For those who prefer to avoid smoking or vaporizing cannabis, cannabis infused edibles are a great solution. In fact edibles represent one of the fastest growing product categories among medical and recreational dispensaries nationally. Nearly 5 million edible products were sold in Colorado alone in 2014. For those living in less tolerant states, you can make your own edibles at home with surprising ease. In this guide we will cover how to make edibles, how to determine dosage, and why the high associated with edibles feels so strong.
In those days, dispensaries catered to what Wolf calls “the medical-stoner community,” heavy users and people with chronic pain. The edible offerings were informal. “You’d say, ‘What kind of edibles do you have?’ They’d say, ‘Well, my grandmother makes these pot brownies. And my stepmother’s cousin makes these.’ ” The dosage was usually very high—over a hundred milligrams of THC in a single brownie. The taste was “dreadful,” Wolf said. “It was like somebody took a bud and dipped it in chocolate.”
The definitive guide to making easy, everyday cannabis edibles for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert, my friend Cheri Sicard has done it again!  A lot of people ask for cannabis recipes and I always refer them to Cheri’s books.  Her latest, The Easy Cannabis Cookbook, is simple, fun and perfect for the novice marijuana enthusiast.  Check it out!

Perfecting the ultimate balance between sweet and spicy, ginger cookies have long been a wintertime favourite. If you’re using cannabis infused butter, make the recipe as is. However, if you’re adding your cannabis oil directly, you may want to slightly reduce the amount of (non-infused) butter you are using to maintain the correct amount of moisture. This recipe makes two dozen medium-sized cookies, so you’ll need to add that many doses of oil during the butter and molasses stage. All of the spice amounts here can be reduced or increased based on your preference. If you don’t have all of these spices on hand, using a pre-blended pumpkin pie spice will work almost as well (maybe with a little extra ground ginger added for good measure).

“I cook for a lot of sick people out there,” he says. “I don’t charge to do this. They acquire the cannabis, and I’ll go there and cook a meal for them. The most important thing is, when I go and cook, I teach them how to do it themselves. Because I can’t feed everybody on a constant basis, and for a lot of people, this is not recreational. This is a lifestyle change they’re making, that they can actually use cannabis they’ve been prescribed for medicinal purposes.”
When cannabis is legalized on Oct. 17, Canadians still won’t be able to buy weed brownies in the store. Edible pot products aren’t part of the initial roll-out out, and there’s no word yet on when they will be available. You can, however, buy your own cannabis and turn it into special brownies, cookies and pretty much anything else you can dream up. Here’s how to do it.
This is my first batch. I used 1oz manicured ground cured bud in 1lb of butter. I put both in a slow cooker plus a cup of water. I set the cooker to the lowest temp for the longest time. Next day, I poured the butter & bud (water evaporated) through a tea strainer into a pyrex measuring cup. I had no cheesecloth and I suspect I’ll want to strain the cannabutter again before I put it in (Cook’s Illustrated Classic) Brownies. We will make the brownies next week. Wish us well.
It was the Instagram account—where he posts things like artfully plated cannabis-infused foie gras custard with blackberry gelée, fish with radish marinated in a cannabis-vinegar blend, and peppercorn-crusted strip steak in a medicated Cabernet Sauvignon reduction—that led to his first private dinner. Things snowballed from there. Now, in addition to his restaurant ambitions and dinners, he’s gearing up for a TV show he describes as “Anthony Bourdain meets Bear Grylls”. The restaurant alone has presented a list of challenges not faced by traditional restaurateurs, from training cooks and waiters to work with cannabis to finding a landlord willing to rent to him.
“I tell people that they need to soak the cannabis in distilled water for at least 24 to 48 hours just to take out the impurities and to remove the chlorophyll,” Jeff says. “And I teach people how to blanch it to take out even more of the taste and more of the impurities, so you’re working with a really fine product that you’re going to infuse into your butter or oil.”

Published in 2015 by a Colorado writer and photographer, this cookbook collects recipes from a dozen chefs and one bartender who specialize in cannabis-infused food. Before the recipes, there’s a 100-plus-page section that provides biographies of the chefs and discusses many aspects of buying, identifying and cooking with cannabis, covering cooking cultivars, details on infusions and extractions, plus dosing tips. There’s a longer section on how to make the oils and butters and tinctures than in many books; it also includes recipes for infused milk, cream, honey and simple syrup, all of which makes the recipes that follow succinct. The dosage per serving is clearly stated, and the recipe headnotes often include nicely geeky bits, such as how mangoes are reputed to heighten the effects of cannabis because they’re high (ha-ha) in myrcene molecules. Thus a recipe for rice pudding with green cardamom, mango and pistachios.


With 4/20 around the corner and more legalized recreational marijuana than ever before, both heavy stoners and first-time tokers are asking the same question when it comes to weed in the kitchen: What is the difference between cannabis oil and marijuana butter? While they do have a lot of similarities, confusing the two can have serious consequences—getting uncomfortably stoned, ruining a pan, or even wasting your weed. To truly understand their unique and similar qualities, we need to look at how they’re made, how they’re used, and where you can get them.

The definitive guide to making easy, everyday cannabis edibles for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert, my friend Cheri Sicard has done it again!  A lot of people ask for cannabis recipes and I always refer them to Cheri’s books.  Her latest, The Easy Cannabis Cookbook, is simple, fun and perfect for the novice marijuana enthusiast.  Check it out!
Sayegh knows that THC in the kitchen has an image problem outside of the cannabis world. People dismiss it as a gimmick, something just for mega-stoners, or an opportunity to rip people off. Even Sayegh’s family balked at his career path. They weren’t thrilled when he dropped out of college. They were double un-thrilled when he remade himself as an infused-food gourmand. His mom booted him from the house and told him to stay away from his little brother. But even they’ve come around.
Heat up your grill on low/medium heat and cut your peach in half. Coat the fruit with the cannabis coconut oil that you have and sprinkle cinnamon over the halves. Put a piece of tinfoil on the grill and once it is warm enough, place the peaches on for about five minutes. They should be warm but not too hot. If they get too hot, they will turn to mush so be careful to keep an eye on them. While the peaches are grilling, you can quickly gather the ingredients for the balsamic vinaigrette. Put all of the greens in a large bowl and top it with the blackberries.
It depends on the strength of the kief and the tolerance of the person consuming it. Everyone responds drastically differently to cannabis, especially edible cannabis. While 10 mgs THC (the maximum per serving dose allowed in commercial edibles in many states) will be too much for some people, 100 mgs will not be enough for others. If you look at recipes for kief they recommend anywhere from 1/16 of a gram up to a gram (although in most cases that will be way too strong). This why I ever dosing extensively in my online cooking course and even a dosage calculator tool in my free online dosing class (find both at http://www.Cannademy.com ). Dosing is also covered extensively in my new book The Easy Cannabis Cookbook (http://bit.ly/EasyCannabisCookbook) and in less detail on this website (but the basics are also here) in the Marijuana Cooking Tutorials section under the Cooking Basics tab.
Cannabis oil extracted via heat and pressure can be used in topicals or ingested by itself orally, but the taste and consistency leave a lot to be desired. The most common way to consume cannabis oil, also known as “concentrate” or “dab,” is by vaporizing or smoking it, but it can also act as an ingredient for an easier method of making weed butter. By simply melting the dab with some butter or oil at a low temperature, mixing them into one substance, you’ve made marijuana butter! Keep in mind, however, that cannabis oil needs to adhere to the same temperature cap of 245 degrees Fahrenheit to minimize the destruction of the THC. One downside to cooking with butter derived from cannabis oil versus marijuana is the stickiness of the product—certain types of oil can leave behind a difficult residue on cookware. (For those reading this tip too late, try rescuing your pan with 99% isopropyl alcohol! It’s super effective.)
Even though Memorial Day has passed in the States, the barbecues aren’t quite over yet! The 4th of July has yet to happen and there are plenty of weekends left with beautiful weather! Looking to spice up your usually normal barbecue with some cannabis fun? This recipe will teach you how to infuse your BBQ sauce with cannabis, not only giving you a great sauce but also an awesome way to medicate this summer.
Combine in your glass jar, 3 ounces of drinking alcohol with your ounce of hash oil, or in a 3:1 ratio, according to the strength of your hash oil.  Seal the mixture and put it in the freezer for 6 or more days, shaking a few times per day.  Now store your tincture in your one ounce eye drop bottles.  Before taking, you should first calculate how much thc each dropper, and each drop holds, according to the strength of the hash oil and how much you’ve used.  This method has the most easy method of consumption.  Use the eye dropper to squirt a measured amount of weed tincture under the tongue, hold for half a minute, then swallow it down.  The thc and other cannabinoids will bring health benefits, but the psychoactive ingredients will have less effect because it may not have been activated by heat.  As with any oral consumption, effects come on slow and then goes stronger for longer.  It is important to make sure you know how much cannabinoids you are consuming, and not to re-dose before the effects take hold, which can take as much as one to two hours.
Sayegh wears chef’s whites. He’s quick to smile, athletic, with his hair cropped short on the sides and a tight burst of sandy curls on top. His Maltese-poodle mix, MooMoo, is cavorting around his feet. Just a few years ago, you wouldn’t have found him in uniform, but pondering his fate at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He was a sophomore studying molecular biology, homesick for the mansaf and other dishes his Jordanian family raised him on—and a fledgling pot smoker. A budding scientist, he decided that if he was going to get high, he should probably find out what it was doing to his body.
Step 10: After about 5 hours, the butter will solidify and some of the water will turn to ice. Take each container one by one over to the sink, take off the lid, and with one hand supporting the ice block, turn container upside down and release. Some water will come pouring out, and the ice just needs to be scraped away from the main butter block. You should be left with a smooth, round slab of light green butter.
A slow cooker is my favorite way, but you could also infuse on the stovetop in a double boiler (it just takes more babysitting). If you are going to buy a slow cooker temp variables are good to have for sure. I like the Hamilton Beach Stay and Go slow cooker because it clamps closed so you don’t get any kitchen odor while cooking. An Instant Pot on the slow cooker setting is also great and is versatile for other things (does the work of 8 or 9 different appliances) and also no odor while cooking.
How to make Marinated Chicken Legs with Marijuana… Stoner life isn’t all about snack,s and we do know how to enjoy a well cooked savory meal. Chicken is the bomb, and pretty much everyone on the planet agrees, but chicken that gets you high; whoa!  This recipe is a weed smokers dream meal. The marinade is delicious and penetrates through the chicken legs to give you a burst of moist chicken flavor in every bite. Grab a leg and eat it alone, or serve with your favorite side for complete satisfaction.
Hugh! I am so glad to have found you! I have been smoking herb for 37 yrs but am asthmatic and recently my lungs got so bad I HAD to give it up! After my lungs improved I researched how to make oil with herb but some of the instructions make no sense to me – wash the herb, dry it (or put it in a dehydrator?), wash it again, then roast it: all before cooking it with oil, in a special contraption, for 18hrs??? I consider myself a quick study & good cook so I combined a bunch of methods, took advice from some of the comments, simplified it & tried the following: I cleaned it (I buy it on the stalk with seeds in, leaves removed); chopped it in a coffee grinder – just like I would before rolling, fine but not powdery – roasted it on a cookie sheet in my oven at 250 for 1hr; put it in a glass bowl with coconut oil at a 1:2 herb to oil ratio; returned it to the oven & continued heating it at 250 for 2hrs. After it cooled I strained it using cheese cloth & used some in baking, some on crackers, some mixed with peanut butter. I found it best in the baking. I am currently living in the Caribbean and – after years of searching – finally found a grower/seller who provides me with very good quality herb at a great price (VERY hard for a non local to get). Pure coconut oil (commercial, not organic) is a helluva lot cheaper than butter here and I am on a tight budget so I am happy with this this combination/method. Also, the amount of herb that I would have smoked in 1 day made enough baked goods to last me 10 days!!! SO MY QUESTION, after all that (LOL) is, do you think I need to roast the herb before putting it in the oil? The above recipe doesn’t call for it but it does call for much more cooking time of the oil – and doesn’t mention oven heating, which I find easy. Alternatively, do you think I could cut the oil heating down to 1hr? I know absolutely nothing about science and I would like to make the process as efficient as possible. I guess it would be easiest to chop the herb, stalk seeds & all, but how would that affect the taste & potency? With my described method there was almost no smell when it was roasting alone or being heated with the oil, and no herb taste in the baked goods. And another thing: back in Canada a guy I used to buy herb cookies from told me to eat something small (like a 2nd, non-herb cookie) 15-20 minutes after ingesting as it would jump-start the high. I find this to be true but am wondering if it just works because I believe it will? Do you know anything about that? Lastly, I found that my baked goods didn’t fully kick in for 45mins – 1hr but the high lasted 4 – 6hrs. Thanks so much for any input you may have! 🙂
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