I can’t say that I’m a huge fan of mayo but working in the food business has shown me that it’s probably the single most popular condiment out there. People put mayo with everything. They’ll put it on subs, dip their fries in it, put it in the calzones and on their pizza. It’s insane how much people like mayo. So here’s this recipe for mayo that will taste awesome and it will also give you a little buzz. The recipe is really easy but just know that you will need cannabis oil so have some of the on hand before you start.

Any recipe that calls for butter or oil can be substituted with cannabis-infused coconut oil. The one thing to keep in mind when cooking with cannabis infused oil is to keep the oven/stove temperatures at or below 300°F. As temperatures begin to exceed 315°F, you risk inadvertently vaporizing your precious cannabinoids. If a baking recipe calls for a temperature of 350+°F, we recommend baking at 300°F and extending the baking time accordingly (even if that means 30+ minutes longer).


Just to be clear you can decarb your dry ice hash/kief and then mix it into dishes that don’t need cooking? I just made awesome tempered almond chocolates with 3 grams of kief, seems potent so far. With my honeys and maple syrup seems like it would be better not to heat them for so long if the hash is already decarbed. I have had problems using plant materials and getting mold so I turned all the trim we had into CO2 hash! We have over 200 grams so I can cook with it. It’s also super potent in my vaporizer.
Mary Poppins wasn’t just blowing smoke when she sang, “Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.” There’s proof lining the shelves of dispensaries across the country, and the choices in infused edibles have never been better. But for some patients, it’s more complicated than choosing between Dr. Robert’s Chocolate Trip Cookie and Compassion Edibles’ Traditional French Chocolate Tainted Truffles. People with special dietary …
Wolf advocates a cautious approach. “Our philosophy is ‘less is more,’ ” she said. “Figure out the littlest bit of cannabis that will get you to a good place and start with that.” The Trichome guys agreed. “Cannabis education is the most necessary thing in this industry, across the board!” Montrose said, piously. He talked about having a “number,” as for a Sleep Number bed. “I’m an eighty-milligram dude. I know my edible tolerance, because I’ve dialled it in so precisely,” he said. “I know that if I want a really pleasant experience, a relaxing, pain-relieving experience, eighty milligrams is perfect for me. If I want to go to sleep? One hundred and twenty milligrams. If I want to keep working? Fifteen milligrams.”
Process:In a small mason jar mix in 1 gram High CBD Hash Oil to 3 fl. oz. of high-proof alcohol. Seal lid on the jar and shake vigorously. Place mixture into freezer. Leave for a minimum of 5 days shaking the jar twice daily and placing back in the freezer. Using a coffee filter and a separate container, strain the liquid removing any impurities (there should be very little solids). Pour the tincture into the 1 fl. oz.  eyedroppers.
Okay so this is the first time that I made tincture so this recipe isn’t perfect. I’m working on making it better but keep in mind that you can change the above recipe to see how you see fit. You can definitely add more marijuana and glycerin. Adjust the recipe to your liking. I got 11 fl oz of tincture from this recipe. Next time, I plan on using 32 fl oz glycerin with 28 grams of actual bud. This way, the tincture should be a little bit stronger.

Combine all your ingredients in a pan on low and heat for 30 minutes.  It’s important to not let the mixture bubble, as this could destroy cannabinoids.  Transfer the mixture to the refrigerator and let sit overnight.  The hash butter will rise to the top.  Remove from water and measure to know how much butter you have and the strength of the butter.  You can then use this hash butter with your recipes, or even just put it on a piece of toast and consume.  Some people greatly enjoy the taste, while others want to just get it down the hatch.  As with all edibles, dosing is important so make sure you measure it carefully, then try a piece and wait two hours before redosing.
Lower the power of the mixer and add in 1 cup of flower, constantly beating, then add 1/2 cup of buttermilk, beating again to make sure that everything is mixing together well. Add in another cup of flour, beating, and then add in the last of the buttermilk, continuously beating. Then add in the remaining flour, pouring it slowly. Continue to beat until the mixture is mixed together well. Remember to get the mix that gets stuck up on the side of the bowl. Grab a stirring instrument and put the beater down. Stir in the lemon juice and lemon zest. Take the mixture and slowly pour it in to the previously greased pan until the pan is three quarters full. Make sure that the batter is even in the pan.
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I don’t know about any of you stoners out there but I personally love Goldfish. I really just love snacks. I also love the fact that not only are stoners incredibly brilliant when it come to making snacks, but the recipes always seem to be so simple that everyone can try them in the comfort of their own home. The following recipe will not only let you make your own Goldfish snacks but they’re medicated. These make perfect solo snacks or (since they’re moldable), for parties. Trust me, these little crackers look really good on a plate. Enjoy this recipe for medicate Goldfish crackers, my fellow stoners!
You must be 21 years of age to attend our experiences. Please make sure to bring your non-expired ID, or State issued License. Temporary IDs cannot be used to validate entry into dispensaries and/or grow facilities. Non-US Citizens must present a valid passport to enter cannabis businesses. These are the rules of the Marijuana Enforcement Division.
Laurie & MaryJane’s brownies went on sale in February. They come in packages of five, which sell for twenty to thirty-three dollars, depending on potency. Wolf currently has them in thirty-five dispensaries and has developed new products: an almond-cake bite, a chocolate truffle, and a soon-to-be-launched savory cheese crisp. Ultimately, she hopes to conquer Oregon—and then to try for California. “The dream is to be everywhere it’s legal,” Wolf said, sounding a bit Big Weed herself. “To be the Mrs. Fields of cannabis foods.”
Bake these little cakes in a muffin pan. I don’t know if they make little mini cake pans. But if they do, use those. It just gets kind of complicated if you fill the muffin tin up too high with batter because the outside edge slants. This makes it difficult when stacking the individual cakes to make the full one. Cook them in the over for about 10 minutes at 350. After then 10 minutes, check the cakes with a toothpick and make sure that they’re cooked all the way through.
With an easy and more precise dosage method, medical cannabis oils are ideal for oral consumption. However, they can be just as effortlessly added to what you’re eating. Because our extraction process includes decarboxylation, there is no need to decarb the oil on your own before cooking like you have to with dried flower. This means you can just add the oil to basically anything without any fuss or extra time. To add your oil into a food, simply measure your dosage as you normally would do with the syringe and add that specific amount to your recipe. If you’re cooking for one, you only need one dose. If you’re making a large batch, multiple your single dose by how many servings you are creating. (For example, if you’re making a dozen brownies you’ll want to add twelve times your single-use dose.) Ensure you mix thoroughly to distribute your medical cannabis evenly throughout your recipe.
Edibles are steadily gaining popularity in North America but are currently illegal for purchase or distribution here in Canada. Until the government adds edibles to the list of what can be sold, making your own is a simple and legal option. Edibles are foods that incorporate cannabis through cooking or baking and can be made at home through a variety of methods, including using traditional dried flower, our Maker’s Mix products or the Emblem Cannabis Oils.

Let’s face it, stoners are some of the most health conscious people around these days and we do whatever we can to stay and be healthy. It doesn’t stop at just smoking cannabis. The stoner diet is very important. I stumbled upon this amazingly delicious recipe for baked kale chips that are not only good for your health but will get you medicated as well.
The first course was herbed white beans with grapefruit, blood orange and asparagus with heirloom carrot, sumac, pomegranate and 2 milligrams of THC. Then came hamachi and caviar alongside asparagus rolled in hemp seed; broccoli stalks with THC-infused habanero mousse and dandelion purée; and lamb Wellington anointed with a spice rub, mint pesto, and a THC-dosed lamb jus. Eight courses and 10 milligrams later, the guests had grown convivial, suit jackets slung over chairs, giggling as a live cellist played in the background. By the end, says chef Chris Sayegh, everyone was “euphoric.”
OK, this one isn’t a mistake as there is more than one way to infuse.  Some people do not like to add water to the mix, but I do.  Especially on the stovetop, the water will help things infuse at a lower temperature and avoid things burning and scorching which will result in unappetizing taste and THC that’s rendered useless by being cooked at too high a temperature. The water also helps with appearance and flavor by washing away some of the green color and strong herbal flavor.  The photo at the right shows marijuana butter made with and without water in the mix and marijuana oil made with and without water.  The same type and amount of marijuana was used for each of the infusions in the exact same amount. In all instances there was a better final yield when using water, and a lighter color and less herbal flavor.  The amount of water is not important, but I always add at least as much water as butter or oil. I do this even when infusing in the slow cooker.  Click to find instructions for how to make marijuana butter and cannabis oil.
Moriarty’s book visually demonstrates the “secret” process for creating her magical 10x Cannabutter, which replaces the bitter “grass flavor” with a tasty, nutty butter flavor. The smokin’ hot cook book includes 49 easy-to-prepare, delicious dishes that range from her signature dessert, “Blue Sky Lemon Bars”, to her “Dizzy Bird Turkey with Stuffing” – a perfect dish for festive holiday dinners.
While some purists will tell you this is hearsay, adding water to your infusing process is a nifty trick. This way, you can infuse at a lower temperature. The amount of water you add is not important, but try to use at least as much water as oil or butter. The water boils off. You can also see the difference in your “washed” end product. It is not as green.
How to Make Infused Coconut Oil Making cannabis-infused coconut oil is as simple as steeping quality herb in a quality oil. Machines are available to make cannabis-infused coconut oil, but the infusion process can be done right on a stovetop or hot plate with the help of a double boiler. What You Will Need Double boiler (you can make one if you don’t own one) ¼ to ½ ounce of cannabis 1 cup of coconut oil (organic, expeller-pressed works best for this process) 2-3 feet of cooking twine (a clean unused white shoestring will work in a pinch) Cheesecloth (about an 8” x 10” piece) TIP: A ratio of one quarter ounce of cannabis to one cup of oil is a good starting point. If you want a potent oil, high-quality flower (15%+ THC) works well. However, until you become more comfortable with the process or if you have limited funds, using shake, trim and/or kief work fine (avoid stems and seeds). Cooking Directions Prepare the “herb packet”: Lay the cheese cloth out flat Place the cannabis (breaking up larger pieces) into the middle and distribute evenly over a small area (remember the packet needs to fit into the top pan) Fold in opposite ends to cover the herb Now fold in one of the open ends, tuck and roll Tie the roll of herb tightly with cooking twine (tying a knot in one end and then guiding the twine through it works good) Fill the bottom pan of a double boiler with a few inches of water (allowing enough space so that it does not touch the top pan) and set the shallow pan on top. Place over medium heat to a gentle boil - NOT a rolling boil. Add 1 cup of coconut oil to the top pan. When the coconut oil is almost melted, add about 1 cup of water so that the liquid will cover the herb packet [Note: Coconut oil is nonpolar and water is polar so they will naturally separate when chilled; and THC and CBD are not soluble in water, but are in certain carrier oils. Therefore, the coconut oil acts as the carrier and will “soak” up the cannabinoids, leaving any impurities in the water.] Continue heating the oil and water mixture until all of the coconut oil is melted and then add the herb packet - pressing down gently into the liquid using a metal spoon. Cover and leave to cook for 90 minutes, checking back every half hour or so to flip over the packet and stir it around gently. Also, check the water in the bottom pan to make sure it is not boiling too hard and that the water level is still good - be careful to avoid any escaping steam when removing the top pan. After 90 minutes, the oil and water mixture should be a deep green color. At this point, turn off the heat and remove the herb packet and place in a bowl. Squeeze out any oil that is trapped in the “herb packet” by pressing with a spoon (when it cools down, you can give it another squeeze by hand to get every drop). Add this to the liquid mixture and place in the refrigerator to cool. When the mixture is cooled, the water and oil separate (dirty looking water on the bottom and a nice green color solidified oil containing the good stuff on top). Gently poke 2 or 3 holes through the oil, turn over (holding your hand gently over the oil) and drain the water off. If you are not going to use the oil immediately, store in a container (glass preferred) and label with date, strain and ratio. This will help you determine which strains and in what quantities work best for you. The most important thing to remember is that the effects of consuming cannabis-infused coconut oil (directly or as an ingredient in a cooked dish) are usually slow-acting due to the cannabinoids having to be digested first. As such, it may take up to three (3) hours for you to feel its maximum effects, and those effects could last for awhile. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed or concerned about overdosing, don’t panic -- no one has ever died as a direct result of consuming cannabis. Choosing the Right Strain Your next choice will be determining what strain(s) of cannabis to use. The infusion process does not drastically change the effects or flavors of the variety of cannabis used. Therefore, you will want to use a cannabis strain that delivers the desired effects you want to achieve (indica, sativa, hybrid, high-CBD). Most importantly, you want to be sure that the cannabis you use is free from impurities (such as mold, fungus, bugs, and pesticides). If the cannabis is compromised, the infusion process will not correct it. Cooking Temperatures Cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are all affected differently by heat. A double boiler traps steam between the pans (provided you have a good seal) and remains steady about 212° F. The most volatile terpenes will start to evaporate around 70° F (filling the air with a pungent aroma). A majority of the remaining terpenes will begin to evaporate rapidly around 100° F. The boiling points of flavonoids range between 273.2° and 352.4° F, so the dominant flavors of the strain you use should still be evident in the infused oil. Cannabinoids, specifically THC and CBD, exist in acidic and activated forms. In the plant, these cannabinoids exist almost entirely in the acidic form and are known as THCA and CBDA. When heated, these acidic forms undergo a chemical reaction called decarboxylation that results in THCA converting to THC and CBDA converting to CBD. Complete activation occurs when heated to 220° F for 90 minutes. In theory, the double boiler cooks at 212° F, but many factors can change that number, so you may need to experiment by adding or subtracting a few minutes to achieve your desired effects. Remember, if you are going to use the oil in a recipe that will expose it to further heat, you don’t want it to be fully activated at this stage. Further, coconut oil has an average smoking point of 350° F, and can be very tricky to cook on direct heat. A double boiler cooks by steam so the oil doesn’t burn easily. Overcooking the oil compromises the fats and the taste will be most unappealing. If this happens, all you can do is throw it out, wipe the pan clean, and start over. Health Benefits Cannabis and coconut oil are what some would call the perfect pair. Coupling coconut oil, “a vegan-friendly super food,” with cannabis, “nature’s miracle plant,” makes a lot of sense. Coconut oil is a saturated oil made primarily of medium-chain fatty acids. It is safe to ingest in edible form and is easily digested. It gets its extra punch from lauric acid (C12), which comprises about 50% of the total fatty acids, and has been linked to many health benefits: reducing abdominal obesity, accelerating healing time for wounds, delivering antioxidant properties, lowering lipid components (e.g. cholesterol, triglycerides), preventing bone loss and more. Some people even use coconut oil as a daily detox. Saturated fats have gotten a bad rap for decades. They have been accused of contributing to high cholesterol, heart disease, obesity, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Much confusion and contradictory evidence exists on the subject, even among health care professionals. Professionals, like Dr. Aseem Malhotra, are trying to set the record straight. Dr. Malhotra gained attention after the publication of his peer-reviewed editorial in the 2013 British Medical Journal (BMJ), wherein he seriously challenged the conventional view on saturated fats, and found no significant association between saturated fat and cardiovascular risk. Coconut Oil Uses There are so many things you can do with cannabis infused coconut oil including: Drizzle over hot cooked pastas, grains, cereals and vegetables Great for sauces and dressings Add to hot cooked soups and stews Use as a poultry rub Pan fry foods like scrambled egg, fish, bananas, chicken Put a spoonful in your coffee, tea or hot chocolate Add to smoothies Types of Coconut Oil Organic, virgin (or extra-virgin), raw, unrefined, centrifuged and cold-pressed are all terms you want to look for when selecting a coconut oil for ingesting with no cooking or for use in low-heat cooking. These oils typically deliver a strong coconut flavor. Organic, refined, expeller-pressed and solvent-free are the terms you are looking for when selecting an oil for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, especially when using higher temperatures. These refined oils also tend to have a lighter coconut flavor. Virgin Oil: Unrefined / Centrifuged Oil True virgin oil is a centrifuged coconut oil produced without using heat. It is considered one of the highest quality oils, but also one of the most expensive coconut oils on the market today. Terms like raw, pure and unrefined are associated with virgin oils. Virgin coconut oil has a more distinct coconut flavor. It is considered by most to be extremely mild and smooth, and can be eaten right off a spoon. Producing high-quality virgin oil is timely and expensive. Using a machine (centrifuge) cooled by chilled water, coconut cream is produced from pressing the fresh, white meat of the coconut and then concentrating it to yield more and more oil while the proteins and water soluble constituents are separated out and more of the phytonutrients are preserved. Unlike olive oil and some of the other oils, there are no standards to be met in the coconut oil industry to claim extra-virgin status. It is mostly a buzz word used for marketing. Cold-pressed Oils Cold-pressed coconut oils are also often referred to as raw or unrefined. The extraction method used to produce these oils is very similar to the centrifuged method used to make virgin coconut oils. The cold-pressing method however uses a drying process, which can be accomplished using varying degrees of heat. Therefore, very few cold-pressed oils are truly virgin oils. The method of drying and amount of heat used will determine the quality and taste of the coconut oil. Oils processed at high temperatures may taste of toasted coconut, while those processed at lower temperatures tend to deliver more of a mild, raw coconut flavor. If the oil was poorly processed, it may exhibit burnt or rancid qualities. Refined or RBD Coconut Oils Most coconut oils available on the market today are refined or RBD (refined, bleached and deodorized). If a label doesn’t say it is otherwise, then it is most likely refined. These are typically the least expensive of all coconut oils. Refined coconut oil should deliver a light, delicate flavor. The refining process strips away some of the nutrients, but it doesn’t have to alter other attributes of the coconut oil (such as fatty acid profile, taste, aroma). The methods for producing refined oils varies significantly, and can be accomplished with or without harsh solvents (like lye or hexane). If a product doesn’t say it is solvent free, it is a safe bet it was chemically processed and you should avoid it. Otherwise, RBD oils are fine to use, especially for cooking. Bleaching simply refers to the filtering process to remove impurities and is generally not a chemical process. Organic usually signifies that no harsh chemicals or solvents were used in the production. Expeller-pressed Extraction Method The expeller-pressed extraction method is used to produce RBD oils. During production the coconut meat is dried (most often by sun or smoke) and then pressed in large expeller presses. The resulting coconut oil is crude and must be refined or cleaned to minimize free fatty acids, remove remaining moisture, and minimize bad flavors or aromas. Expeller-pressed coconut oils can be a good option if you do not want to pay the premium for virgin oils. They are also a good option for those who do not like the taste of coconuts, or don’t want a strong coconut flavor for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, certain foods. Just be certain that no chemicals or solvents were used in the process. MCT Oil Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are a form of saturated fatty acid that has numerous health benefits. Coconut oil is one great source of MCTs. Roughly 65% of the fatty acids in coconut oil are medium-chain triglycerides. There are four kinds of MCTs: caproic (C6), caprylic (C8), capric (C10) and lauric (C12) acids. Generally speaking, the shorter the chain (meaning the lower the number of carbons the acid has), the faster the body can turn the fatty acids into ketones (usable energy). MCT oil is not an oil found in nature, but is instead manufactured by machine. The fatty acids are extracted through an industrial process of fractionation and concentrated into MCT oil. The logic is that since MCTs are healthy, the more the better. However, lauric acid (C12) is totally void, or present only in minuscule amounts in MCT oil. This has caused much debate on the matter. One side argues that MCT oils don’t include lauric acid because it is rare and more costly to include, and the other side argues that C12 is a less efficient way to obtain energy and adds nothing extra to the product. MCT oil makers advocate using only C8 and C10 (or 100% of one or the other) because they are the most rapidly metabolized for energy. Choosing between coconut oil and MCT oil, or deciding which one is better, should not be a concern when you understand the differences. On one hand, coconut oil is high in lauric acid which has well-documented health benefits, and MCT oil has very little to offer in that way. On the other hand, MCT oil may help raise energy levels better than coconut oil, but little proof is available to validate this claim. If you do plan to use an MCT oil, be sure the label clearly lists the ingredients and discloses how it was produced. Many MCT oils are chemically altered and contain unhealthy fillers like polyunsaturated fats, and due to their refining process may use harsh solvents and chemicals in manufacturing. Storage and Shelf-Life Be sure to keep the infused oil in a container with a tight lid (insects and critters love it). A glass jar with a wide mouth works well so that you can scoop it out easily. The infused oil should be kept out of direct sunlight. It can be refrigerated, but it is not necessary. It can also be frozen, but freezing it will change the taste - sometimes for the better but sometimes for the worse. Coconut oil is very stable and depending on the kind, can last anywhere from 18 months to several years. Opinions differ on how long cannabis-infused oil can be kept. Most agree that degradation begins after 2-3 months, and sooner after repeated exposure to air (opening and shutting the jar) or overexposure to sunlight or heat. This does not mean it is unusable, but you will definitely start to notice a change in the taste and effectiveness as the cannabinoids begin to degrade.
There is no easier way to ingest too much marijuana than by eating it. Sometimes people are impatient and think “it’s not working” and eat more. By the time it all kicks in they have overdone it. While “overdoses” are not dangerous in that they are never fatal, they won’t shut down your organs, they can make you feel anxious, paranoid, and/or disoriented. Dosing edibles is somewhat of an art, a lot of factors need to be taken into consideration and people’s tolerances run a wide range. An amount that one person does not even physically feel might be enough to make someone else experience couch-lock for hours. When cooking with marijuana, especially new plant material you are not familiar with, it’s a good idea to vape or smoke a little to get general idea of its potency.  Keep in mind that cooking can intensify potency somewhat. If you do find a batch of your edibles is more potent than you intended the remedy is easy – eat less! Learn more about dosing when cooking with marijuana at this link.
The Cannabis Cookbook is the definitive guide to cooking with the world's most versatile and popular weed. What better way to sample the most popular weed on the planet than by eating it, as people have done for thousands of years? Inside The Cannabis Cookbook are over 35 delicious recipes for Stoned Starters, Mashed Main Courses, Doped-Out Deserts, Bombed-Out Beverages, and Crazy Cocktails to make meals that are both unforgettable and hard to recall.
 Now let it cook on the grill for about 8-10 minutes or until the insides are no longer pink (when checking for pinkness, pick the largest part of the chicken). If you like your grilled chicken smothered in perfectly sinful sauce, use 2 cups of honey BBQ sauce with 2 teaspoons of canna-oil and stir together, it adds a great finishing touch. This is what you would call a gourmet way to get blown, bon appetit!

Bake + get baked all holiday season with this special gift set featuring The Happy (happy!!!) Holiday Pot Cookie Cookbook by Dr. Seymour Kindbud and a trio of cookie cutters. Take your holiday traditions to a higher place with 25 recipes for tasty edibles in the form of sugar cookies, marble brownies and Mexican wedding cookies. A can’t-be-beat recipe for Ganja Butter, the cornerstone of all cannabis cooking, ensures that your sweets are equally delicious and mind altering. Perfect for getting through the holiday season with the best vibes ever. Hardcover.

I am always asked what kind of oil is best to infuse.  That depends what you are going to use it for.  A neutral oil like canola, grapeseed, or vegetable oil is most versatile as you can use it most any recipe calling for oil.  For additional flavor elements, olive oil is a great choice.  You can even infuse solid at room temperature fats like coconut oil or vegetable shortening.  Use whatever works best for what you are planning to cook with it.
and it is a gift to us to be savored and enjoyed ! When I make a butter I want people to know there’s weed in it I want it to be green I wanted to be smelly and I wanted to taste like something , I think personally you’re confusing the details of *smoking weed with the details of *eating weed yes chloroform and all that other stuff you mentioned is very bad when it comes to smoking like if you were making a hash or an extract you would definitely want to use a method that results in fewer of these but when it comes to cooking those things are good for you they have tremendous health value and you’re only screwing Yourself by cutting out the flavor and the health benefits. you’re coming across like some kind of a Stoner burn out the way your talking about this stuff .
However, making marijuana butter with concentrate is not the same as using traditional bud. Firstly, depending on how the oil is extracted, the THC can be already activated. This means you can skip the process of heating it up—it’s already ready to be used or ingested. Usually dispensaries can direct you to types of dab that have and haven’t undergone the THC activation process. Second, and perhaps more importantly, cannabis oil is an extremely concentrated (hence the nickname!) form of marijuana and can be much more effective than using regular Mary Jane. A good way to measure a comfortable dose is by simply doing the math. If a gram of cannabis oil is 70 percent THC (dispensaries usually disclose this information on the package), that means it contains 700mg of THC. With 48 teaspoons in one cup of butter, each teaspoon serving would boast 14.5mg of THC if you melted the cannabis oil gram with the butter. Most dispensaries have edibles in individual 10mg THC pieces, which is a great starting point for seeing what is comfortable. Another major difference is flavor: Some types of cannabis oil have intense flavors which carry over to whatever you’re cooking. Pick your concentrate carefully, as it can really affect the taste of the dish.
I’ve found that doing a dry ice resin gland extraction on my plant matter gives me all of the great benefits I’m seeking with zero flavor of cannabis in my edibles. You can cook it into whatever oil you choose, I prefer coconut for it saturated fat which attaches to the CBDs best, and the entire process takes about the same 75 minutes, start to finish. Theonly addition is the 2# of dry ice (~$4) per 1/8-1/4# of trimmed plant matter.
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