture until all of the coconut oil is melted and then add the herb packet - pressing down gently into the liquid using a metal spoon. Cover and leave to cook for 90 minutes, checking back every half hour or so to flip over the packet and stir it around gently. Also, check the water in the bottom pan to make sure it is not boiling too hard and that the water level is still good - be careful to avoid any escaping steam when removing the top pan. After 90 minutes, the oil and water mixture should be a deep green color. At this point, turn off the heat and remove the herb packet and place in a bowl. Squeeze out any oil that is trapped in the “herb packet” by pressing with a spoon (when it cools down, you can give it another squeeze by hand to get every drop). Add this to the liquid mixture and place in the refrigerator to cool. When the mixture is cooled, the water and oil separate (dirty looking water on the bottom and a nice green color solidified oil containing the good stuff on top). Gently poke 2 or 3 holes through the oil, turn over (holding your hand gently over the oil) and drain the water off. If you are not going to use the oil immediately, store in a container (glass preferred) and label with date, strain and ratio. This will help you determine which strains and in what quantities work best for you. The most important thing to remember is that the effects of consuming cannabis-infused coconut oil (directly or as an ingredient in a cooked dish) are usually slow-acting due to the cannabinoids having to be digested first. As such, it may take up to three (3) hours for you to feel its maximum effects, and those effects could last for awhile. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed or concerned about overdosing, don’t panic -- no one has ever died as a direct result of consuming cannabis. Choosing the Right Strain Your next choice will be determining what strain(s) of cannabis to use. The infusion process does not drastically change the effects or flavors of the variety of cannabis used. Therefore, you will want to use a cannabis strain that delivers the desired effects you want to achieve (indica, sativa, hybrid, high-CBD). Most importantly, you want to be sure that the cannabis you use is free from impurities (such as mold, fungus, bugs, and pesticides). If the cannabis is compromised, the infusion process will not correct it. Cooking Temperatures Cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are all affected differently by heat. A double boiler traps steam between the pans (provided you have a good seal) and remains steady about 212° F. The most volatile terpenes will start to evaporate around 70° F (filling the air with a pungent aroma). A majority of the remaining terpenes will begin to evaporate rapidly around 100° F. The boiling points of flavonoids range between 273.2° and 352.4° F, so the dominant flavors of the strain you use should still be evident in the infused oil. Cannabinoids, specifically THC and CBD, exist in acidic and activated forms. In the plant, these cannabinoids exist almost entirely in the acidic form and are known as THCA and CBDA. When heated, these acidic forms undergo a chemical reaction called decarboxylation that results in THCA converting to THC and CBDA converting to CBD. Complete activation occurs when heated to 220° F for 90 minutes. In theory, the double boiler cooks at 212° F, but many factors can change that number, so you may need to experiment by adding or subtracting a few minutes to achieve your desired effects. Remember, if you are going to use the oil in a recipe that will expose it to further heat, you don’t want it to be fully activated at this stage. Further, coconut oil has an average smoking point of 350° F, and can be very tricky to cook on direct heat. A double boiler cooks by steam so the oil doesn’t burn easily. Overcooking the oil compromises the fats and the taste will be most unappealing. If this happens, all you can do is throw it out, wipe the pan clean, and start over. Health Benefits Cannabis and coconut oil are what some would call the perfect pair. Coupling coconut oil, “a vegan-friendly super food,” with cannabis, “nature’s miracle plant,” makes a lot of sense. Coconut oil is a saturated oil made primarily of medium-chain fatty acids. It is safe to ingest in edible form and is easily digested. It gets its extra punch from lauric acid (C12), which comprises about 50% of the total fatty acids, and has been linked to many health benefits: reducing abdominal obesity, accelerating healing time for wounds, delivering antioxidant properties, lowering lipid components (e.g. cholesterol, triglycerides), preventing bone loss and more. Some people even use coconut oil as a daily detox. Saturated fats have gotten a bad rap for decades. They have been accused of contributing to high cholesterol, heart disease, obesity, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Much confusion and contradictory evidence exists on the subject, even among health care professionals. Professionals, like Dr. Aseem Malhotra, are trying to set the record straight. Dr. Malhotra gained attention after the publication of his peer-reviewed editorial in the 2013 British Medical Journal (BMJ), wherein he seriously challenged the conventional view on saturated fats, and found no significant association between saturated fat and cardiovascular risk. Coconut Oil Uses There are so many things you can do with cannabis infused coconut oil including: Drizzle over hot cooked pastas, grains, cereals and vegetables Great for sauces and dressings Add to hot cooked soups and stews Use as a poultry rub Pan fry foods like scrambled egg, fish, bananas, chicken Put a spoonful in your coffee, tea or hot chocolate Add to smoothies Types of Coconut Oil Organic, virgin (or extra-virgin), raw, unrefined, centrifuged and cold-pressed are all terms you want to look for when selecting a coconut oil for ingesting with no cooking or for use in low-heat cooking. These oils typically deliver a strong coconut flavor. Organic, refined, expeller-pressed and solvent-free are the terms you are looking for when selecting an oil for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, especially when using higher temperatures. These refined oils also tend to have a lighter coconut flavor. Virgin Oil: Unrefined / Centrifuged Oil True virgin oil is a centrifuged coconut oil produced without using heat. It is considered one of the highest quality oils, but also one of the most expensive coconut oils on the market today. Terms like raw, pure and unrefined are associated with virgin oils. Virgin coconut oil has a more distinct coconut flavor. It is considered by most to be extremely mild and smooth, and can be eaten right off a spoon. Producing high-quality virgin oil is timely and expensive. Using a machine (centrifuge) cooled by chilled water, coconut cream is produced from pressing the fresh, white meat of the coconut and then concentrating it to yield more and more oil while the proteins and water soluble constituents are separated out and more of the phytonutrients are preserved. Unlike olive oil and some of the other oils, there are no standards to be met in the coconut oil industry to claim extra-virgin status. It is mostly a buzz word used for marketing. Cold-pressed Oils Cold-pressed coconut oils are also often referred to as raw or unrefined. The extraction method used to produce these oils is very similar to the centrifuged method used to make virgin coconut oils. The cold-pressing method however uses a drying process, which can be accomplished using varying degrees of heat. Therefore, very few cold-pressed oils are truly virgin oils. The method of drying and amount of heat used will determine the quality and taste of the coconut oil. Oils processed at high temperatures may taste of toasted coconut, while those processed at lower temperatures tend to deliver more of a mild, raw coconut flavor. If the oil was poorly processed, it may exhibit burnt or rancid qualities. Refined or RBD Coconut Oils Most coconut oils available on the market today are refined or RBD (refined, bleached and deodorized). If a label doesn’t say it is otherwise, then it is most likely refined. These are typically the least expensive of all coconut oils. Refined coconut oil should deliver a light, delicate flavor. The refining process strips away some of the nutrients, but it doesn’t have to alter other attributes of the coconut oil (such as fatty acid profile, taste, aroma). The methods for producing refined oils varies significantly, and can be accomplished with or without harsh solvents (like lye or hexane). If a product doesn’t say it is solvent free, it is a safe bet it was chemically processed and you should avoid it. Otherwise, RBD oils are fine to use, especially for cooking. Bleaching simply refers to the filtering process to remove impurities and is generally not a chemical process. Organic usually signifies that no harsh chemicals or solvents were used in the production. Expeller-pressed Extraction Method The expeller-pressed extraction method is used to produce RBD oils. During production the coconut meat is dried (most often by sun or smoke) and then pressed in large expeller presses. The resulting coconut oil is crude and must be refined or cleaned to minimize free fatty acids, remove remaining moisture, and minimize bad flavors or aromas. Expeller-pressed coconut oils can be a good option if you do not want to pay the premium for virgin oils. They are also a good option for those who do not like the taste of coconuts, or don’t want a strong coconut flavor for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, certain foods. Just be certain that no chemicals or solvents were used in the process. MCT Oil Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are a form of saturated fatty acid that has numerous health benefits. Coconut oil is one great source of MCTs. Roughly 65% of the fatty acids in coconut oil are medium-chain triglycerides. There are four kinds of MCTs: caproic (C6), caprylic (C8), capric (C10) and lauric (C12) acids. Generally speaking, the shorter the chain (meaning the lower the number of carbons the acid has), the faster the body can turn the fatty acids into ketones (usable energy). MCT oil is not an oil found in nature, but is instead manufactured by machine. The fatty acids are extracted through an industrial process of fractionation and concentrated into MCT oil. The logic is that since MCTs are healthy, the more the better. However, lauric acid (C12) is totally void, or present only in minuscule amounts in MCT oil. This has caused much debate on the matter. One side argues that MCT oils don’t include lauric acid because it is rare and more costly to include, and the other side argues that C12 is a less efficient way to obtain energy and adds nothing extra to the product. MCT oil makers advocate using only C8 and C10 (or 100% of one or the other) because they are the most rapidly metabolized for energy. Choosing between coconut oil and MCT oil, or deciding which one is better, should not be a concern when you understand the differences. On one hand, coconut oil is high in lauric acid which has well-documented health benefits, and MCT oil has very little to offer in that way. On the other hand, MCT oil may help raise energy levels better than coconut oil, but little proof is available to validate this claim. If you do plan to use an MCT oil, be sure the label clearly lists the ingredients and discloses how it was produced. Many MCT oils are chemically altered and contain unhealthy fillers like polyunsaturated fats, and due to their refining process may use harsh solvents and chemicals in manufacturing. Storage and Shelf-Life Be sure to keep the infused oil in a container with a tight lid (insects and critters love it). A glass jar with a wide mouth works well so that you can scoop it out easily. The infused oil should be kept out of direct sunlight. It can be refrigerated, but it is not necessary. It can also be frozen, but freezing it will change the taste - sometimes for the better but sometimes for the worse. Coconut oil is very stable and depending on the kind, can last anywhere from 18 months to several years. Opinions differ on how long cannabis-infused oil can be kept. Most agree that degradation begins after 2-3 months, and sooner after repeated exposure to air (opening and shutting the jar) or overexposure to sunlight or heat. This does not mean it is unusable, but you will definitely start to notice a change in the taste and effectiveness as the cannabinoids begin to degrade.
Remove the dough from the food processor and wrap it in plastic. Place the dough in the refrigerator until it is cold all the way through. Get a cookie sheet and grease it with some cooking spray, then roll the dough out on the tray so that it covers the whole pan. Next, you can either use a Goldfish cookie cutter or one of your choosing (I know that they make weed shaped ones, even though the crackers will be orange). These crackers are delicious. Plus, since they’re medicated, they make a good middle-of-your-shift snack if you’re having a rough day at work. Or they’re good to munch on while watching a movie. I highly suggest that you try these crackers if you’re feeling up to baking one day. Not only that, but since you’ll have leftover dough, you can make smaller, shapeless crackers that are also medicated.
When making your own edibles using dried flower, you first have to grind the cannabis flowers and bake them. If you’re making your own canna oil or butter, the recipe always starts with cooking the dried flower in the oven before it can be steeped in the oil. This heating process—whether it happens through a portable vaporizer or your kitchen’s oven—is called decarboxylation. In addition, accessory products like the LEVO and the Magical Butter Maker can help simplify the process.
Then, take the tahini, garlic, lemon juice, beans, and cumin to a food processor and grind everything in to a paste. Then, slowly add in your oil, blending the mixture occasionally. Once you’ve added your satisfactory amount of THC oil, you can top the hummus with salt and pepper to taste if you’d like. This delicious and healthy snack is great for pita dipping, chips, or to take the place of mayonnaise in sandwiches. You’ll get a much more intense flavor without the added fat. Enjoy your hummus!
Hi This is one of my fave articles so far on cooking. I am just about to try all this the first time. I have a very pretty plant I grew and she is ready to start drying. Can I take a small amount of the bud after a couple of days of drying and decarb it before its all the way dried and cured and use it? Thanks again for answering the questions. I was able to read through and other people asked the same things I would.

Marijuana oil — AKA canna-oil,  or weed oil to use a more slacker term, is a staple of  many cannabis recipes.  Since THC, the psychoactive component in marijuana, is fat soluble, edible oils make ideal ways to bond it to food.  Likewise marijuana oils are the backbone of many medicated foods.  With these staples stored in your refrigerator or freezer you’re always ready to cook with cannabis.


When choosing a strain to use in your bake, consider the effects each strain offers. Indicas usually offer profound relaxation while sativas are more stimulating. If you want to treat anxiety and pain, you might want an indica. If instead you want to address fatigue, a sativa might be more appropriate. There are as many different strains of these basic categories as there are vendors and the different strains offer different experiences. One way to tell a potent strain is by smell. You want a potent and deep aroma from the strain you choose. You may have to test different strains for  thc edibles and ask other users and vendors what effects each give to find the strains that are right for you.

Set up a double boiler (take a large mason jar and a large saucepan and fill the pan about half way with water). Take your coconut oil and chips and add them to the mason jar, letting the chips slowly melt. It’s important to do this slowly so that you won’t lose any THC from the oil or butter that you’re using. Once the chips are melted, add in your Karo syrup. Be sure that everything is mixed (once the chips have melted fully, you can move the mixture to a bowl but you have to be quick because the liquid solidifies quickly once the heat source is removed) and then pour the mixture in to a saran-wrap lined 8×8 pan. Be sure that the saran-wrap covers the sides of the pan that you’re using so that the candy doesn’t stick. The wrap should overhang far enough that you can now wrap the top of the saran-wrap over the candy, fully covering it. Let the candy sit out overnight.
"This book is not a hodge-podge of information, it is carefully constructed to bring simplicity into your life, should you choose to medicate yourself using edibles....this book makes it sensible to experiment with the luscious sounding recipes that would be right at home-even in a non-cannabis kitchen."―Warren Bobrow, mixologist, chef, and author of Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails, and Tonics: The Art of Spirited Drinks and Buzz-Worthy Libations. www.cocktailwhisperer.com
With summer fast approaching, people are beginning to get prepared for backyard barbecues and trying to look killer in a bathing suit. So while we do understand that candies and confections make great edibles, not everyone wants to mow down on brownies right before beach season. But what if you want to be healthy and get stoned at the same time? Easy enough with this simple recipe for grilled peach cannabis salad. This dish will be perfect for a get together with friends or something to make and store for lunches throughout the week. The recipe comes from Roxanne Dennant at Fruit Slabs, a vegan fruit-leather that’s made for healthy people on the go. The salad, while spicy, remains sweet with the taste of summer.
While some purists will tell you this is hearsay, adding water to your infusing process is a nifty trick. This way, you can infuse at a lower temperature. The amount of water you add is not important, but try to use at least as much water as oil or butter. The water boils off. You can also see the difference in your “washed” end product. It is not as green.
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