How to Make Infused Coconut Oil Making cannabis-infused coconut oil is as simple as steeping quality herb in a quality oil. Machines are available to make cannabis-infused coconut oil, but the infusion process can be done right on a stovetop or hot plate with the help of a double boiler. What You Will Need Double boiler (you can make one if you don’t own one) ¼ to ½ ounce of cannabis 1 cup of coconut oil (organic, expeller-pressed works best for this process) 2-3 feet of cooking twine (a clean unused white shoestring will work in a pinch) Cheesecloth (about an 8” x 10” piece) TIP: A ratio of one quarter ounce of cannabis to one cup of oil is a good starting point. If you want a potent oil, high-quality flower (15%+ THC) works well. However, until you become more comfortable with the process or if you have limited funds, using shake, trim and/or kief work fine (avoid stems and seeds). Cooking Directions Prepare the “herb packet”: Lay the cheese cloth out flat Place the cannabis (breaking up larger pieces) into the middle and distribute evenly over a small area (remember the packet needs to fit into the top pan) Fold in opposite ends to cover the herb Now fold in one of the open ends, tuck and roll Tie the roll of herb tightly with cooking twine (tying a knot in one end and then guiding the twine through it works good) Fill the bottom pan of a double boiler with a few inches of water (allowing enough space so that it does not touch the top pan) and set the shallow pan on top. Place over medium heat to a gentle boil - NOT a rolling boil. Add 1 cup of coconut oil to the top pan. When the coconut oil is almost melted, add about 1 cup of water so that the liquid will cover the herb packet [Note: Coconut oil is nonpolar and water is polar so they will naturally separate when chilled; and THC and CBD are not soluble in water, but are in certain carrier oils. Therefore, the coconut oil acts as the carrier and will “soak” up the cannabinoids, leaving any impurities in the water.] Continue heating the oil and water mixture until all of the coconut oil is melted and then add the herb packet - pressing down gently into the liquid using a metal spoon. Cover and leave to cook for 90 minutes, checking back every half hour or so to flip over the packet and stir it around gently. Also, check the water in the bottom pan to make sure it is not boiling too hard and that the water level is still good - be careful to avoid any escaping steam when removing the top pan. After 90 minutes, the oil and water mixture should be a deep green color. At this point, turn off the heat and remove the herb packet and place in a bowl. Squeeze out any oil that is trapped in the “herb packet” by pressing with a spoon (when it cools down, you can give it another squeeze by hand to get every drop). Add this to the liquid mixture and place in the refrigerator to cool. When the mixture is cooled, the water and oil separate (dirty looking water on the bottom and a nice green color solidified oil containing the good stuff on top). Gently poke 2 or 3 holes through the oil, turn over (holding your hand gently over the oil) and drain the water off. If you are not going to use the oil immediately, store in a container (glass preferred) and label with date, strain and ratio. This will help you determine which strains and in what quantities work best for you. The most important thing to remember is that the effects of consuming cannabis-infused coconut oil (directly or as an ingredient in a cooked dish) are usually slow-acting due to the cannabinoids having to be digested first. As such, it may take up to three (3) hours for you to feel its maximum effects, and those effects could last for awhile. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed or concerned about overdosing, don’t panic -- no one has ever died as a direct result of consuming cannabis. Choosing the Right Strain Your next choice will be determining what strain(s) of cannabis to use. The infusion process does not drastically change the effects or flavors of the variety of cannabis used. Therefore, you will want to use a cannabis strain that delivers the desired effects you want to achieve (indica, sativa, hybrid, high-CBD). Most importantly, you want to be sure that the cannabis you use is free from impurities (such as mold, fungus, bugs, and pesticides). If the cannabis is compromised, the infusion process will not correct it. Cooking Temperatures Cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are all affected differently by heat. A double boiler traps steam between the pans (provided you have a good seal) and remains steady about 212° F. The most volatile terpenes will start to evaporate around 70° F (filling the air with a pungent aroma). A majority of the remaining terpenes will begin to evaporate rapidly around 100° F. The boiling points of flavonoids range between 273.2° and 352.4° F, so the dominant flavors of the strain you use should still be evident in the infused oil. Cannabinoids, specifically THC and CBD, exist in acidic and activated forms. In the plant, these cannabinoids exist almost entirely in the acidic form and are known as THCA and CBDA. When heated, these acidic forms undergo a chemical reaction called decarboxylation that results in THCA converting to THC and CBDA converting to CBD. Complete activation occurs when heated to 220° F for 90 minutes. In theory, the double boiler cooks at 212° F, but many factors can change that number, so you may need to experiment by adding or subtracting a few minutes to achieve your desired effects. Remember, if you are going to use the oil in a recipe that will expose it to further heat, you don’t want it to be fully activated at this stage. Further, coconut oil has an average smoking point of 350° F, and can be very tricky to cook on direct heat. A double boiler cooks by steam so the oil doesn’t burn easily. Overcooking the oil compromises the fats and the taste will be most unappealing. If this happens, all you can do is throw it out, wipe the pan clean, and start over. Health Benefits Cannabis and coconut oil are what some would call the perfect pair. Coupling coconut oil, “a vegan-friendly super food,” with cannabis, “nature’s miracle plant,” makes a lot of sense. Coconut oil is a saturated oil made primarily of medium-chain fatty acids. It is safe to ingest in edible form and is easily digested. It gets its extra punch from lauric acid (C12), which comprises about 50% of the total fatty acids, and has been linked to many health benefits: reducing abdominal obesity, accelerating healing time for wounds, delivering antioxidant properties, lowering lipid components (e.g. cholesterol, triglycerides), preventing bone loss and more. Some people even use coconut oil as a daily detox. Saturated fats have gotten a bad rap for decades. They have been accused of contributing to high cholesterol, heart disease, obesity, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Much confusion and contradictory evidence exists on the subject, even among health care professionals. Professionals, like Dr. Aseem Malhotra, are trying to set the record straight. Dr. Malhotra gained attention after the publication of his peer-reviewed editorial in the 2013 British Medical Journal (BMJ), wherein he seriously challenged the conventional view on saturated fats, and found no significant association between saturated fat and cardiovascular risk. Coconut Oil Uses There are so many things you can do with cannabis infused coconut oil including: Drizzle over hot cooked pastas, grains, cereals and vegetables Great for sauces and dressings Add to hot cooked soups and stews Use as a poultry rub Pan fry foods like scrambled egg, fish, bananas, chicken Put a spoonful in your coffee, tea or hot chocolate Add to smoothies Types of Coconut Oil Organic, virgin (or extra-virgin), raw, unrefined, centrifuged and cold-pressed are all terms you want to look for when selecting a coconut oil for ingesting with no cooking or for use in low-heat cooking. These oils typically deliver a strong coconut flavor. Organic, refined, expeller-pressed and solvent-free are the terms you are looking for when selecting an oil for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, especially when using higher temperatures. These refined oils also tend to have a lighter coconut flavor. Virgin Oil: Unrefined / Centrifuged Oil True virgin oil is a centrifuged coconut oil produced without using heat. It is considered one of the highest quality oils, but also one of the most expensive coconut oils on the market today. Terms like raw, pure and unrefined are associated with virgin oils. Virgin coconut oil has a more distinct coconut flavor. It is considered by most to be extremely mild and smooth, and can be eaten right off a spoon. Producing high-quality virgin oil is timely and expensive. Using a machine (centrifuge) cooled by chilled water, coconut cream is produced from pressing the fresh, white meat of the coconut and then concentrating it to yield more and more oil while the proteins and water soluble constituents are separated out and more of the phytonutrients are preserved. Unlike olive oil and some of the other oils, there are no standards to be met in the coconut oil industry to claim extra-virgin status. It is mostly a buzz word used for marketing. Cold-pressed Oils Cold-pressed coconut oils are also often referred to as raw or unrefined. The extraction method used to produce these oils is very similar to the centrifuged method used to make virgin coconut oils. The cold-pressing method however uses a drying process, which can be accomplished using varying degrees of heat. Therefore, very few cold-pressed oils are truly virgin oils. The method of drying and amount of heat used will determine the quality and taste of the coconut oil. Oils processed at high temperatures may taste of toasted coconut, while those processed at lower temperatures tend to deliver more of a mild, raw coconut flavor. If the oil was poorly processed, it may exhibit burnt or rancid qualities. Refined or RBD Coconut Oils Most coconut oils available on the market today are refined or RBD (refined, bleached and deodorized). If a label doesn’t say it is otherwise, then it is most likely refined. These are typically the least expensive of all coconut oils. Refined coconut oil should deliver a light, delicate flavor. The refining process strips away some of the nutrients, but it doesn’t have to alter other attributes of the coconut oil (such as fatty acid profile, taste, aroma). The methods for producing refined oils varies significantly, and can be accomplished with or without harsh solvents (like lye or hexane). If a product doesn’t say it is solvent free, it is a safe bet it was chemically processed and you should avoid it. Otherwise, RBD oils are fine to use, especially for cooking. Bleaching simply refers to the filtering process to remove impurities and is generally not a chemical process. Organic usually signifies that no harsh chemicals or solvents were used in the production. Expeller-pressed Extraction Method The expeller-pressed extraction method is used to produce RBD oils. During production the coconut meat is dried (most often by sun or smoke) and then pressed in large expeller presses. The resulting coconut oil is crude and must be refined or cleaned to minimize free fatty acids, remove remaining moisture, and minimize bad flavors or aromas. Expeller-pressed coconut oils can be a good option if you do not want to pay the premium for virgin oils. They are also a good option for those who do not like the taste of coconuts, or don’t want a strong coconut flavor for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, certain foods. Just be certain that no chemicals or solvents were used in the process. MCT Oil Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are a form of saturated fatty acid that has numerous health benefits. Coconut oil is one great source of MCTs. Roughly 65% of the fatty acids in coconut oil are medium-chain triglycerides. There are four kinds of MCTs: caproic (C6), caprylic (C8), capric (C10) and lauric (C12) acids. Generally speaking, the shorter the chain (meaning the lower the number of carbons the acid has), the faster the body can turn the fatty acids into ketones (usable energy). MCT oil is not an oil found in nature, but is instead manufactured by machine. The fatty acids are extracted through an industrial process of fractionation and concentrated into MCT oil. The logic is that since MCTs are healthy, the more the better. However, lauric acid (C12) is totally void, or present only in minuscule amounts in MCT oil. This has caused much debate on the matter. One side argues that MCT oils don’t include lauric acid because it is rare and more costly to include, and the other side argues that C12 is a less efficient way to obtain energy and adds nothing extra to the product. MCT oil makers advocate using only C8 and C10 (or 100% of one or the other) because they are the most rapidly metabolized for energy. Choosing between coconut oil and MCT oil, or deciding which one is better, should not be a concern when you understand the differences. On one hand, coconut oil is high in lauric acid which has well-documented health benefits, and MCT oil has very little to offer in that way. On the other hand, MCT oil may help raise energy levels better than coconut oil, but little proof is available to validate this claim. If you do plan to use an MCT oil, be sure the label clearly lists the ingredients and discloses how it was produced. Many MCT oils are chemically altered and contain unhealthy fillers like polyunsaturated fats, and due to their refining process may use harsh solvents and chemicals in manufacturing. Storage and Shelf-Life Be sure to keep the infused oil in a container with a tight lid (insects and critters love it). A glass jar with a wide mouth works well so that you can scoop it out easily. The infused oil should be kept out of direct sunlight. It can be refrigerated, but it is not necessary. It can also be frozen, but freezing it will change the taste - sometimes for the better but sometimes for the worse. Coconut oil is very stable and depending on the kind, can last anywhere from 18 months to several years. Opinions differ on how long cannabis-infused oil can be kept. Most agree that degradation begins after 2-3 months, and sooner after repeated exposure to air (opening and shutting the jar) or overexposure to sunlight or heat. This does not mean it is unusable, but you will definitely start to notice a change in the taste and effectiveness as the cannabinoids begin to degrade.
When people think of brownies, they don’t usually think of them being too healthy. However, that thought is about to change thanks to the addition of hemp seeds in to the traditional brownie recipe. With the recent explosion of hemp knowledge and support, more and more people are beginning to incorporate hemp in to their diets, more specifically the seeds. The seeds of the hemp plant are the most helpful part, containing an excellent source of vegan protein, dietary fiber and all essential amino acids, plus the added benefit of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.

 Now let it cook on the grill for about 8-10 minutes or until the insides are no longer pink (when checking for pinkness, pick the largest part of the chicken). If you like your grilled chicken smothered in perfectly sinful sauce, use 2 cups of honey BBQ sauce with 2 teaspoons of canna-oil and stir together, it adds a great finishing touch. This is what you would call a gourmet way to get blown, bon appetit!
These treats make a great party favor or possibly just something for a hot summer night. Making delicious edibles is also a great way to impress your friends. A good marijuana cook can make the best dishes “special”. Your friends are sure to always come to you if they want some dank goodies. Who knows, if you’re good enough at baking them, maybe you can start your own edibles business! Not only are edibles a strong high, they’re a great way to medicate for patients that can’t smoke.
Alright I worded that poorly really I just take offense to people not liking the taste of cannabis , the way I see it if you don’t like the taste of Mary Jane get the fudge out! ” it’s funny because I often make fudge…:) so you’re saying I should decarb a finished product like it’s already been dried and cured and all that good stuff it would benefit me to de-carb that? And thanks for fast reply!
Nick and Mary eventually decided to follow his parents to Portland, where Mary began helping her mother-in-law with the company. She created a Facebook page and designed the logo, coming up with a whisk-and-marijuana-leaf motif. Before long, Mary told me, “I realized we could have a real business.” She and Wolf are an unlikely pair. In contrast to Wolf’s bohemian vibe, Mary exudes wholesomeness. She has short blond hair and rosy cheeks. “I call us Beauty and Obese,” Wolf said. In cooking videos on the Cannabist, they have an “Absolutely Fabulous” dynamic. When Mary says, “We’re going to mix it all into the pot, and it’s going to be delicious,” her mother-in-law exclaims, “Ha-ha. You said ‘pot!’ ” But their skills appear to be well matched. Wolf is the right-brain person, dreaming up recipe ideas, while Mary oversees the left-brain tasks, navigating Oregon’s complicated regulatory requirements.
Studies show cannabidiol (CBD) has tremendous medical potential, especially in the treatment of seizure disorders and pediatric patients. Indications also suggest CBD lowers blood sugar, which makes it desirable for treating diabetes. Its sedative properties make it useful in the treatment of stress-related and sleep disorders. CBDA and CBD are non-psychoactive. Unlike THCA and THC, converting CBDA to CBD will not make a psychoactive product. CBD has a calming effect. This makes it ideal for treating children, the aged or patients that prefer less psychoactive effects. THC vaporizes quicker than CBD, so decarboxylating higher CBD varieties may produce higher CBD-enriched material. However, if you are not using a high CBD strain, extending the heating process may accomplish no more than burning off the THC.
Healthy eating is important in the life of a stoner! Stir fry has always been a favorite of mine and now you can make it medicated! It’s a far cry from the food we made in Home Ec in middle school but it tastes even better, now that we’re old enough not to burn the veggies to the pan. You can add in veggies or meats if you feel like it and of course, more bud if you feel inclined. Just always remember that eating cannabis is much different than smoking cannabis and you should always know your tolerance before eating too much!
Oh, but I do. I’ve been making it for about 40 years. It just has to be hot enough to cause carboxylation (178+F), and it’s crucial not to burn the butter. You can do it with water and butter, but still, that only takes about 75 minutes tops. I’m doing it in straight butter because like cooks who make Hollandaise sauce on the heat, it’s because I’m good at it. What a vape has to do with any of this is beyond me. Keep vaping, and you’ll have COPD, chronic bronchitis, and any number of lung issues, because contrary to your hipster beliefs system that is completely wrong, vaping is bad for you. When you’ve done this as long as I have, then get back to me.

 In a large saucepan combine the sugar, corn syrup, salt, and water and cook on medium heat bringing it to a boil. Make sure you rememeber to stir frequently so nothing burns. After all the sugar is dissolved it’s time to mix in your peanuts. Be sure to check your handy dandy thermometer and cook until the temperature reaches 300 degrees. Remove from heat and immediately mix in canna-butter the star of the show, and baking soda. Then put the entire mixture onto the cookie sheet.
BUT…that said, you must be EXTREMELY cautious when it comes to THC and pets, especially dogs as dogs have more cannabinoid receptors in their brains than any other species! Likewise, it is very easy for them to get too much. In most cases they will sleep it off and be fine but it is scary for the owner to watch and uncomfortable for the pet if they get too much. Overdose is characterized by a condition known as Static Ataxia, which is characterized by a wide-legged stance, drooling, disorientation, and the animal being hypersensitive to touch (if you pet dog who has had too much, it will react almost like an electrical shock). They are likely to have quick shallow breathing too. It can take hours to wear off and it is scary to watch.
First, use a coffee grinder to turn your herb in to a fine powder. As always, the drier the herb, the better. When the herb is ground up, add it in to the crockpot and add the glycerin. It’s best to use a crockpot that has a “Warm” setting. If the tincture is boiling, more THC will dissipate, creating a lesser effect with the end product. Leave the tincture on warm for 24 hours. Stir it occasionally. You can also test it but BE CAREFUL! Glycerin holds heat in and gets extremely hot! Don’t burn yourself.
So to take the taste out, you basically have to extract as much of that stuff as possible by soaking the bud for a couple of days in distilled water, and then after that, blanching it. By blanching, you're basically getting a much purer flower to start with and later to infuse into your butter or oil. It's still going to smell like cannabis, but if you cook with it, you won't taste anything. Most canna-butters are usually green or even black. Mine is yellow.
Seven years ago, when Colorado and Washington became the first states to legalize recreational use, Danny Schaefer saw a business opportunity. Schaefer wasn’t interested in growing or distributing cannabis, but he knew visitors would flock to Colorado to openly participate in a drug culture long forced underground. So he founded My 420 Tours, which bills itself as “the original Colorado cannabis tour.” They offer all-inclusive vacations that include pot-friendly hotels, growhouse tours, cannabis massages and sushi and joint rolling classes.
When making your own edibles using dried flower, you first have to grind the cannabis flowers and bake them. If you’re making your own canna oil or butter, the recipe always starts with cooking the dried flower in the oven before it can be steeped in the oil. This heating process—whether it happens through a portable vaporizer or your kitchen’s oven—is called decarboxylation. In addition, accessory products like the LEVO and the Magical Butter Maker can help simplify the process.
please help me with this confusion. Ideally, decarboxylation takes place at a temperature just over 200 for about just under an hour. This is accomplished in boiling water, which reaches and maintains about 212 degrees. So if I boil the herb at that temp for an hour, isn’t that decarboxylating it? Why do it in the oven first and then do it again in the saucepan? What am I missing?

Cooking is a huge part of the holidays for most people. The main course is definitely important but what would that be without those delicious added bonus foods? Side dishes are always very important for the holiday meals. Everyone knows that mashed potatoes are probably the best part of any holiday. Take, for example, these mashed grapefruit sweet potatoes that also happen to be medicated. They taste good and get you high. With a very simple recipe (on a scale of 1 to 10, we give it about a 3), these sweet potatoes will be a hit at at any table this holiday season.
Adding cannabutter or cannaoil to your tea may sound strange, but it actually results in a creamy, latte-like drink. As far as oil goes, coconut oil is the best choice due to the flavor and the fact that unlike other oils, it gets creamy when mixed up. Just brew a cup of your favorite tea and stir in the cannabutter or cannabis coconut oil until it’s mixed well. The result is a warm, comforting, medicinal cuppa, sure to make you feel good.
In most instances, oil will rise to the top of the water but won’t solidify.  No problem.  You can use a spoon to skim the oil off the water.  Even better is a kitchen gadget called a gravy separator that looks like a small pitcher with the spout originating on the bottom.  This unique design allows the water to be poured out while retaining every drop of the oil floating at the top.  During the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, gravy separators are sold everywhere, otherwise find them at gourmet shops.  You can also find extra large gravy separators year round at restaurant supply stores.
“Oh, we will,” Montrose said, explaining that consumption quality would be judged at a later stage, but that it was essential to examine the plants first. “Some of the cannabis we looked at today, it looked, like, out of this world, outrageous, will blow you away. And you put it under the microscope and it’s full of webs and bugs and spiders, fecal matter, exoskeletons!”
The following day, the candy should have hardened in to a taffy like substance, not too hard but not too soft. If the mixture hasn’t gained the correct consistency, continue to let it sit out until it does. Once the mix has the taffy consistency that we all love, you can cut it in to pieces and wrap them individually in wax or cellophane. Give them out as treats or hoard them all for yourself! Either way, enjoy your awesome taffy candy!
The recipes in this book are quite different than what I was expecting, but are delicious nonetheless. The instructions for making cannabutter/ghee and cannaflour are very useful, though in practice not always as easy as stated. All the recipes are very easily adapted to exclude the cannabis, and are very good on their own. Many recipes call for adding fresh pot to the dish (e.g. tossing ground buds into a salad, or stirring some into guacamole), and the taste can be quite strong. This cookbook isn't for someone just looking for brownie and cookie recipes. Many dishes included are somewhat labour intensive, but are certainly beneficial for medicinal marijuana patients looking to maintain a steady level of THC in their bodies, as the book contains recipes for any time of day. I would suggest trying a recipe out first without the pot, to work out any kinks. The recipes are meant to replace smoking marijuana (as that was the author's goal), so the proportions might seem a bit staggering at first. It's hard to watch 1/4 oz. get turned into hot chocolate, but that's why I suggest trying the recipes out pot-free first. It's easier than wasting good bud on a dish you don't like. All in all, it's a good cookbook, with well-thought-out recipes, and many interesting facts about cannabis and the people who've made history in the world of pot.
It was the Instagram account—where he posts things like artfully plated cannabis-infused foie gras custard with blackberry gelée, fish with radish marinated in a cannabis-vinegar blend, and peppercorn-crusted strip steak in a medicated Cabernet Sauvignon reduction—that led to his first private dinner. Things snowballed from there. Now, in addition to his restaurant ambitions and dinners, he’s gearing up for a TV show he describes as “Anthony Bourdain meets Bear Grylls”. The restaurant alone has presented a list of challenges not faced by traditional restaurateurs, from training cooks and waiters to work with cannabis to finding a landlord willing to rent to him.
Hi, Congratulations on making your first batch! The short answer is yes, you need a double boiler. I will tell you that coconut oil on the double boiler is not the simplest method. It does require you to watch the infusion that it does not get too hot or too thick, as moisture will escape during the process, thickening your infusion. Also be certain to not let the water boil off in the bottom vessel. A candy thermometer will definitely come in handy to ensure your infusion temps stay below 180 degrees (I like 140 or so). Personally, I recommend using a crock pot or slow cooker. You don’t have to watch it all the time like you do with a double boiler and you can be sure your temps will not get too high. I go over both these methods in detail in my Cannabis Cooking For Home Cooks course. You should check it out.
What better stoner treat to make in the summer for when the heat really hits? Popsicles are always a hit, it doesn’t matter what age you and your friends are or what time of year it is for that matter. If you whip these babies out at a backyard gathering in the summer, you’re sure to be a huge hit. Plus, since they’re medicated, people will be able to enjoy your party that much more. And if you don’t feel like sharing, you don’t have to and you can eat this tray of six popsicles all to yourself.
"A beautiful, bold contribution to humanity that enables newbies and the experienced to learn the versatile ways this ancient plant can be used for food and medicine. Wonderful photographs, delectable recipes and in-depth explanations on how to use cannabis safely and effectively to get the desired results, whether it be for food, fun, or medicine." - ​world-renowned herbalist Brigitte Mars

Cannabis infused butter, otherwise known as cannabutter, is a primary ingredient in many marijuana-infused recipes. Cannabis butter is technically an ‘extraction’ method whereby the cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are extracted from the cannabis plant and infused into the butter fats. The butter from a normal recipe is then substituted with cannabutter to produce psychoactive effects. Cannabis butter is often used in decadent edible recipes (such as brownies), but ultimately its use depends on the cook and his/her personal preferences and/or their dietary needs. It can be made from dried or decarboxylated cannabis buds, trim, solvent-less hash or even sugar leaf.

Before learning about ways to make marijuana your go-to herb in the kitchen, find out whether it’s legal in the state you’re in. Currently, medical marijuana is legal in 30 states and Washington, D.C., while eight states and the District of Columbia have legalized it for recreational use. Thirteen states, however, have decriminalization laws in effect, so make sure to know what the legalities are where you live first.
Cons: Without cannabinoids in the body, tolerance is very low so any exposure to THC smoke will result in a psychoactive rush many users try to avoid, so even though there are just a few parts of THC per CBD, smoking the oil is not recommended for those with very low tolerance. Also, smoking may agitate the throat and lungs, so heavy coughing may result.
Not only are hemp hearts an extremely nutritious part of a diet but they are also gluten free and are considered a raw food, plus they never contain allergens. The hearts aren’t nuts either, leaving them to be enjoyed by basically everyone. They can be eaten raw like peanuts or added to snacks like cereal, yogurt, or fruit salad. Taste-wise, they resemble sunflower seeds so if you enjoy those, you’ll definitely love the taste of hemp hearts. And if you don’t, simply juice them and drink them as a shot. It may taste bad but the health benefits are worth you taking a shot of something that doesn’t taste very good!
I am the only person I know of who does not recommend you finely grind your weed. I do not understand whay so many people are obsessed with finely grinding the plant material. What you are trying to extract is ON the plant, not in it. The more grinding, the more plant particulate in your food and the yuckier the flavor, IMO. I use a coarse hand grinder or my fingers to break up the plant material, no more.
That’s right. Cinnamon cannabis oatmeal cookies. Oatmeal isn’t the most popular flavor of cookies but cinnamon roll is something that most people agree is amazing. On a scale of 1 to 10, this recipe comes in at about a 3 for difficulty, meaning that pretty much anyone is capable of accomplishing the task of making these. They’ll also get you pretty stoned, an added bonus. These will do well at a party or a gift for a friend and they’re the perfect recipe to begin your cannabis culinary adventure. Whatever you choose to do with them, you’ll love the way they taste!

Tim Pilcher is a pop culture expert and has worked in and around the comics industry for over 20 years as a writer and editor DC Comics' Vertigo imprint, Comics International, and is a co-founder of a bilingual comic publishing house. He has written comics for the BBC, DeAgostini, Weldon, and The Young Telegraph. Pilcher has written over 16 books on comics, contributed to numerous other comics, and keeps a blog titled www.sexdrugsandcomicbooks.blogspot.com.
Amateur edible makers will often talk about how strong their brownies are, but I don't think they really understand what that means. When I first got into this industry, I went to a dispensary with some friends who wanted to get some edibles. I was hesitant because I'd already had a bad experience with a highly potent edible that didn't taste good and I thought it was a waste of money for me. Meanwhile, my friend was like, "Oh, a 150 milligram brownie, I'll get that!" It was like $30, and I don't even think he knew what he had just bought.

The method of draining is identical for stovetop and slow cooker methods.  Place a cheesecloth lined strainer over a large pot or bowl and strain the liquid through this.  Before discarding plant material, pour a large kettle full of boiling water over the full strainer in order to wash through any extra oil clinging to the plant material.  Allow to cool then squeeze out as much liquid as possible.  Discard the plant material.  If you are using a solid at room temperature fat like coconut oil or shortening, chill water and oil.  The infused oil will harden into a solid when chilled making it easy for you to simply lift the piece off of the water below and discard the water.

This is my new Bible... This is the most comprehensive cookbook I've ever owned. I have all of Cheri's books, and they never disappoint. The Eggs Benedict was my first choice to prepare.... heavenly is all I can say. The directions are simple and easy to understand. The cannabis butter and cannabis oil recipes are on point. I have made my own for years, but those methods are now subject to change. The Hemp Hummus and Ganja Guacamole are excellent as well. I make medicated goodies for a local women's group once a month, and I'm going to use this cookbook to wow them... I can't encourage you enough to buy this book. Well written, easy to read, simple instructions, and you don't need to buy special tools or appliances. I love this new book, and can't wait for the next! This will be your favorite cookbook if you believe in the effectiveness of cannabis in your life.
Likewise, if you ever find yourself with a weak batch of food, eat more! If you make a batch of infused butter or oil that is less potent than you’d like, you can always augment it later by heating gently to dissolve some decarboxylated kief or hash into it before using in recipes.  I know marijuana is an expensive ingredient and the natural urge is to use as little as possible.  But think of it this way, you can always eat smaller portions, but if your batch of edibles does not deliver, there’s no way to avoid disappointment.  I won’t say that you “wasted” the weed as you will still be getting medicinal benefits even if you don’t feel high, but if you were expecting/desiring a buzz and you use too little, then you certainly did not put your plant material to its optimal use. Learn more about dosing at this link.
The number of people who think that sweets are the only kind of edibles you can make with marijuana consistently surprises me. The fact is most any food can be infused with cannabis. In fact, it is usually easier to hide the green herbal flavor that most people don’t like in spicy and/or savory foods. There are lots of terrific cannabis cookbooks on the market to help you expand you cannabis culinary repertoire, including my own Cannabis Gourmet Cookbook and The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. You can also find lots of recipes, both savory and sweet, on this blog.
I can speculate that maybe what you are seeing is small plant matter particulates that are settling, because in theory the heat should have emulsified the oils together. If this is the case you could use a fine strainer, or just give it a stir and cook with it all. If I were to infuse oil, I would infuse with buds or trim using the method at this page
Grind your marijuana. You want to start with dry marijuana. You may choose to stick with only the flowers. Some people will use all parts of the plant.[4] Keep in mind that you will want to strain your oil later. Try not to grind your pot so finely that it will go through your strainer. A coffee grinder or food processor will work well. Just don't turn your marijuana into powder.
Strain the butter and refrigerate. Choose a storage container for your butter. Cover the top with cheesecloth[8] for straining. Use a rubber band around the top of the container to hold the cheesecloth in place. Pour the mixture through the cheesecloth into the container. Squeeze the solids to get as much butter out as possible. Store in an airtight container in your fridge for later use.
If you’ve ever used a tincture and tried to mix it in a drink, you’ve probably noticed it doesn’t mix all that well. Why? Pot isn’t water soluble; it’s oil soluble. So you’ll do best using a high-fat oil, like coconut oil or canola. You can even use olive oil. Keep in mind, however, that canola has a higher boiling/smoking point than coconut and olive oils.
×