This 3-year-old cookbook from two classically trained chefs — the pair have degrees from the Culinary Institute of America, Le Cordon Bleu and Johnson and Wales between them — is one of the better books about cannabis cooking. It’s both pragmatic and culinary-minded, and avoids the stoner language that can obfuscate the prose of the genre. The concise “cannabis 101” intro section concludes with good recipes for canna-oil, canna-butter and compound butters made with it — a great and nicely cheffy touch. The recipes focus on well-sourced ingredients and give techniques for components in such a way that you could easily use the book for non-pot cooking. I’d switch out the cannabutter for regular butter and make the triple-chocolate espresso cookies on a regular rotation, and the matcha sugar cookies too.

Marijuana oil — AKA canna-oil,  or weed oil to use a more slacker term, is a staple of  many cannabis recipes.  Since THC, the psychoactive component in marijuana, is fat soluble, edible oils make ideal ways to bond it to food.  Likewise marijuana oils are the backbone of many medicated foods.  With these staples stored in your refrigerator or freezer you’re always ready to cook with cannabis.
While some purists will tell you this is hearsay, adding water to your infusing process is a nifty trick. This way, you can infuse at a lower temperature. The amount of water you add is not important, but try to use at least as much water as oil or butter. The water boils off. You can also see the difference in your “washed” end product. It is not as green.

Nick and Mary eventually decided to follow his parents to Portland, where Mary began helping her mother-in-law with the company. She created a Facebook page and designed the logo, coming up with a whisk-and-marijuana-leaf motif. Before long, Mary told me, “I realized we could have a real business.” She and Wolf are an unlikely pair. In contrast to Wolf’s bohemian vibe, Mary exudes wholesomeness. She has short blond hair and rosy cheeks. “I call us Beauty and Obese,” Wolf said. In cooking videos on the Cannabist, they have an “Absolutely Fabulous” dynamic. When Mary says, “We’re going to mix it all into the pot, and it’s going to be delicious,” her mother-in-law exclaims, “Ha-ha. You said ‘pot!’ ” But their skills appear to be well matched. Wolf is the right-brain person, dreaming up recipe ideas, while Mary oversees the left-brain tasks, navigating Oregon’s complicated regulatory requirements.

Wolf advocates a cautious approach. “Our philosophy is ‘less is more,’ ” she said. “Figure out the littlest bit of cannabis that will get you to a good place and start with that.” The Trichome guys agreed. “Cannabis education is the most necessary thing in this industry, across the board!” Montrose said, piously. He talked about having a “number,” as for a Sleep Number bed. “I’m an eighty-milligram dude. I know my edible tolerance, because I’ve dialled it in so precisely,” he said. “I know that if I want a really pleasant experience, a relaxing, pain-relieving experience, eighty milligrams is perfect for me. If I want to go to sleep? One hundred and twenty milligrams. If I want to keep working? Fifteen milligrams.”
Cannabis edibles have come a long way from brownies and cookies. Just ask Cheri Sicard, nicknamed the “Martha Stewart of weed” by The Daily Beast, who serves up the most definitive guide to cooking with cannabis in The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. Featuring a comprehensive introduction to the history and benefits of cannabis, a fool-proof guide to finding your perfect dose, and 60 reliable recipes that redefine stoner eats, this cookbook makes eating homemade edibles easy.
If you were looking for the perfect game-day snack to serve to all your pals, then search no more! This nacho cheese is creamy cheesy bliss and when the high kicks in while the game’s on it won’t matter if your team wins or not, either way you’ll be happy dipping crunchy chips into this dip again and again. Both canna-butter and canna olive oil can be used in this dip so be prepared for some pretty potent bites.
Wolf gave me a preview of the meal: marijuana-free chicken Marbella and couscous, paired with infused sides and appetizers. The dishes had been set out on a sideboard. Next to each one was a card with the potency level noted in calligraphy: “Stuffed Mushrooms, 5 mg THC each.” (Five milligrams of tetrahydrocannabinol is about the equivalent of a few puffs from a joint.) The secret to cooking with cannabis is fat. THC, the main psychoactive ingredient, bonds to fat molecules when heated. There are high-tech ways of doing this, but Wolf prefers to do it “the old-fashioned way, with good butter and good oil.” Her cookbooks always begin with recipes for what she calls canna-butter and canna-oil.
Also, if you do plan on straining the milk, you can save what gets taken out of the mix and dry it. Store this mixture to use in edibles later! It’s always nice to have a recipe that reuses ingredients more than once, making sure to get as much benefit as possible from everything. This milk can also be flavored with all kinds of natural flavors! For this season, cinnamon would be absolutely perfect. Of course, try out a bunch and pick your favorite! Enjoy your healthy, delicious hempseed milk!
There are so many thoughts on how to decarb weed, just trying to figure out the best, most efficient method. Right now I’d like to try baking with the leafy material, no buds. What are your thoughts on the ratio of product to butter, how long to decarb and cook. Keep in mind I have a Magical Butter machine whose basic instructions, for butter, is 160 degrees for 2 hours after decarbing at 250 degrees for 30 minutes. It also specifically recommends not to use water during the butter making process. Generally, I’ve used 1 oz of bud to 2 lbs. of unsalted butter using this process but now I’d like to try leaf. Any suggestions before I get started? Woofy
Squeeze and pat dry your thawed wings until you have them as dry as you can get them. Combine all of your dry ingredients (salt, garlic powder, cayenne pepper, onion powder, paprika, pepper, and flour) into a gallon sized sealable plastic bag. Once you have all the dry ingredients mixed in your plastic sealable bag add your wings, seal the bags, and toss until the wings are evenly coated with your flour mixture. Now place your coated wings on a cookie sheet, cover with plastic wrap or aluminum foil and refrigerate for a minimum of one hour. This step can be done the night before which is awesome!
Bake + get baked all holiday season with this special gift set featuring The Happy (happy!!!) Holiday Pot Cookie Cookbook by Dr. Seymour Kindbud and a trio of cookie cutters. Take your holiday traditions to a higher place with 25 recipes for tasty edibles in the form of sugar cookies, marble brownies and Mexican wedding cookies. A can’t-be-beat recipe for Ganja Butter, the cornerstone of all cannabis cooking, ensures that your sweets are equally delicious and mind altering. Perfect for getting through the holiday season with the best vibes ever. Hardcover.
OK, this one isn’t a mistake as there is more than one way to infuse.  Some people do not like to add water to the mix, but I do.  Especially on the stovetop, the water will help things infuse at a lower temperature and avoid things burning and scorching which will result in unappetizing taste and THC that’s rendered useless by being cooked at too high a temperature. The water also helps with appearance and flavor by washing away some of the green color and strong herbal flavor.  The photo at the right shows marijuana butter made with and without water in the mix and marijuana oil made with and without water.  The same type and amount of marijuana was used for each of the infusions in the exact same amount. In all instances there was a better final yield when using water, and a lighter color and less herbal flavor.  The amount of water is not important, but I always add at least as much water as butter or oil. I do this even when infusing in the slow cooker.  Click to find instructions for how to make marijuana butter and cannabis oil.
Sayegh knows that THC in the kitchen has an image problem outside of the cannabis world. People dismiss it as a gimmick, something just for mega-stoners, or an opportunity to rip people off. Even Sayegh’s family balked at his career path. They weren’t thrilled when he dropped out of college. They were double un-thrilled when he remade himself as an infused-food gourmand. His mom booted him from the house and told him to stay away from his little brother. But even they’ve come around.
Long considered a closeted activity, cooking with cannabis isn’t just for the super stoner anymore. As legalized marijuana use – for both medicinal and recreational purposes – continues to gain support across the country, home cooks are starting to incorporate cannabis into everyday meals. Yes, some people just want to get buzzed. But others want to alleviate chronic pain, lessen anxiety and sleep better. And they want to do it without smoking.
JeffThe420Chef is considered one of the finest cannabis chefs in the world. The Wake and Bake Podcast host specializes in foods that are high in THC and CBD, but low in that heavy cannabis taste that some people find off-putting. His book also provides instructions for strain-specific butters and oils. Known for his “pot Shabbat” dinners inspired by his upbringing in Orthodox Judaism, “The 420 Gourmet” has plenty of traditional kosher recipes, including his famous potato latkes with canna-pear crème fraiche.
Full article reprinted with permission from America's Test Kitchen. The piece originally appeared online at the Cook's Science website. Author Andy Wright is a writer based out of San Francisco. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Matter, Popular Mechanics, Atlas Obscura, Pacific Standard and other publications. She is the former deputy editor of Modern Farmer. Learn more at her website, Twitter and Instagram.
The quality of butane gas used to make BHO is an additional health consideration. Among the Colorado marijuana business regulations, R605 says extraction companies must use solvents that are either food-grade or at least 99 percent pure; the purety of the butane is important because other less-expensive grades can contain contaminants not meant for human consumption.
The benefits of marijuana for treating symptoms of severe illnesses are immeasurable. People with AIDS, cancer, neurological issues, arthritis, anxiety, depression, glaucoma, and many other illnesses are turning to cannabis to avoid the powerful and unpleasant side effects that often come with traditional medications. An easy way to incorporate cannabis into your life is to include it in your everyday diet.
Butter is used in a multitude of recepies in cooking and is loved by many, but spread this stuff on your toast in the morning and everyone around will just have to watch you float away, and then ask you for some. Canna-butter is one of the most commonly used forms of cannabis when it comes to cooking and whipping up edibles because of its versatility, and the fact that it’s pure genius in butter form.
Before learning about ways to make marijuana your go-to herb in the kitchen, find out whether it’s legal in the state you’re in. Currently, medical marijuana is legal in 30 states and Washington, D.C., while eight states and the District of Columbia have legalized it for recreational use. Thirteen states, however, have decriminalization laws in effect, so make sure to know what the legalities are where you live first.
Andrea Drummer is a Los Angeles-based culinary school grad and private chef specializing in cannabis cooking. Maybe because of her culinary training, the book is short on the science of cooking with cannabis and long on recipes, including some fun ones such as kimchi fried rice and escargot in puff pastry. This is both good and bad, as the recipes for infused stock, pasta dough and mayonnaise are comforting for home cooks, but the book doesn’t give much information about how to work with or use cannabis. (There’s also no index, which is frustrating.) Although Drummer gives bud pairings, as if she’s talking about a good Cabernet, decarboxylation isn’t even mentioned; recipes simply call for grams of “cannabis product.” This assumes a lot, and unless you’re already versed in this kind of cooking, you’ll need outside reference in order to use this one properly.
In a legal state, home cooks have access not only to lab-tested fresh product but sometimes also to lab-tested butters and oils. Some who prefer to infuse at home rely on online potency calculators, of which there are several. Sites like Wikileaf catalog the potency of different strains, and home potency-testing tools are starting to hit the market.

Did you cook the butter with water? If so sometimes you will have residual water left after straining. I strain and then heat gently to remove any residual water as it can cause mold if left for long periods, then do a secondary straining to get rid of any other sediment. If you did not add water to the mix, I am not sure where it would be coming from.
“I would say I’m a ten,” Wolf said. She’s had only one edibles disaster. Four years ago, in her rookie phase, she and a friend consumed too much cannabis before a Halloween party. She ended up accosting a partygoer who was dressed as a doctor and asking about a bunch of medical issues. “It was absolutely mortifying,” she said. “I forgot it was a costume party.” She has also had complications with LSD, which she told us about at the table. “Once, when I was tripping, I ate a cinnamon candle,” she said. She thought it was cinnamon toast.

StonerDays Cookbook Persimmon Bread is not like your Grandma’s . This is a stoners little twist on Grandmother’s Persimmon Bread Recipe. Not only does this bread taste delicious and make you feel good it also calls for fresh persimmons, which are a super sweet fruit full of vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants. It stays good for about a week and is a bread that does well freezing for later too. Enjoy!

As we discussed earlier, kief and hash can range from dry and crumbly to sticky and gummy.  Many smokers prefer the latter, but for cooking purposes, the dry, crumbly, powdery stuff is often easiest to work with because it is easy to grind which then allows you to stir the fine powder into all kinds of foods, something impossible to do with the gummy type of hash.  If you plan on dissolving the hash in a hot liquid, however, either type will work fine. Learn more about dealing with the various consistencies of hash and kief at this link.


Amy Scattergood is a staff writer for the Food section of the Los Angeles Times. She has degrees from Yale Divinity School, the Iowa Writers Workshop and the Cordon Bleu and has written a book of poetry and co-written a whole grain cookbook. Although originally from Iowa, she’s lived in L.A. for a long time now and will continue to do so, as long as tacos and the Pacific Ocean exist.
 Now let it cook on the grill for about 8-10 minutes or until the insides are no longer pink (when checking for pinkness, pick the largest part of the chicken). If you like your grilled chicken smothered in perfectly sinful sauce, use 2 cups of honey BBQ sauce with 2 teaspoons of canna-oil and stir together, it adds a great finishing touch. This is what you would call a gourmet way to get blown, bon appetit!
For decarbing I would not recommend a large skillet like that as I doubt the temperature is consistent throughout and it is not meant for baking – you would have a hot spot under the dish, it might work, but I can’t see it’s your best option. I think a small well made toaster oven, with oven thermometer would be a better choice for someone on a budget.
Hi, I used 15g of quality stuff here in Hawaii, 2 cups coconut organic oil and 2 tablespoons of litchen granules. Spelled in wrong. Anyways I decarb in the oven for 30 min at 240, put everything in crock pot on a low for most the day and keep warm for some sitting occasionally. I cooked for 10 hours strained and chilled. Used it later that the next day in brownies and cookies adding 1/2 cup to a gluten free brownie mix, and and 3/4 cup to chocolate cookies. I ate two cookies. It only felt a little bit but I was high all day. Should this be enough for decent edibles or will I have to eat a lot?
One more point I should make. I live in the bush, and only have a wood cookstove to do my baking in. The oven temperature is hard to control, and I realize now that that is an important consideration. So in future, I’ll do my baking in town at my niece’s place, in an electric oven where I can control the temperature better. So if you suggest that I should heat my pot first for 20 min (decarbing, I guess), then can you suggest what temp, and for how long I should bake the little critters? Thanks in advance for your help. A very informative site!
You’ll first want to know which family the marijuana you’re cooking with belongs to. “There’s sativa, which is more uplifting, and [gives you] more energy and focus,” Jeff explains. “Indica is the opposite, it’s a much more relaxed feeling. An indica-based strain will make you chill, relaxed. It will give you what people refer to as couch-lock, where you’re pretty much just hanging out and don’t really want to move.”
Obligatory Bob Loblaw Disclaimer: While cannabis is legal for recreational use in Colorado and Washington, as well as for medical use in 20 states and D.C., it is still technically illegal under federal law. Do this at your own risk. Also remember that edibles require longer to take effect (anywhere from 30 minutes to 3 hours) but hit way harder than smoking, along with longer lasting effects (anywhere from 2 to 8 hours depending on the strength of the butter and the number of brownies you just inhaled). Do not attempt to drive, operate heavy machinery, perform surgery, perform long division, or generally move further from your couch than absolutely necessary.
The effects of the weed lollipop are just as good as those of baked weed, but it comes on even slower, over an hour or two, and lasts even longer. Since it takes a while to dissolve the lollipop, you may be able to suck a lollipop for an hour, then immediately have another. You won’t have to worry about dosing because the time it takes to consume the lollipop will force you to be unable to overdose, unless of course you chew the lollipop rather than sucking. So, suck the weed lollipop, let it take at least an hour, and you can have another while waiting for the effects to begin over the next hour.
Extracts, or concentrates, are exactly what they sound like—products with high levels of THC that are made from cannabis by a number of methods, from sifting buds to isolate cannabinoid-rich trichomes,to supercritical CO2 extraction, which uses carbon dioxide at very high pressures to pull cannabinoids from the plant. (This professional technique is a popular way to decaffeinate coffee.) There is a dizzying array of extracts available, as well as ways to consume them, from vaporizing to smoking them atop traditional bud. And some have found their way into the kitchen.
Take the sugar, syrup, and water and mix them together in a pot. Set it on the stove over a medium heat and stir them together until they ingredients dissolve. The mixture should begin to boil after a bit. Make sure that all of your ingredients have been mixed well! After the mixture begins to boil, slowly add the color and flavoring to the pot. Your mixture should be heated to about 300 degrees. This part is a little tricky because you have add the tincture very quickly. Speed is necessary at this part in the process because the liquid solidifies as soon as it begins to cool. Once you’ve quickly stirred in the tincture, pour the liquid in to your molds and let them set.
Take the cannabis, lime juice, water, green onion, and the oil and place it in the crock pot. Cook the materials on low for about two hours. Once two hours has gone by, place the apple cider vinegar, soy sauce, tomato paste, chili powder, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, honey, ground ginger, cayenne pepper, and the apricot nectar in to the crockpot with the previously cooked mixture. Mix everything together well and cook on low for another hour at least. Be sure to stir the mixture occasionally. Once the sauce is done cooking, store it in an airtight container in the fridge. The recipe will yield about two cups of sauce and is definitely perfect for your backyard barbecues! Enjoy!
Wolf’s mixed nuts have had a lot of traction. She adapted them from a Danny Meyer recipe and added infused coconut oil, a staple in her kitchen because it can also be used topically, “so you’re getting more bang for your buck.” (An elderly friend of Wolf’s rubs it on his hands to treat his rheumatoid arthritis.) Wolf’s newest book, “Cooking with Cannabis,” emphasizes comfort foods like mac and cheese and meatloaf. There’s a chapter called “Recipes for One,” intended for solo eaters. “It’s great to be able to make yourself ramen,” she said. (The cannabis goes in the broth, mixed with sesame oil.)
Take all of your fresh ingredients and place them in to a medium sized mixing bowl. Mix everything together for about ten minutes, making sure that everything is well blended. It should have the consistency of normal dressing, creamy and smooth. However, if you like your dressing to be slightly more or less creamy, you can adjust the recipe as you see fit. Don’t forget to add in the salt and pepper also. Once the dressing tastes right, place the bowl in the fridge for at least two hours before you serve it. Enjoy your medicated dressing!
Wolf’s own child-rearing was complicated by health issues. One day in the early eighties, not long after she’d had her first baby, she was at Barneys, shopping with a friend, when she began to feel dizzy. She woke up hours later, at home. “I couldn’t remember anything.” (She’d passed out on the floor of the tie department, and the friend had taken her home in a cab.) Terrified, she saw a doctor, who determined that she’d had a seizure. She was given a diagnosis of epilepsy, and began taking the anti-convulsant Tegretol. It controlled the seizures, but left her with unpleasant side effects: nausea, headaches, exhaustion. Trying to get pregnant for a second time, she went off the drug periodically, which led to seven or eight seizures a week.
What could be better then enjoying your summer nights with this dish? For those of you who love fish dishes in the summer, this recipe will be for you! This amazing dish is easy to prepare and will give you an amazing medicated salmon that your friends will absolutely adore. The following recipe will make four servings so if you plan on making it for more or less, be sure to adjust the ingredients accordingly.
There is no easier way to ingest too much marijuana than by eating it. Sometimes people are impatient and think “it’s not working” and eat more. By the time it all kicks in they have overdone it. While “overdoses” are not dangerous in that they are never fatal, they won’t shut down your organs, they can make you feel anxious, paranoid, and/or disoriented. Dosing edibles is somewhat of an art, a lot of factors need to be taken into consideration and people’s tolerances run a wide range. An amount that one person does not even physically feel might be enough to make someone else experience couch-lock for hours. When cooking with marijuana, especially new plant material you are not familiar with, it’s a good idea to vape or smoke a little to get general idea of its potency.  Keep in mind that cooking can intensify potency somewhat. If you do find a batch of your edibles is more potent than you intended the remedy is easy – eat less! Learn more about dosing when cooking with marijuana at this link.
This 6-year-old cookbook is from High Times magazine, the pot-championing publication founded in 1974. The book collects recipes from various sources (cooks who’ve contributed to the magazine, a “dude from Texas”) and begins with a workmanlike introduction that covers some of the basics of working with and consuming cannabis. But those basics are minimal; strains of cannabis, relative potency and issues of temperature and decarboxylation aren’t covered. Dosing in the recipes is also vague: a recipe, for example, says it “stones 4,” and there’s no mention of how many mgs are in the servings. The recipes are fun, and hardly technically difficult: the chocolate layer cake calls for Betty Crocker cake mix and frosting. If the Munchies book is for hipster stoners, this one is for people who’ve been listening to their Cheech and Chong records on vinyl since the last time it was cool.
Remove the dough from the fridge and let it heat up for a few minutes before rolling it. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Flour a flat surface and roll the dough until it is 1/8th of an inch thick. Stick the dough back in the fridge for about 5 minutes. This will make it easier to cut the cookies out with your gingerbread (or whatever shape) cutter. Cut out your little gingerbread people and place them on an ungreased baking sheet. Stick them in the over until they are crisp, but not crispy. They should be a really nice gold color. Probably around 10 minutes or so. Take the cookies out and let them cool. Proceed to decorate them how you’d like!
How would you recommend carboxylating/activating the cannabinoid that can’t be metabolized without such processes? I read somewhere that the temperature required for that is around 240 F, but I’m unsure about whether or not this would be critical for cooking. I normally make brownies and I suspect that baked goods probably don’t get anywhere near that temperature in the center. I like the idea of having water in with the oil, but I don’t want to limit the efficacy of my oil. Do you think that I could heat the oil to 240 F after I strain It?
This first-ever cookbook from High Times magazine—the world’s most trusted name when it comes to getting stoned—is the deliciously definitive guide to cannabis-infused cooking. Easy, accessible recipes and advice demystify the experience of cooking with grass and offer a cornucopia of irie appetizers and entrees, stoner sweets, cannabis cocktails, and high-holiday feasts for any occasion, from Time Warp Tamales and Sativa Shrimp Spring Rolls to Pico de Ganja Nachos and Pineapple Express Upside-Down Cake. Delectable color photos and recipes inspired by stoner celebrities such as Snoop Dogg, Cheech and Chong, and Willie Nelson will spark the interest of experienced cannabis cooks and “budding” chefs, whether they’re looking for the perfect midnight munchie or just to take dinner to a higher level.
Concocting your own pot brownies has long been a haphazard and inexact science for recreational stoners—instructions will vary on the amount of bud and method of infusion, and often DIY cannabis cooks pay no mind to the potency of the strain they're using. And while residents living in states where medical marijuana is legalized can buy a wide-range of dank, delicious edibles from dispensaries, the average pot enthusiast is more likely to dump an ounce of mids into some brownie batter than whip up something digestible if left to his own devices in an amateur cannabis kitchen.
I love the taste of smoked or vaped cannabis. I do not like the taste of it in my food. Most people do not, but I know a handful of folks who do. But from a culinary/flavor profile/foodie perspective, most often the flavor of cannabis does not enhance most recipes. Your taking offense to this is the equivalent of getting mad at someone because they don’t like the flavor of broccoli, or beer, or whatever. It’s just silly. If you like it, more power to you, cannabis cooking is a whole lot easier for you. But most of my readers do not like a strong cannabis flavor in their food and neither do I.
Mary Poppins wasn’t just blowing smoke when she sang, “Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.” There’s proof lining the shelves of dispensaries across the country, and the choices in infused edibles have never been better. But for some patients, it’s more complicated than choosing between Dr. Robert’s Chocolate Trip Cookie and Compassion Edibles’ Traditional French Chocolate Tainted Truffles. People with special dietary …
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