So your oven should be preheating. Sift together the baking soda, salt, flour, and baking powder. Set these items aside. In a different bowl, use an electric mixer to beat the butter for about 45 seconds. Add in your lavender flowers and sugar in a consistent stream. Be sure to pause and scrape the side of the bowl to make sure that everything is getting mixed in. Beat everything together on medium power until the substance is fluffy and light. Then, keeping the mixer on medium speed, add in the eggs, beating steadily until everything is combined.

Take the orange juice concentrate, kief/hash, milk, vanilla, and sugar in to a blender. Puree the mixture until it is smooth, with a bit of froth at the top. Gradually add in the ice cubes, continuing to puree in the blender. The drink should be a smoothie like consistence, thick but not like ice cream thick. Pour in to a container and serve. Remember, the amount of kief/hash given is only an estimate. You can use more or less depending on your tolerance and personal preference. Please also remember that ingesting marijuana this way effects people differently than others and if new to edible cannabis, try smaller amounts and gradually increase as you know how it effects you.


While some of us take pizza for granted, there are some patients that have sensitive stomachs and cannot ingest this delicious meal. Thankfully, there is a gluten free option out there. Seeing as how patients suffering from Celiac disease and cancer shouldn’t ingest gluten or sugar, it is shocking to see how many sweet edibles are found in dispensaries. This recipe is aimed for people who like to eat healthier pizza and patients. It’s easy to make, even from scratch, but be sure to have a bottle of cannabis infused olive oil handy to medicate the pizza to your liking!

Medical marijuana is used to treat a variety of issues including chronic pain, childhood epilepsy, and muscle control problems.[1] While consumption of cannabinoids is often accomplished by smoking, eating medical marijuana is typically the preferred method.[2] However, cooking marijuana is not as simple as throwing pot leaves into your brownie mix. You must first create marijuana infused ingredients. Cooking with medical marijuana is then as simple as substituting a marijuana infused ingredient for a regular one.
Hey i just tried the oil in the crockpot method, turned out to what seems like good oil ( have done stove top in past) i tried two teaspoons in a small amount of water for a potency test but havent had any real results ( used about 2 1/2 cups of trimmings and small buds to 1 cup oil) im just curious is that possible to the way ive ingested it? Would baking into something and trying that be a better “strength” test? Thanks!
Because oils are slow-acting and long-lasting, it’s recommended that you start low, and go slow when experimenting with oils. They’re a much more concentrated version of flowers and buds and can have some unpleasant side effects like nausea, dizziness, thirst, and a drop in blood sugar levels if you go too quickly. Taking the oil with food in your stomach has been known to minimize nausea.
Weed connoisseur Pilcher (Spliffs 3: The Last Word on Cannabis Culture) deals a gnarly collection of 35 starters, entrees, desserts and drinks, all using the kind of pot not generally found in the kitchen cabinet. Nor is this the type of cookbook that provides a list of suppliers for hard-to-find ingredients. But for the reader with a ready stash, these offerings are served up in a well-researched and easy to digest manner, with plenty of tempting color photos and helpful data such as the suggested amount of cannabis bud per person per meal, based on body weight. The key to being a successful ganja gourmet, it turns out, is to first prepare a smooth batch of either Cannabis Ghee or Cannabis Butter. This allows for easier measurement but more importantly ensures that the psychoactive chemical du jour, tetrahydrocannabinol, blends evenly into the dish. Thus three tablespoons of Cannabutter transform perfectly legal mushrooms into Really Wild Mushroom Sauté and the hopped-up ghee is at the heart of an in-your-face Charas Curry, where it mingles with red chilies, ginger and cilantro. There's a classic brownie recipe, of course, sweetened with honey. (Oct.)

Chefs Melissa Parks and Laurie Wolf (who was dubbed the “Martha Stewart of Marijuana Edibles” by the New York Times) combined their culinary talents to create Herb, a gourmet, cannabis-infused cookbook for all skill levels. With stunning images shot by photographer Bruce Wolf, this collection features hundreds of recipes from appetizers and entrees to drinks and desserts along with a handy guide to understanding dosage and how to make sure the potency of your infused butter or oil stays consistent.

I have an ardent lift (for decarboxalation) I feel as if it over does it? It runs for about 2 hours, and claims that it’s a perfect decarb everytime. 2 hours seems a bit long. Also when I have used trim, I notice the thc % is a little bit too low. Or has at times tested at 0% (using the tcheck device) I am aware that flower bears much stronger results. .should I stick to flower for streng?

Perfecting the ultimate balance between sweet and spicy, ginger cookies have long been a wintertime favourite. If you’re using cannabis infused butter, make the recipe as is. However, if you’re adding your cannabis oil directly, you may want to slightly reduce the amount of (non-infused) butter you are using to maintain the correct amount of moisture. This recipe makes two dozen medium-sized cookies, so you’ll need to add that many doses of oil during the butter and molasses stage. All of the spice amounts here can be reduced or increased based on your preference. If you don’t have all of these spices on hand, using a pre-blended pumpkin pie spice will work almost as well (maybe with a little extra ground ginger added for good measure).
It should be known that the combination of cannabis and red wine is extremely beneficial for the human brain. A glass of red wine paired with smoking a joint repairs brain connections and protects them from further damage. Some stoners, unfortunately, find that smoking and drinking cause adverse effects that are unpleasant to say the least. It’s thought that the smoking is what causes the nausea so being able to ingest the two at the same time without that sick feeling would be perfect! Thankfully, there’s this recipe for cannabis infused red wine that you can enjoy, hopefully with out the negative feelings that sometimes accompany the two.
I am not confusing anything and you can choose to “take offense” all you like, but the FACT is MOST people do not like the taste of weed in their food. I get emails from people every day and talk to the public about this day in and day out at my classes, and most people cite flavor as one of the big reasons they do not like edibles. If you like the taste, have a party, nobody is stopping you, it is very easy to make medibles that taste like weed. But this is NOT the effect most people are going for. You can get plenty of medicinal effects without tasting a prominent flavor of cannabis, and your personal preferences aside, this is what the majority of cannabis cooks are looking for.
Yippy!!! I am new to it but CO2 Hash/Kief is the best thing ever. It took a few hours to process all the shake but I had a lot. I actually used finer micro first 70 micron (high quality), then 90 micron (2nd grade), I stopped there but maybe should have done 120 for cooking purposes. The trim was a bit on the drier side and was blended in a blender first. If you can imagine I had family growing organic medicine then throwing away the trim for five years before I stopped them!

Adding water is optional not mandatory. I would not reheat with water at this point. Stain the plant material off, if you haven’t already. If there is a lot of sediment in the bottom you can optionally reheat gently over low heat and further strain through a mesh yogurt strainer to further clarify it, but again it is optional. Will it taste too weedy? That is a personal preference but it should likely be OK, especially if you use it in highly seasoned foods that have lots of other flavors going on (a coconut curry perhaps?). Good luck.


Take the orange juice concentrate, kief/hash, milk, vanilla, and sugar in to a blender. Puree the mixture until it is smooth, with a bit of froth at the top. Gradually add in the ice cubes, continuing to puree in the blender. The drink should be a smoothie like consistence, thick but not like ice cream thick. Pour in to a container and serve. Remember, the amount of kief/hash given is only an estimate. You can use more or less depending on your tolerance and personal preference. Please also remember that ingesting marijuana this way effects people differently than others and if new to edible cannabis, try smaller amounts and gradually increase as you know how it effects you.
In a legal state, home cooks have access not only to lab-tested fresh product but sometimes also to lab-tested butters and oils. Some who prefer to infuse at home rely on online potency calculators, of which there are several. Sites like Wikileaf catalog the potency of different strains, and home potency-testing tools are starting to hit the market.
This 6-year-old cookbook is from High Times magazine, the pot-championing publication founded in 1974. The book collects recipes from various sources (cooks who’ve contributed to the magazine, a “dude from Texas”) and begins with a workmanlike introduction that covers some of the basics of working with and consuming cannabis. But those basics are minimal; strains of cannabis, relative potency and issues of temperature and decarboxylation aren’t covered. Dosing in the recipes is also vague: a recipe, for example, says it “stones 4,” and there’s no mention of how many mgs are in the servings. The recipes are fun, and hardly technically difficult: the chocolate layer cake calls for Betty Crocker cake mix and frosting. If the Munchies book is for hipster stoners, this one is for people who’ve been listening to their Cheech and Chong records on vinyl since the last time it was cool.

Okay so this is the first time that I made tincture so this recipe isn’t perfect. I’m working on making it better but keep in mind that you can change the above recipe to see how you see fit. You can definitely add more marijuana and glycerin. Adjust the recipe to your liking. I got 11 fl oz of tincture from this recipe. Next time, I plan on using 32 fl oz glycerin with 28 grams of actual bud. This way, the tincture should be a little bit stronger.


Take Viceland’s Bong Appétit, by far the biggest hit of the genre. Last year, it was nominated for a James Beard award, a top honor in the cooking world. The first two seasons featured dreamy sequences about sourcing local ingredients, bite-sized lessons in how to infuse various fats and oils with marijuana and, at the end of each episode, a giggle-ridden dinner party populated by the kind of chill stoners who would never judge you for being too high. (I found this out when I appeared on an episode that aired last summer.)


Preheat your oven to 350 F and line a non insulated cookie sheet with parchment paper. Take a knife or kitchen shears and CAREFULLY remove the kale leaves from the thicker stems. Cut up the leaves in to small, chip sized pieces. The actual size of the chip is up to you. I made mine about 1 inch by 1 inch. Be sure to wash the leaves thoroughly and dry them. Some people have access to a salad spinner but for those that don’t, I used paper towels and blotted them dry. Lay the kale out on the cookie sheet and slowly pour the cannabis olive oil over the the kale chips and then sprinkles with the sea salt and pepper, as well as any other spices that you’d like to add in. Place the chips in the oven and bake them until the edges begin to turn brown, absolutely no longer than 10 minutes. Let the chips cool off for a bit and your healthy, medicated snack is ready!

You must be 21 years of age to attend our experiences. Please make sure to bring your non-expired ID, or State issued License. Temporary IDs cannot be used to validate entry into dispensaries and/or grow facilities. Non-US Citizens must present a valid passport to enter cannabis businesses. These are the rules of the Marijuana Enforcement Division.
Robyn Griggs Lawrence cares about your well-being. As a former editor of Natural Home magazine, she wrote a number of books on healthy living before making her foray into the culinary cannabis world. Her “Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook,” which has a foreword written by Women Grow co-founder Jane West, gathers wholesome recipes and tips from chefs across the country on making edibles that are vegan, vegetarian, raw and gluten-free. The book includes cameos from Scott Durrah, a co-found of Denver cannabis cooking company Simply Pure, and Catjia Redfern, co-founder of MegaMints, among others.

Likewise, if you ever find yourself with a weak batch of food, eat more! If you make a batch of infused butter or oil that is less potent than you’d like, you can always augment it later by heating gently to dissolve some decarboxylated kief or hash into it before using in recipes.  I know marijuana is an expensive ingredient and the natural urge is to use as little as possible.  But think of it this way, you can always eat smaller portions, but if your batch of edibles does not deliver, there’s no way to avoid disappointment.  I won’t say that you “wasted” the weed as you will still be getting medicinal benefits even if you don’t feel high, but if you were expecting/desiring a buzz and you use too little, then you certainly did not put your plant material to its optimal use. Learn more about dosing at this link.

The recipes in this book are quite different than what I was expecting, but are delicious nonetheless. The instructions for making cannabutter/ghee and cannaflour are very useful, though in practice not always as easy as stated. All the recipes are very easily adapted to exclude the cannabis, and are very good on their own. Many recipes call for adding fresh pot to the dish (e.g. tossing ground buds into a salad, or stirring some into guacamole), and the taste can be quite strong. This cookbook isn't for someone just looking for brownie and cookie recipes. Many dishes included are somewhat labour intensive, but are certainly beneficial for medicinal marijuana patients looking to maintain a steady level of THC in their bodies, as the book contains recipes for any time of day. I would suggest trying a recipe out first without the pot, to work out any kinks. The recipes are meant to replace smoking marijuana (as that was the author's goal), so the proportions might seem a bit staggering at first. It's hard to watch 1/4 oz. get turned into hot chocolate, but that's why I suggest trying the recipes out pot-free first. It's easier than wasting good bud on a dish you don't like. All in all, it's a good cookbook, with well-thought-out recipes, and many interesting facts about cannabis and the people who've made history in the world of pot.
A standard dose of a CBD-rich oil begins at 10 mg – or 1ml (depending on the equivalency). However, it’s also possible to microdose at 2.5 to 5 milligrams daily. For more severe conditions, a much higher dose may be needed – and some patients are known to go up to 1 gram per day. However, a daily gram of cannabis oil is a very large amount and the attention of a cannabis-savvy doctor is always best. 
Mary Poppins wasn’t just blowing smoke when she sang, “Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.” There’s proof lining the shelves of dispensaries across the country, and the choices in infused edibles have never been better. But for some patients, it’s more complicated than choosing between Dr. Robert’s Chocolate Trip Cookie and Compassion Edibles’ Traditional French Chocolate Tainted Truffles. People with special dietary …
Cannabis-infused oil is probably the most versatile medium and a great place to start, since it can be used for baking desserts, sautéing veggies, frying up your morning eggs, or in your salad dressing. In addition, as is the case with cooking anything at home, you have complete control over its preparation. Does peanut oil hold a special place in your heart? Make cannabis-infused peanut oil!
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