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This first-ever cookbook from High Times magazine—the world's most trusted name when it comes to getting stoned—is the deliciously definitive guide to cannabis-infused cooking. Easy, accessible recipes and advice demystify the experience of cooking with grass and offer a cornucopia of irie appetizers and entrees, stoner sweets, cannabis cocktails, and high-holiday feasts for any occasion, from Time Warp Tamales and Sativa Shrimp Spring Rolls to Pico de Ganja Nachos and Pineapple Express Upside-Down Cake. Delectable color photos and recipes inspired by stoner celebrities such as Snoop Dogg, Cheech and Chong, and Willie Nelson will spark the interest of experienced cannabis cooks and "budding" chefs, whether they're looking for the perfect midnight munchie or just to take dinner to a higher level.
The first thing you must do if cooking with cannabis is to activate the THC and/or CBD. And that requires heat. The process you will use to do this is called decarboxylation. This is what will give your edibles the “buzz” you want. Beyond that, however, raw cannabis placed directly into recipes will not allow the range of cannabinoids found in the plant to activate and bind to fat. You will just be wasting cannabis, in other words. And who wants that?
Wolf’s mixed nuts have had a lot of traction. She adapted them from a Danny Meyer recipe and added infused coconut oil, a staple in her kitchen because it can also be used topically, “so you’re getting more bang for your buck.” (An elderly friend of Wolf’s rubs it on his hands to treat his rheumatoid arthritis.) Wolf’s newest book, “Cooking with Cannabis,” emphasizes comfort foods like mac and cheese and meatloaf. There’s a chapter called “Recipes for One,” intended for solo eaters. “It’s great to be able to make yourself ramen,” she said. (The cannabis goes in the broth, mixed with sesame oil.)
Ratios and amounts are a personal thing. The recipes on this site use 1/2 ounce per cup of butter, for myself i usually use double that amount. Take my free dosing class to learn more at http://www.Cannademy.com. I am not a fan of the Magical Butter Machine and do not recommend it as I do not recommend finely grinding your plant material and machine forces you to do that.

Other components of the cannabis plant are in the hash oil as well. Traces of psychoactive THC and other cannabinoids are included to ensure the “entourage effect”. The entourage effect is the term given to the process of all available cannabinoids working together within the body to allow the desired effect to manifest. Thus, you should use High CBD Hash Oil with caution, be prepared for varied results, and take notes on how effective the ratio of CBD:THC is for your symptoms.
Part of weed culture since the 1960s, weed butter can be made in a variety of ways. The process begins with some version of decarboxylation—or activating the THC. (Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is the psychoactive chemical compound of cannabis—what gets you stoned and what separates marijuana from hemp.) Decarboxylation can be done a multitude of ways, but typically involves cooking the weed at a low temperature for a prolonged period of time in butter or oil. Keep in mind, however, like any other dish you’re making, too much time in the oven or too much heat will torch the ingredients—rendering the THC ineffective.
The number of people who think that sweets are the only kind of edibles you can make with marijuana consistently surprises me. The fact is most any food can be infused with cannabis. In fact, it is usually easier to hide the green herbal flavor that most people don’t like in spicy and/or savory foods. There are lots of terrific cannabis cookbooks on the market to help you expand you cannabis culinary repertoire, including my own Cannabis Gourmet Cookbook and The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. You can also find lots of recipes, both savory and sweet, on this blog.
As to “mud” I would have had to see it to be sure what the cause is. Was there dirt or roots in the mix? Actual dirt should be gently washed off – gently you don’t want to remove trichomes. If not, it sounds like maybe the plant material was too finely ground. I know a lot cooks recommend grinding the plants finely (and the Magic Butter Machine does it automatically). But I have found it is better to just rough grind as if you were rolling a joint, or even just crumble the plant material with your fingers. What you are trying to extract is ON the plant, not within it, and I find that over grinding just adds extra plant material and green taste to the final product.
There are two main ways to achieve this objective; juicing high-THC strains or consuming an edible made from hemp derived CBD. We’ve written the guide to juicing cannabis here – all you need is some fresh plant material. If you don’t have access to raw cannabis plants, we suggest a high-CBD edible like the Full Spectrum Tinctures or Gel Caps from Ambary Gardens. These products are created using a very similar process to the one outlined above, only with hemp as opposed to high-THC cannabis. They even utilize MCT coconut oil for increased bioavailability – simply put, Ambary makes the best CBD-rich edibles on the market and they can ship to all 50 states.
Pros: Edibles have demonstrated the longest-duration medicinal effect of any method of medication. Also, the total amounts of cannabinoids available through eating are multiplied and could have a much stronger effect than smoking. Coconut oil can be mixed with any foods to keep medication very discrete. Butter can also be used but use unsalted as it will separate. There are hundreds of recipes to meet dietary needs and taste pallets.
As to how much bud to use, that depends on how strong you want the oil. The recipes on this site use 1/2 ounce (14 grams) per one cup of oil or butter. That said, when cooking for myself, I use double that amount. I have a high tolerance, but even for those who are “lightweights” making stronger infusions allows you to use less of them in order to get the same dose. Less infusion in the finished recipe means better flavor. If you haven’t already, my free online Dosing class at http://www.Cannademy.com can help you fine tune and adjust your recipes for what you need. If you are unsure of how much you need, please see this article to determine your ideal dose, because everyone is different and not just a little different.
How do you grind your weed? You can use a quality cannabis grinder which you can buy at our store. You can use a food processor or a coffee grinder, although you’d probably want to designate a processor or coffee grinder specifically for that use (unless you don’t mind leaving a little residual flavor, which could be a good thing if you like your morning cup of Joe to taste like Bubba Kush).
You can combine the amount of tablespoons of infused-coconut oil you wish to consume based on the above formula with plain coconut oil to fill out any recipe that calls for oil. Brownies are easy because they usually call for 1/3 cup oil and may be divided and stored for later consumption. The above recipe of 1/3 cup infused-oil into 12 brownies would yield about 83mg cannabinoids per brownie.
So your oven should be preheating. Sift together the baking soda, salt, flour, and baking powder. Set these items aside. In a different bowl, use an electric mixer to beat the butter for about 45 seconds. Add in your lavender flowers and sugar in a consistent stream. Be sure to pause and scrape the side of the bowl to make sure that everything is getting mixed in. Beat everything together on medium power until the substance is fluffy and light. Then, keeping the mixer on medium speed, add in the eggs, beating steadily until everything is combined.

Then, take the tahini, garlic, lemon juice, beans, and cumin to a food processor and grind everything in to a paste. Then, slowly add in your oil, blending the mixture occasionally. Once you’ve added your satisfactory amount of THC oil, you can top the hummus with salt and pepper to taste if you’d like. This delicious and healthy snack is great for pita dipping, chips, or to take the place of mayonnaise in sandwiches. You’ll get a much more intense flavor without the added fat. Enjoy your hummus!
Cons: Users report that topical solutions infused with cannabis are short lasting and not effective over a prolonged period in comparison to edibles or tinctures. Coconut oil is pure fat so application is greasy and users should be cautious to come in contact with clothing or bedding reduce stains. Some symptoms, like internal pain, may not be reduced by topical use.

Help! I am looking for a way to use BHO in cooking. I don’t know the ratios. I have made cannabutter many times and made BHO, but I’ve never cooked with it. One ounce of bud to pound of butter and the edibles are good and strong. I have one gram of BHO from the same bud and would love to cook with it. I know it will be so much stronger so I am not sure how to use in a recipe. Your help is appreciated! –Chiefing Chef


In many states in the US, a single dose of an edible is 10 mg of either THC or CBD – but some medical cannabis products can contain over 100mg of THC. As always, the stronger concentrations are better to work up to slowly, and to work in collaboration with a cannabis-savvy doctor. After testing out a single dose, most medical cannabis patients are recommended to increase in increments of 5 mg until they achieve the desired effects.
Cannabis edibles have come a long way from brownies and cookies. Just ask Cheri Sicard, nicknamed the “Martha Stewart of weed” by The Daily Beast, who serves up the most definitive guide to cooking with cannabis in The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. Featuring a comprehensive introduction to the history and benefits of cannabis, a fool-proof guide to finding your perfect dose, and 60 reliable recipes that redefine stoner eats, this cookbook makes eating homemade edibles easy.

Let's just say you took your weed and put it into a crock pot, like a lot of people do, with some butter, oil, and water and let it simmer. What you're really doing, in addition to simmering all of those cannabinoids into the butter and oil, is also adding in any impurities that are in that bud. So anything that tastes really bad could be something as horrible as insecticides, or it could just be the chlorophyl, which also has a specific taste that's pretty powerful.
Your recipe will need to contain either a fat or an oil-based ingredient that can be infused with the cannabis concentrate. Such fats include butter, ghee, lard, shortening and other vegetable or nut oils. If your recipe does not list a “fat” ingredient, you can dilute the cannabis concentrate in a small amount of your favorite spirits: vodka, rum, cognac, etc.

One more point I should make. I live in the bush, and only have a wood cookstove to do my baking in. The oven temperature is hard to control, and I realize now that that is an important consideration. So in future, I’ll do my baking in town at my niece’s place, in an electric oven where I can control the temperature better. So if you suggest that I should heat my pot first for 20 min (decarbing, I guess), then can you suggest what temp, and for how long I should bake the little critters? Thanks in advance for your help. A very informative site!


For those who go meatless and dairy-free, this quirky cookbook lets you enjoy delicious, cannabis-infused meals and munchies without skipping a beat. Filled with cheeky illustrations and 100 simple recipes spanning all dishes, it’s designed for beginners who may be finding their way around the kitchen while looking for vegan-friendly substitutes. Note: A lot of recipes in this cookbook include soy.
“I tell people that they need to soak the cannabis in distilled water for at least 24 to 48 hours just to take out the impurities and to remove the chlorophyll,” Jeff says. “And I teach people how to blanch it to take out even more of the taste and more of the impurities, so you’re working with a really fine product that you’re going to infuse into your butter or oil.”
Pour 12 doses of cannabis oil into a measuring cup at least 1 cup in size. Once the cannabis oil has been added, top it up with the melted coconut oil until you have a total of 3/4 cup of coconut oil and cannabis oil combined. Whisk the cannabis-coconut oil combination thoroughly to make sure that the cannabis has been evenly distributed into the coconut oil. This is a very important step to ensure that each muffin has equal doses of cannabis. Add the cannabis-coconut oil combination to the wet ingredients (large bowl) and whisk together ingredients, making sure to evenly mix the cannabis-coconut oil into the wet ingredients.
Chefs Melissa Parks and Laurie Wolf (who was dubbed the “Martha Stewart of Marijuana Edibles” by the New York Times) combined their culinary talents to create Herb, a gourmet, cannabis-infused cookbook for all skill levels. With stunning images shot by photographer Bruce Wolf, this collection features hundreds of recipes from appetizers and entrees to drinks and desserts along with a handy guide to understanding dosage and how to make sure the potency of your infused butter or oil stays consistent.
In the spirit of St Patrick’s Day, making everything that we eat/use/interact with green is kind of part of the holiday. What better way to wake up on a holiday like this then with a medicated breakfast of green eggs and ham? The following recipe will not only give you weed infused eggs and ham but they’re actually green as well, making them the perfect breakfast for a festive stoner.
When straining cannabis oil after infusing it, go slow and be careful. Cheesecloth is the best strainer to use. It only allows the oil through. However, while many people will then squeeze the remaining oil out of the leaves, be careful. If you squeeze too hard, you will get extra plant material. Instead, be gentle and let gravity do the work for you.
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