Hi, Congratulations on making your first batch! The short answer is yes, you need a double boiler. I will tell you that coconut oil on the double boiler is not the simplest method. It does require you to watch the infusion that it does not get too hot or too thick, as moisture will escape during the process, thickening your infusion. Also be certain to not let the water boil off in the bottom vessel. A candy thermometer will definitely come in handy to ensure your infusion temps stay below 180 degrees (I like 140 or so). Personally, I recommend using a crock pot or slow cooker. You don’t have to watch it all the time like you do with a double boiler and you can be sure your temps will not get too high. I go over both these methods in detail in my Cannabis Cooking For Home Cooks course. You should check it out.
The main concerns when decarbing, according to McDonough, are burning the cannabis or toasting it too long at too high a temperature. She recommends checking on it frequently and stirring it up if it gets too brown around the edges. The THC will evaporate at 392 degrees Fahrenheit/200 degrees Celsius, and at higher temps the THC starts converting to cannabinol, or CBN, a cannabinoid known for making people sleepy.
Take the cannabis, lime juice, water, green onion, and the oil and place it in the crock pot. Cook the materials on low for about two hours. Once two hours has gone by, place the apple cider vinegar, soy sauce, tomato paste, chili powder, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, honey, ground ginger, cayenne pepper, and the apricot nectar in to the crockpot with the previously cooked mixture. Mix everything together well and cook on low for another hour at least. Be sure to stir the mixture occasionally. Once the sauce is done cooking, store it in an airtight container in the fridge. The recipe will yield about two cups of sauce and is definitely perfect for your backyard barbecues! Enjoy!
Many people know to decarboxylate cannabis in the oven first, but it’s worth noting here for anyone who doesn’t know or doesn’t see the point in doing so. You can skip this step and add your raw cannabis to the slow cooker to decarb in the oil, but you might find that this longer oil soak simply worsens the taste of your cannabis oil. It’s also more difficult to control the temperature in a slow cooker and you risk burning off essential cannabinoids, but in an oven, you can set the temperature low and keep it steady.
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