As long as the infused oil or fat is not used directly on high heat, such as in a hot pan or skillet for frying, the potency should hold or only slightly diminish. Always heat your fat or oil to the temperature a hot beverage such as coffee or tea is served at — 160 degrees F (71.1 degrees C) to 185 degrees F (85 degrees C). Alcohol does not need to be preheated.
Edibles can be made using nearly any cannabis product; buds, trim, kief, solventless hash, solvent-based concentrates, or reclaim. we have even used the washed trim from an ice water hash extraction to make edibles. Just note that the quality and potency of your starting material will play a large roll in the strength of your edibles. Thus, edibles made from cured, ground buds will be significantly stronger than the same batch derived from already-been-vaped (ABV) buds. Be mindful of whether your starting material is indica, sativa, or hybrid so you can anticipate the effects it will induce. You can also seek out starting material with a specific cannabinoid profile, i.e. selecting the ratios of THC and CBD that induce the desired effects and are effective in treating your symptoms or ailment. Note that CBD-only edibles will be non-psychoactive, whereas THC-rich edibles are very psychoactive. If you only have access to high-THC starting material and you seek relief without the psychoactivty, we recommend juicing raw cannabis.
Once you have BHO-infused butter, Catalano suggests a few easy homemade edibles. Make a quick honey spread for two pieces of toast by mixing a half-teaspoon of BHO butter with one tablespoon raw honey and a pinch of cinnamon. In sauce or stew recipes, use one half-teaspoon of BHO butter for each individual serving size. If you feel like baking, here’s an additional step to a baked apple recipe. When baking a large stuffed apple, use one half-teaspoon of BHO butter for each apple. That sounds delicious! XO

During Saturday's class, Charley Wheelock, the chocolate maker who taught Sugar High with Hukill, gave students a brief history of chocolate before diving deep into his passion for infused goodies. He initially got some flak from other chocolate makers when he said he wanted to partner with Serra. But pot culture is here for the long-term, and he’s determined that his kitchen be at the forefront of that movement. 

A friend lab tested a batch of brownies that had plain kief stirred into the batter as opposed to kief that had been first decarboxylated.  He found the latter to be about 30% more potent.  It’s easy to do, just put your kief or hash in an oven proof dish and heat for about 20 minutes at 250 degrees F.  Remove from oven, cool and you are ready to use for cooking.
Montrose, a bearded redhead with glasses and a professorial air, sat down in front of the vaporizer. The marijuana industry, as a former black-market business, still lacks the governing bodies and institutions of, say, the wine world, a situation that the Trichome Institute is hoping to remedy. “Most cannabis cups are just complete, utter bullshit,” Montrose said. “There’s no standard for who’s certified to be doing the judging, what the platform is, and how you quantify cannabis quality.” He and his partners had developed a “sommelier program for cannabis,” to teach people to classify plants by their structures and by compounds that produce fragrance, called terpenes, rather than by strain names. “In each cannabis sample, there are actually sixty to a hundred different types of cannabinoids, two hundred different types of terpenes, and, like, a dozen flavonoids,” he said. “That ratio combination is what makes you feel what you feel.” The institute had created an in-house smartphone app to help grade weed, and the three men had spent the day using it to judge the entries in the Dope Cup competition. “We look at the trichomes, the ripeness, the flush factor, the cola structures, the style, and the stigma,” he said, referring to various biological features of the plant. “All that is done completely sober.”
Combine all your ingredients in a pan on low and heat for 30 minutes.  It’s important to not let the mixture bubble, as this could destroy cannabinoids.  Transfer the mixture to the refrigerator and let sit overnight.  The hash butter will rise to the top.  Remove from water and measure to know how much butter you have and the strength of the butter.  You can then use this hash butter with your recipes, or even just put it on a piece of toast and consume.  Some people greatly enjoy the taste, while others want to just get it down the hatch.  As with all edibles, dosing is important so make sure you measure it carefully, then try a piece and wait two hours before redosing.
There are other things that you can add in to this recipe, depending on how you like your caramel. It’s possible to coat the candies with salt or even add dried fruit in to the mixture when making in order to add some extra flavor to your treats. Halloween is coming faster than most people realize so if you’re having a party, these treats are going to be a hit!
Turn your love of cooking and cannabis into an art form and learn how to make delicious cannabis-infused meals! Located at a fully-equipped cooking school, professional chef Patrick Bailey will guide you in the sophisticated art of cooking with cannabis. Learn everything you need to know about cooking with cannabis during this 2.5 hour, hands-on cannabis cooking class.
Andrea Drummer is a Los Angeles-based culinary school grad and private chef specializing in cannabis cooking. Maybe because of her culinary training, the book is short on the science of cooking with cannabis and long on recipes, including some fun ones such as kimchi fried rice and escargot in puff pastry. This is both good and bad, as the recipes for infused stock, pasta dough and mayonnaise are comforting for home cooks, but the book doesn’t give much information about how to work with or use cannabis. (There’s also no index, which is frustrating.) Although Drummer gives bud pairings, as if she’s talking about a good Cabernet, decarboxylation isn’t even mentioned; recipes simply call for grams of “cannabis product.” This assumes a lot, and unless you’re already versed in this kind of cooking, you’ll need outside reference in order to use this one properly.

Hello from the Yukon Territory. I’m a senior citizen and relatively new to this edibles game. I’ve started growing my own, outdoors, without too much fanfare. My plants (about 1/2 doz) make a few buds, that are far from high quality. All I do is dry my plants, grind them up in a food processor till close to the consistency of flour, and make small cookies. I use a half teaspoon for measuring the batter–cute little green ovals. My niece and I call them “beetles”. I’m happy with the buzz I get, and it helps with a few aches and pains I get from my senior age, but reading here and elsewhere, I see there is a lot more to the science behind it all. I’m also realizing that a lot of you may find it perhaps crude that I just cook with the pot the way I do, but I’m happy with the simplicity, and will probably continue with this method. However, do I deduce correctly, that my finished product will be better if I heat my dried and ground pot first in the oven, for 20 minutes at 250 degrees, before I make my beetles?
“If you’re stoned, it’s highly entertaining,” says cannabis chocolatier and co-host Vanessa Lavorato. The summer before Bong Appétit started filming, Lavorato says she slowly built up her tolerance to edibles, so she could better handle herself while stoned on air. In the end, all her hard work didn’t matter much. “You can’t hide it. You’re just really high on camera, which hopefully is funny for people.”

In most instances, oil will rise to the top of the water but won’t solidify.  No problem.  You can use a spoon to skim the oil off the water.  Even better is a kitchen gadget called a gravy separator that looks like a small pitcher with the spout originating on the bottom.  This unique design allows the water to be poured out while retaining every drop of the oil floating at the top.  During the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, gravy separators are sold everywhere, otherwise find them at gourmet shops.  You can also find extra large gravy separators year round at restaurant supply stores.
 Next, fill a large pan with the vegetable oil and let that get nice and hot. Remember to be careful when handling hot oi,l it has a tendancy to be mean and pop around when it’s hot. You’ll know the oil is the right temperature if you put a small drop of batter in, and it starts to sizzle and turn brown, now it’s ready to start cooking your special bananas.

Many people know to decarboxylate cannabis in the oven first, but it’s worth noting here for anyone who doesn’t know or doesn’t see the point in doing so. You can skip this step and add your raw cannabis to the slow cooker to decarb in the oil, but you might find that this longer oil soak simply worsens the taste of your cannabis oil. It’s also more difficult to control the temperature in a slow cooker and you risk burning off essential cannabinoids, but in an oven, you can set the temperature low and keep it steady.
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