Terpenes are aroma and flavor compounds found in all kinds of plant foods, such as cinnamon, oregano, and lemons. Cannabis shares certain terpenes with mangoes, black pepper, and rosemary, and different strains of cannabis have different terpenes. It’s not unusual for cannabis sold in dispensaries to come with tasting notes, like a glass of wine, and a company in Amsterdam even has a detailed “flavor wheel” of available strains with flavors as specific as “Tabasco” and “bread fruit.” Sayegh and others believe terpenes, like cannabinoids, shape the high and have therapeutic benefits—from calming to euphoric—and will pick and choose strains based on that. Some studies have supported this direct connection between flavor and effect, but, as with many aspects of cannabis, research has been limited by the plant’s legal status.
In a legal state, home cooks have access not only to lab-tested fresh product but sometimes also to lab-tested butters and oils. Some who prefer to infuse at home rely on online potency calculators, of which there are several. Sites like Wikileaf catalog the potency of different strains, and home potency-testing tools are starting to hit the market.
Put the half-and-half, cannamilk, cornstarch, salt, and sugar in to a large saucepan and whisk everything together thoroughly. Cook the mixture over medium heat while constantly stirring until it starts to thicken, about ten minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and set it aside. In a seperate container, whisk together the eggs and gradually add in a cup of the cannacream from the saucepan. Place the hot cannacream and to yolk mixture in to the saucepan and continue to whisk it constantly.
First, use a coffee grinder to turn your herb in to a fine powder. As always, the drier the herb, the better. When the herb is ground up, add it in to the crockpot and add the glycerin. It’s best to use a crockpot that has a “Warm” setting. If the tincture is boiling, more THC will dissipate, creating a lesser effect with the end product. Leave the tincture on warm for 24 hours. Stir it occasionally. You can also test it but BE CAREFUL! Glycerin holds heat in and gets extremely hot! Don’t burn yourself.
These recipes are so obviously yummy that I bought the book even though medication is not a goal for my cooking. The recipes are sophisticated but not overly complicated. Instructions are crystal clear in an accessible and easy-to-use visual and written style. The cannabis specific tips and basic methods and recipes are clearly just what the doctor ordered for anyone wanting to make medicated dishes that taste wonderful. This book full of recipes is good enough to stand alone, and light years beyond the miserable excuses for brownies that used to be the limit in this category. The recipes I made were both easy and delicious.
Remove the dough from the food processor and wrap it in plastic. Place the dough in the refrigerator until it is cold all the way through. Get a cookie sheet and grease it with some cooking spray, then roll the dough out on the tray so that it covers the whole pan. Next, you can either use a Goldfish cookie cutter or one of your choosing (I know that they make weed shaped ones, even though the crackers will be orange). These crackers are delicious. Plus, since they’re medicated, they make a good middle-of-your-shift snack if you’re having a rough day at work. Or they’re good to munch on while watching a movie. I highly suggest that you try these crackers if you’re feeling up to baking one day. Not only that, but since you’ll have leftover dough, you can make smaller, shapeless crackers that are also medicated.
Terpenes are aroma and flavor compounds found in all kinds of plant foods, such as cinnamon, oregano, and lemons. Cannabis shares certain terpenes with mangoes, black pepper, and rosemary, and different strains of cannabis have different terpenes. It’s not unusual for cannabis sold in dispensaries to come with tasting notes, like a glass of wine, and a company in Amsterdam even has a detailed “flavor wheel” of available strains with flavors as specific as “Tabasco” and “bread fruit.” Sayegh and others believe terpenes, like cannabinoids, shape the high and have therapeutic benefits—from calming to euphoric—and will pick and choose strains based on that. Some studies have supported this direct connection between flavor and effect, but, as with many aspects of cannabis, research has been limited by the plant’s legal status.

Robyn Griggs Lawrence cares about your well-being. As a former editor of Natural Home magazine, she wrote a number of books on healthy living before making her foray into the culinary cannabis world. Her “Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook,” which has a foreword written by Women Grow co-founder Jane West, gathers wholesome recipes and tips from chefs across the country on making edibles that are vegan, vegetarian, raw and gluten-free. The book includes cameos from Scott Durrah, a co-found of Denver cannabis cooking company Simply Pure, and Catjia Redfern, co-founder of MegaMints, among others.

“Oh, yeah. There’s a lot more shit weed than there is high-quality cannabis.”The edible portion of the evening commenced. In the dining room, the conversation turned, inevitably, to the subject of the Times columnist Maureen Dowd, who, in 2014, shortly after the first licensed cannabis retailers opened for business, travelled to Denver and bought a cannabis chocolate bar. Back in her hotel room, she ate part of the bar, and then, when she felt nothing, ate some more. She described what happened next in that week’s column:
"This book is not a hodge-podge of information, it is carefully constructed to bring simplicity into your life, should you choose to medicate yourself using edibles....this book makes it sensible to experiment with the luscious sounding recipes that would be right at home-even in a non-cannabis kitchen."―Warren Bobrow, mixologist, chef, and author of Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails, and Tonics: The Art of Spirited Drinks and Buzz-Worthy Libations. www.cocktailwhisperer.com
Cannabis oil extracted via heat and pressure can be used in topicals or ingested by itself orally, but the taste and consistency leave a lot to be desired. The most common way to consume cannabis oil, also known as “concentrate” or “dab,” is by vaporizing or smoking it, but it can also act as an ingredient for an easier method of making weed butter. By simply melting the dab with some butter or oil at a low temperature, mixing them into one substance, you’ve made marijuana butter! Keep in mind, however, that cannabis oil needs to adhere to the same temperature cap of 245 degrees Fahrenheit to minimize the destruction of the THC. One downside to cooking with butter derived from cannabis oil versus marijuana is the stickiness of the product—certain types of oil can leave behind a difficult residue on cookware. (For those reading this tip too late, try rescuing your pan with 99% isopropyl alcohol! It’s super effective.)
I usually cook them in the oven at 325 for about 15-20 minutes, checking on them occasionally. When finished, these incredible treats will either get you super baked or be a reasonably simple thing to make when you’re staring at the baking section in the grocery store. I promise that you’ll love these things, even if you don’t like chocolate (like myself). You can’t go wrong mixing a cookie with a brownie and candy. These are also amazing when served with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. Make these (medicated) and invite a few friends over. You’ll impress them and get them stoned!

All cannabis oil packaging must also state the percentage of THC and CBD in the oil (so you know how potent and psychotropic it is before you use it). Just like strains of dried cannabis, oils can have stronger concentrations of CBD, THC, or be more balanced, and thus create very different experiences. Not all oils are created equal – so reading the packaging is crucial for your first time. 


Wolf places herself in the last category, but she admitted that her heart is with the hippies. She seemed troubled by the men of the Trichome Institute. Though they were obviously “passionate” about cannabis, she worried that they were a marketing operation. “ ‘Budtender’ classes online!” she moaned. She especially disliked a plan to regularize the grading system for cannabis. “To me, it’s like picking a baby,” Wolf said. “Like saying, ‘Well, you definitely want your baby to be blond, but maybe with green eyes.’ It feels so removed from the community aspect of this business. It’s making it soulless.”
Melissa Parks, a classically trained chef who once worked in research and development for General Mills, is now the executive chef of Las Vegas-based edibles company Vert. She once orchestrated a dinner where she paired tokes of cannabis with dishes that complemented their terpenes. She married a particularly earthy strain called Bio-Diesel (“It had smells of when you drive into a forest over dirt with pine needles”) with a cocoa- and coffee-crusted pork tenderloin in sour cherry beurre blanc.
Topicals enter the skin and body tissues and allow for direct application and relief of affected areas for allergic skin reactions, muscle strain, inflammation, swelling, etc. Both THC and CBD have been found to provide pain relief and reduce inflammation – but do your research on your particular condition to find out what would work best for you – and, as always, experiment slowly.

Using oils under the tongue (holding it there for a minute to let them sink in) will provide the quickest effects, but most will still only kick in from 1-2 hours from the time you take it – and can last for as long as 6-10 hours in some cases. The initial onset and duration of cannabis oil is much longer than vaping or smoking because it’s absorbed through the digestive system and bloodstream, and it’s not recommended to take a second dose (whether edible or sublingual) until 4 solid hours have gone by.


If you plan on using it immediately, obviously you’ll want a recipe ready. Simply use the cannabis oil to replace part of the oil called for in the recipe. Since you don’t know what the potency is, make sure you start low and go slow with your first couple of culinary creations. You can start with maybe a half to one ounce of oil until you feel comfortable with the strength.
There is absolutely no single way to answer that question. Not even close. What kind of edibles? Plus at what dosage? Everyone is drastically different. Check out the articles on dosing on this website and also my free edibles dosing class at http://www.Cannademy.com. The beauty of making your own is you get to make the exact edibles you like at the dosage YOU individually need.
You could eat a pound of raw cannabis and not get high. That’s because the main functional ingredient in a cannabis bud is in the form of a compound called tetrahydrocannabinolic acid, or THCA. THCA has no psychoactive effect. But delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, does. Applying heat to THCA kicks off a process called decarboxylation, which transforms it into THC.  When cannabis is smoked, THCA converts to THC along the way, and the process is largely taken for granted. Basically, every pot smoker, from a cancer patient to a teenage toker, embarks on an act of chemistry when they flick the lighter. But if you want to eat it instead of smoke it, things get more complicated. The most common way people decarboxylate, or “decarb,” cannabis for cooking is by toasting it on low heat (240 degrees Fahrenheit/116 degrees Celsius is a commonly recommended temperature) in an oven.

With such an awesome title, how can you not be intrigued as to how to make this amazing holiday treat? It’s medicated, delicious, and can make the perfect addition to a holiday party or as a present. These cookies are your normal medicated chocolate chip cookies but with a twist! Theres vanilla pudding added in as well, giving these cookies a different taste then what most people are used to. This will definitely give you the upper hand at winning who makes the best cannabis cookies!
If you prefer to use butter next time instead of oil, the preparation is virtually identical, but you’ll want to start out with a single stick of salted butter and you’ll want to simmer it between 8 to 24 hours if using the slow cook method. Use about a quarter to a half ounce of weed per stick of butter. Butters can be great because it can be more versatile than cooking with oil. You can even add butter to your toast!
Even though Memorial Day has passed in the States, the barbecues aren’t quite over yet! The 4th of July has yet to happen and there are plenty of weekends left with beautiful weather! Looking to spice up your usually normal barbecue with some cannabis fun? This recipe will teach you how to infuse your BBQ sauce with cannabis, not only giving you a great sauce but also an awesome way to medicate this summer.
Because alcohol extractions are typically used for tinctures, we will focus on fat based extractions for traditional edibles. For increased bioavailability, we suggest using coconut oil, which is high in medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). The reason being that MCTs are small, and easily digested relative to the long chain triglycerides (LCTs) found in most fatty foods (olive oil, canola oil or butter). Unlike other types of fats, MCTs don’t need to be broken down before they’re used for energy, and they don’t require any extra energy to digest or absorb. This makes the use of coconut oil especially helpful for those who suffer from impaired fat digestion and gallbladder issues. Note the MCT oil, which is comprised of 100% MCTs, can also be used.

Edibles can be made using nearly any cannabis product; buds, trim, kief, solventless hash, solvent-based concentrates, or reclaim. we have even used the washed trim from an ice water hash extraction to make edibles. Just note that the quality and potency of your starting material will play a large roll in the strength of your edibles. Thus, edibles made from cured, ground buds will be significantly stronger than the same batch derived from already-been-vaped (ABV) buds. Be mindful of whether your starting material is indica, sativa, or hybrid so you can anticipate the effects it will induce. You can also seek out starting material with a specific cannabinoid profile, i.e. selecting the ratios of THC and CBD that induce the desired effects and are effective in treating your symptoms or ailment. Note that CBD-only edibles will be non-psychoactive, whereas THC-rich edibles are very psychoactive. If you only have access to high-THC starting material and you seek relief without the psychoactivty, we recommend juicing raw cannabis.
When choosing a strain to use in your bake, consider the effects each strain offers. Indicas usually offer profound relaxation while sativas are more stimulating. If you want to treat anxiety and pain, you might want an indica. If instead you want to address fatigue, a sativa might be more appropriate. There are as many different strains of these basic categories as there are vendors and the different strains offer different experiences. One way to tell a potent strain is by smell. You want a potent and deep aroma from the strain you choose. You may have to test different strains for  thc edibles and ask other users and vendors what effects each give to find the strains that are right for you.
Yes indeed, it is important to dose homemade edibles accurately! First, let’s cover a couple of points about butane hash oil (BHO), safety and health. Double-check the laws to make sure you are legal to make BHO at home. The Colorado state law (HB 15-1305) that went into effect in July 2015 bans the manufacturing of marijuana concentrates by an unlicensed person using “an inherently hazardous substance” such as flammable butane. Unlawful manufacturing is now a Class 2 drug felony.
Our products have intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of cannabis infused products. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.
It’s 2 sticks, so 8 ounces, a little less because some of it isn’t going to come off the weed. Try about 2-3 grams initially and work up or down from there. If it’s not strong enough, throw more weed in it next time. You can also run it through again with more weed to make it stronger. I did it once 3 times, using altogether about an ounce of weed, and a gram of it made my wife and I hallucinate so hard we had to take a cab home from the bar, 15 minutes after we got there. Don’t do that.
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