Take Viceland’s Bong Appétit, by far the biggest hit of the genre. Last year, it was nominated for a James Beard award, a top honor in the cooking world. The first two seasons featured dreamy sequences about sourcing local ingredients, bite-sized lessons in how to infuse various fats and oils with marijuana and, at the end of each episode, a giggle-ridden dinner party populated by the kind of chill stoners who would never judge you for being too high. (I found this out when I appeared on an episode that aired last summer.)
The first chapter of the book is the basic recipes, such as THC oil, cannabutter, tinctures, glycerites, marijuana flour, etc. This is the most important and most useful section of the book. Much like the five French mother sauces, once you've figured out how to make these base items, the rest of the book is pretty much the same as any other cookbook. In fact, you could probably adapt just about anything you'd find in the Joy of Cooking by replacing the oil or butter with an infused version.
Cooking at home with cannabis does not have to be a game of Russian Roulette. It is important, especially if trying a new recipe, to test the octane! Check out how strong your infused oil is on yourself. Just take a small teaspoon of your newly infused fat as a personal dose. Wait an hour. This will help you determine how strong the batch is. Then use accordingly.
I love the taste of smoked or vaped cannabis. I do not like the taste of it in my food. Most people do not, but I know a handful of folks who do. But from a culinary/flavor profile/foodie perspective, most often the flavor of cannabis does not enhance most recipes. Your taking offense to this is the equivalent of getting mad at someone because they don’t like the flavor of broccoli, or beer, or whatever. It’s just silly. If you like it, more power to you, cannabis cooking is a whole lot easier for you. But most of my readers do not like a strong cannabis flavor in their food and neither do I.
In the microwave, melt the last two cups of chocolate chips and butter. When the mixture is smooth, drop a few of the frozen balls in at a time and stir vigorously. Quickly remove the balls and place on a wax paper lined cookie sheet. Let them cool and harden, then wrap them or eat them as desired. You can buy fancy wrappings for these and use them as stocking stuffers or you can eat them yourself or even serve them at parties! Enjoy!
When you do this, you need to make sure that the butter never boils. By keeping it at a low simmer, you extract more THC from the material than if you boil it. I usually leave my butter on the stove for 7 minutes, until the kitchen smells almost like almonds. It’s a weird smell but I have a knack for cooking with weed and I’m telling you, buttery weed on the stove smells like almonds. Add the butter and bud to your cake mix. You can strain it with a coffee filter if you feel that your grinder didn’t do the whole job.
Lower the power of the mixer and add in 1 cup of flower, constantly beating, then add 1/2 cup of buttermilk, beating again to make sure that everything is mixing together well. Add in another cup of flour, beating, and then add in the last of the buttermilk, continuously beating. Then add in the remaining flour, pouring it slowly. Continue to beat until the mixture is mixed together well. Remember to get the mix that gets stuck up on the side of the bowl. Grab a stirring instrument and put the beater down. Stir in the lemon juice and lemon zest. Take the mixture and slowly pour it in to the previously greased pan until the pan is three quarters full. Make sure that the batter is even in the pan.

Take the sugar, syrup, and water and mix them together in a pot. Set it on the stove over a medium heat and stir them together until they ingredients dissolve. The mixture should begin to boil after a bit. Make sure that all of your ingredients have been mixed well! After the mixture begins to boil, slowly add the color and flavoring to the pot. Your mixture should be heated to about 300 degrees. This part is a little tricky because you have add the tincture very quickly. Speed is necessary at this part in the process because the liquid solidifies as soon as it begins to cool. Once you’ve quickly stirred in the tincture, pour the liquid in to your molds and let them set.
This is a very important, but often overlooked step in the edible baking process. For those who are unfamiliar, the cannabinoids present is your starting material likely exist in their acidic, non-activated form. What does this mean? It means that THCa (‘a’ signifies acid) for instance, maintains many of the therapeutic properties associated with THC but NOT its psychoactive properties. Thus, if you desire the typical ‘high’ associated with edibles, you need to decarboxylate, or activate, your cannabinoids prior to infusing. Although the decarboxylation process begins immediately following the plant’s harvest, it must be accelerated with heat to ensure that all of the cannabinoids have converted from their acidic to their activated forms. For reference, this same process of decarboxylation is what occurs when you light up a one hitter or joint of cannabis.
Take 1/4 or 1/2 teaspoon of your oil as a personal dose and add it to a food or drink. Wait an hour and see how you feel. This will help you determine what an appropriate single dose would be. Once you’ve determined how much oil yields your desired effects, multiply that dose per serving if making a shareable batch (if making a cake, pizza, a pitcher, etc.). Or simply scoop that perfect dose onto each individual dish (if infusing a plate of pasta, a cup of coffee, a piece of toast, etc.).
×