I am a teetotaler, I don't drink, smoke or do drugs, but I also have no problem with other people doing whatever they want with their own bodies. I also consider myself to be a fairly competent chef, and combined with the fact that this book was only $3, I thought it might be an interesting read. Additionally, my grandfather died from wasting syndrome secondary to pulmonary fibrosis; had medical marijuana been available he probably would have lived several years longer and I'd have likely needed to learn how to prepare medicinal edibles.
Step 10: After about 5 hours, the butter will solidify and some of the water will turn to ice. Take each container one by one over to the sink, take off the lid, and with one hand supporting the ice block, turn container upside down and release. Some water will come pouring out, and the ice just needs to be scraped away from the main butter block. You should be left with a smooth, round slab of light green butter.
In the early days, Wolf tried selling baklava at Oregon dispensaries, which baffled the medical-stoner crowd. “We were catering to the lowest element of pot smokers,” Wolf said. Since then, the audience has changed: sophisticated consumers are known today as “cannasseurs.” They appreciate savory foods, not only because savories avoid cliché—“everybody infuses desserts,” Wolf said—but also because many medical-marijuana users are diabetic, or avoiding sugar for other reasons. Wolf recommends having a bottle of infused salad dressing or pesto on hand. “Infusing a pesto is so easy,” she said. “You can make a bunch and toss it with noodles, and you’ve got a delicious meal.”

With an easy and more precise dosage method, medical cannabis oils are ideal for oral consumption. However, they can be just as effortlessly added to what you’re eating. Because our extraction process includes decarboxylation, there is no need to decarb the oil on your own before cooking like you have to with dried flower. This means you can just add the oil to basically anything without any fuss or extra time. To add your oil into a food, simply measure your dosage as you normally would do with the syringe and add that specific amount to your recipe. If you’re cooking for one, you only need one dose. If you’re making a large batch, multiple your single dose by how many servings you are creating. (For example, if you’re making a dozen brownies you’ll want to add twelve times your single-use dose.) Ensure you mix thoroughly to distribute your medical cannabis evenly throughout your recipe.
Corinne Tobias, a home cook who writes about cooking with cannabis on her blog Wake + Bake, described an experience in which she ate half of an infused grilled cheese sandwich and got “super crazy ridiculously messed up.” She wrote that she felt like she was “melting into the floor” and spent “half of her afternoon” asking for reassurance that she was not dying. “When I first started cooking with cannabis,” she writes, “I had no idea that it was going to be such a struggle to predict the perfect dosage. I’d make oil using the same method, but every time I harvested a different strain, my cannabis oil would be stronger or weaker and I had to spend a day or two as a human guinea pig, slowly testing my oil until I knew it was just right.” Now she is a fan of the tCheck, a $299 home potency tester.
Bake + get baked all holiday season with this special gift set featuring The Happy (happy!!!) Holiday Pot Cookie Cookbook by Dr. Seymour Kindbud and a trio of cookie cutters. Take your holiday traditions to a higher place with 25 recipes for tasty edibles in the form of sugar cookies, marble brownies and Mexican wedding cookies. A can’t-be-beat recipe for Ganja Butter, the cornerstone of all cannabis cooking, ensures that your sweets are equally delicious and mind alt...
“Oh, we will,” Montrose said, explaining that consumption quality would be judged at a later stage, but that it was essential to examine the plants first. “Some of the cannabis we looked at today, it looked, like, out of this world, outrageous, will blow you away. And you put it under the microscope and it’s full of webs and bugs and spiders, fecal matter, exoskeletons!”
Because cooks use cannabis for its chemical effects, not just as a seasoning, a field of homespun, and increasingly more professional, technology has grown around it. Techniques for refining the plant matter into usable and potent ingredients range from stovetop simple to serious industrial processing—all in the quest to make bioavailable, accurately dosed dishes that also taste good.
That evening’s festivities were business, of a kind. Dope, a “cannabis lifestyle” magazine, was hosting its annual Oregon Dope Cup in Portland. The event is one of many that aspire to be the Oscars of the legal-cannabis industry. Laurie & MaryJane had won a Best Edible trophy at the previous Dope Cup, in Seattle, for its savory nuts. Last year, the company agreed to host an edibles dinner for the magazine’s guests, including the cup’s judges, who had flown in from Colorado.
howdy, I don,t mean to be rude but your culinary skills seem to out way your math skills if you use decent weed 20 percent. In a perfect world that would yield 5600 milligrams thc/cbds & other goodies. Point is those 56 cookies would be 100-milligram dose per cookie but because it’s not a perfect world the dose would be from the 80,s to low 100,s milligram per cookie. Which is a high dose most people should start with 10 milligrams to 20 milligrams once you got your sweet spot you will find pain relive or just a great time!
The bigger issue is having too much THC, because if you have too much of that, the negative effects are pretty pronounced—you'll have anxiety, you'll get paranoid, you'll feel horrible, get nauseous, throw up, and then the next day you'll feel hungover and know you had a really bad experience. You don't want that. You have to know the percentage you're starting with, and then you have to know how that nets out in the butter or oil that you infuse it into.
There is no easier way to ingest too much marijuana than by eating it. Sometimes people are impatient and think “it’s not working” and eat more. By the time it all kicks in they have overdone it. While “overdoses” are not dangerous in that they are never fatal, they won’t shut down your organs, they can make you feel anxious, paranoid, and/or disoriented. Dosing edibles is somewhat of an art, a lot of factors need to be taken into consideration and people’s tolerances run a wide range. An amount that one person does not even physically feel might be enough to make someone else experience couch-lock for hours. When cooking with marijuana, especially new plant material you are not familiar with, it’s a good idea to vape or smoke a little to get general idea of its potency.  Keep in mind that cooking can intensify potency somewhat. If you do find a batch of your edibles is more potent than you intended the remedy is easy – eat less! Learn more about dosing when cooking with marijuana at this link.
Marijuana is oil-based, so knowing this is very important when it comes to cooking with cannabis. THC is the pyschoactive property in Marijuana and is contained in the capitate glands that cover its leaves, but the flowers / marijuana buds contain the most THC. When cooking or baking with marijuana, you should always use an oil-based product, such as butter or vegetable oil, as these do a great job at dissolving the capitate glands and releasing the THC. There are a few basic ways of using the cannabis plant for cooking: one is to make butter aka cannabutter and the other is to make flour. Another way is to make Marijuana Alcohol, which you can learn about in our marijuana beverages section. Either way you choose to make your marijuana induced foods requires the use of either the cannabis plant leaves and clippings or using the finished marijuana buds, which is my preference as it is by far the most potent way of making Weed Butter (Cannabutter). You can cook with cannaoil in any recipe that calls for oil.
In some ways, cooking with cannabis is just regular cooking, with a few adjustments for taste and technical considerations. The food can’t be cooked at temperatures higher than three hundred and forty degrees, because that would destroy the THC. “It’s been a little bit of a challenge cooking some foods that normally benefit from a really high heat start,” Wolf said. An example is fried chicken, which she recommends topping with infused oil or salsa.
First things first: depending on the product you’ve purchased, you’ll be able to see THC-A and/or THC levels of your concentrate on the package label. Most concentrates aren’t decarboxylated (heat activated), and will have a very high THC-A and a low THC labeling . THC-A turns into THC when in contact with heat for a certain amount of time. THC-A loses approximately 13% of its mass when decarboxylated. After you’ve calculated how much of your THC-A corresponds to THC, you would additionally add the small THC amount in the label of your product. Please make sure to calculate your THC correctly. Below is a formula for calculating your total and final THC levels.

Marijuana cooking with concentrates, namely kief and hash, opens up a whole new world of recipes that can be converted to cannabis cooking.  A lot of these recipes contain far less fat than ones that depend on butter or oil to carry the medication, an important consideration for those trying to curb calories or limit fats. Of course cannabis metabolizes better with some fat, but when you cook with concentrates, you eliminate the need to add extra oil or butter to achieve a proper dose.


After the liquid forms the thin layer of ice, remove the bowl from the freezer. Don’t let the liquid swish around or you’ll disturb the settled trichomes. Using a turkey baster or something similar, slowly remove the liquid from the bowl. This is a time consuming process because you can’t disturb the settled matter at the bottom. Once the liquid gets down to a very low level, you can use paper towels to help absorb. After you’ve removed the liquid, take a hair dryer to the mixture, carefully drying it. The mixture should get lighter and be about the same color all the way around.
If you want to get started making your own edibles at home but do not know how, don’t worry – there is a cannabis cookbook out there for you! In this list we will go over our top 10 favorite edibles cookbooks, featuring recipes for all tastes, budgets, and skill levels. You will find omnivorous and vegan treats, sweet and savory, complex recipes and some that take as little as five minutes to prepare.

The first thing you must do if cooking with cannabis is to activate the THC and/or CBD. And that requires heat. The process you will use to do this is called decarboxylation. This is what will give your edibles the “buzz” you want. Beyond that, however, raw cannabis placed directly into recipes will not allow the range of cannabinoids found in the plant to activate and bind to fat. You will just be wasting cannabis, in other words. And who wants that?
Basil traveled from Chicago to attend Feast and signed up for the Sugar High class because he’s “just fascinated by the whole phenomenon of edibles,” he said. He’s never cooked with cannabis before but figured if he came to Portland, a city known for pot, he might be able to pick up a few pointers. A carpenter by trade, Basil has dealt with carpel tunnel problems in both hands for the last few years. 
Place the sweet potatoes in a preheated oven at 400 degrees F until they are soft. Peel the potatoes and then mash them with 3 ounces of bud butter and 1 tablespoon of rum. Place this mixture aside for now and melt the remaining ounce of bud butter with a sauté pan. Add in the sugar and stir the mix until the sugar melts fully and it begins to bubble slowly. Toss in the grapefruit and sauté this all together until the liquid is reduced by about half. Grab your fresh grapefruit juice and add that in as well as the last 2 tablespoons of rum. Cook this all together for about a minute. Add this new mix in with the sweet potatoes and mix together well. Season with salt and pepper to taste if you would like and boom! These mashed grapefruit sweet potatoes are hot and ready to serve! Enjoy!
You might be wondering why I include water as an ingredient.  Including water, especially when infusing marijuana oil on the stovetop, insures the cannabis will never reach a higher temperature than the boiling point or 212 degrees F.  More importantly, the chlorophyll and terpenes – the parts of the plant that give it its flavor and color — are water soluble and most will likewise bind to water during the cooking process instead of infusing themselves into the fats along with the THC.  This will mean less herbal flavor and green color in the finished marijuana oil.
While historians have found recipes involving weed dating back to 15th century Europe and even 10th century India, pot brownies were introduced to pop (or should we say “pot”?) culture in the 1968 movie “I Love You Alice B. Toklas.” Objectively, the most common way to make weed-laced snacks is marijuana butter, but baking with cannabis oil can be even more effective. While these two products have many similar uses and come from the same plant, they’re produced and used in very different ways.
Sayegh is at the forefront of a growing movement to reimagine cannabis in the kitchen, and he’s become known for his many-coursed gourmet THC-infused dinners in a style he describes as “French with Italian and Middle Eastern influence.” But tonight his gingerbread construction—which he’s created for a party benefitting the victims of a warehouse fire in Northern California—is just for show. Sayegh hasn’t lab-tested the village, so he doesn’t know how potent it might be, and he won’t serve imprecisely dosed food. Once upon a time, the menu included cannabis-infused appetizers to appease guests salivating over the off-limits village, but it turns out cocktails are on offer at this party, and mixing cannabis edibles with liquor can make for a “dizzy” experience, he says; he doesn’t serve them together. Guests still partake of his hors d’oeuvres, but they’re made solely from non-mind-expanding ingredients. Navigating such things are all part of the job; complications traditional chefs have never pondered.
If you’re already using cannacaps or want to start, infused coconut oil is a great addition to your capsules. Because coconut oil has a high saturated fat content, it helps your body best absorb  the cannabinoids, delivering a stronger effect per dose of medicine (THC and CBD) than other oils. In addition, coconut oil has a long shelf life, meaning that cannacaps made with this oil will last an extremely long time (especially if stored in the fridge or freezer!)
Hello from the Yukon Territory. I’m a senior citizen and relatively new to this edibles game. I’ve started growing my own, outdoors, without too much fanfare. My plants (about 1/2 doz) make a few buds, that are far from high quality. All I do is dry my plants, grind them up in a food processor till close to the consistency of flour, and make small cookies. I use a half teaspoon for measuring the batter–cute little green ovals. My niece and I call them “beetles”. I’m happy with the buzz I get, and it helps with a few aches and pains I get from my senior age, but reading here and elsewhere, I see there is a lot more to the science behind it all. I’m also realizing that a lot of you may find it perhaps crude that I just cook with the pot the way I do, but I’m happy with the simplicity, and will probably continue with this method. However, do I deduce correctly, that my finished product will be better if I heat my dried and ground pot first in the oven, for 20 minutes at 250 degrees, before I make my beetles?
The following day, the candy should have hardened in to a taffy like substance, not too hard but not too soft. If the mixture hasn’t gained the correct consistency, continue to let it sit out until it does. Once the mix has the taffy consistency that we all love, you can cut it in to pieces and wrap them individually in wax or cellophane. Give them out as treats or hoard them all for yourself! Either way, enjoy your awesome taffy candy!

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You sound biter about the taste of weed. If done without any care, yeah it taste like shit but weed can add some awesome flavor if done correctly. I made a lemon meringue pie with cannabis once and the flower really made it something special. No ass taste, just good lemon flavor complemented by the weed. too much weed and it starts to taste funny like you said but just the right amount is great. Too much of a good thing is never good.
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