Much like how the West Coast found itself on the cutting edge of coffee, craft beer, wine and plant-based cooking, Portland food writer Martha Holmberg said she won’t be surprised if the region revolutionizes the way cannabis is incorporated in the food and drink industry. She wonders, too, “will the novelty wear off, and will we eventually go back to just sweets?” 
Our products have intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of cannabis infused products. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.
First, use a coffee grinder to turn your herb in to a fine powder. As always, the drier the herb, the better. When the herb is ground up, add it in to the crockpot and add the glycerin. It’s best to use a crockpot that has a “Warm” setting. If the tincture is boiling, more THC will dissipate, creating a lesser effect with the end product. Leave the tincture on warm for 24 hours. Stir it occasionally. You can also test it but BE CAREFUL! Glycerin holds heat in and gets extremely hot! Don’t burn yourself.

By the time you finish mixing together your marijuana/egg/food coloring mix, the ham that’s been cooking should be done. Remember to keep an eye on it while mixing up the eggs as well, to make sure that it doesn’t burn. When the ham has finished cooking to your liking, pour the eggs over the ham in the frying pan. Continue to cook the eggs and ham together until the eggs are scrambled (it shouldn’t take too long). Serve up your green eggs and ham with some toast (preferably with medicated butter or jelly on top!) and enjoy your holiday!


Mary Poppins wasn’t just blowing smoke when she sang, “Just a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.” There’s proof lining the shelves of dispensaries across the country, and the choices in infused edibles have never been better. But for some patients, it’s more complicated than choosing between Dr. Robert’s Chocolate Trip Cookie and Compassion Edibles’ Traditional French Chocolate Tainted Truffles. People with special dietary …
Not to be outdone, Netflix pushed out its own marijuana cooking show this summer: Cooking on High, which pits two chefs against each other to create THC-enhanced dishes for a panel of judges, punctuated by cannabis education from loveable pothead comedian Ngaio Bealum. Though critical reception of the fell flat, some of the chefs and personalities featured within seem destined for another, better executed vehicle for stardom. One standout was Andrea Drummer, whose delectable cod cake sandwich made her the winner of the show’s first episode. Drummer trained at Le Cordon Bleu, and oddly enough used to work as a drug prevention counselor before getting into weed cooking about five years ago.
How to Make Infused Coconut Oil Making cannabis-infused coconut oil is as simple as steeping quality herb in a quality oil. Machines are available to make cannabis-infused coconut oil, but the infusion process can be done right on a stovetop or hot plate with the help of a double boiler. What You Will Need Double boiler (you can make one if you don’t own one) ¼ to ½ ounce of cannabis 1 cup of coconut oil (organic, expeller-pressed works best for this process) 2-3 feet of cooking twine (a clean unused white shoestring will work in a pinch) Cheesecloth (about an 8” x 10” piece) TIP: A ratio of one quarter ounce of cannabis to one cup of oil is a good starting point. If you want a potent oil, high-quality flower (15%+ THC) works well. However, until you become more comfortable with the process or if you have limited funds, using shake, trim and/or kief work fine (avoid stems and seeds). Cooking Directions Prepare the “herb packet”: Lay the cheese cloth out flat Place the cannabis (breaking up larger pieces) into the middle and distribute evenly over a small area (remember the packet needs to fit into the top pan) Fold in opposite ends to cover the herb Now fold in one of the open ends, tuck and roll Tie the roll of herb tightly with cooking twine (tying a knot in one end and then guiding the twine through it works good) Fill the bottom pan of a double boiler with a few inches of water (allowing enough space so that it does not touch the top pan) and set the shallow pan on top. Place over medium heat to a gentle boil - NOT a rolling boil. Add 1 cup of coconut oil to the top pan. When the coconut oil is almost melted, add about 1 cup of water so that the liquid will cover the herb packet [Note: Coconut oil is nonpolar and water is polar so they will naturally separate when chilled; and THC and CBD are not soluble in water, but are in certain carrier oils. Therefore, the coconut oil acts as the carrier and will “soak” up the cannabinoids, leaving any impurities in the water.] Continue heating the oil and water mixture until all of the coconut oil is melted and then add the herb packet - pressing down gently into the liquid using a metal spoon. Cover and leave to cook for 90 minutes, checking back every half hour or so to flip over the packet and stir it around gently. Also, check the water in the bottom pan to make sure it is not boiling too hard and that the water level is still good - be careful to avoid any escaping steam when removing the top pan. After 90 minutes, the oil and water mixture should be a deep green color. At this point, turn off the heat and remove the herb packet and place in a bowl. Squeeze out any oil that is trapped in the “herb packet” by pressing with a spoon (when it cools down, you can give it another squeeze by hand to get every drop). Add this to the liquid mixture and place in the refrigerator to cool. When the mixture is cooled, the water and oil separate (dirty looking water on the bottom and a nice green color solidified oil containing the good stuff on top). Gently poke 2 or 3 holes through the oil, turn over (holding your hand gently over the oil) and drain the water off. If you are not going to use the oil immediately, store in a container (glass preferred) and label with date, strain and ratio. This will help you determine which strains and in what quantities work best for you. The most important thing to remember is that the effects of consuming cannabis-infused coconut oil (directly or as an ingredient in a cooked dish) are usually slow-acting due to the cannabinoids having to be digested first. As such, it may take up to three (3) hours for you to feel its maximum effects, and those effects could last for awhile. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed or concerned about overdosing, don’t panic -- no one has ever died as a direct result of consuming cannabis. Choosing the Right Strain Your next choice will be determining what strain(s) of cannabis to use. The infusion process does not drastically change the effects or flavors of the variety of cannabis used. Therefore, you will want to use a cannabis strain that delivers the desired effects you want to achieve (indica, sativa, hybrid, high-CBD). Most importantly, you want to be sure that the cannabis you use is free from impurities (such as mold, fungus, bugs, and pesticides). If the cannabis is compromised, the infusion process will not correct it. Cooking Temperatures Cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are all affected differently by heat. A double boiler traps steam between the pans (provided you have a good seal) and remains steady about 212° F. The most volatile terpenes will start to evaporate around 70° F (filling the air with a pungent aroma). A majority of the remaining terpenes will begin to evaporate rapidly around 100° F. The boiling points of flavonoids range between 273.2° and 352.4° F, so the dominant flavors of the strain you use should still be evident in the infused oil. Cannabinoids, specifically THC and CBD, exist in acidic and activated forms. In the plant, these cannabinoids exist almost entirely in the acidic form and are known as THCA and CBDA. When heated, these acidic forms undergo a chemical reaction called decarboxylation that results in THCA converting to THC and CBDA converting to CBD. Complete activation occurs when heated to 220° F for 90 minutes. In theory, the double boiler cooks at 212° F, but many factors can change that number, so you may need to experiment by adding or subtracting a few minutes to achieve your desired effects. Remember, if you are going to use the oil in a recipe that will expose it to further heat, you don’t want it to be fully activated at this stage. Further, coconut oil has an average smoking point of 350° F, and can be very tricky to cook on direct heat. A double boiler cooks by steam so the oil doesn’t burn easily. Overcooking the oil compromises the fats and the taste will be most unappealing. If this happens, all you can do is throw it out, wipe the pan clean, and start over. Health Benefits Cannabis and coconut oil are what some would call the perfect pair. Coupling coconut oil, “a vegan-friendly super food,” with cannabis, “nature’s miracle plant,” makes a lot of sense. Coconut oil is a saturated oil made primarily of medium-chain fatty acids. It is safe to ingest in edible form and is easily digested. It gets its extra punch from lauric acid (C12), which comprises about 50% of the total fatty acids, and has been linked to many health benefits: reducing abdominal obesity, accelerating healing time for wounds, delivering antioxidant properties, lowering lipid components (e.g. cholesterol, triglycerides), preventing bone loss and more. Some people even use coconut oil as a daily detox. Saturated fats have gotten a bad rap for decades. They have been accused of contributing to high cholesterol, heart disease, obesity, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Much confusion and contradictory evidence exists on the subject, even among health care professionals. Professionals, like Dr. Aseem Malhotra, are trying to set the record straight. Dr. Malhotra gained attention after the publication of his peer-reviewed editorial in the 2013 British Medical Journal (BMJ), wherein he seriously challenged the conventional view on saturated fats, and found no significant association between saturated fat and cardiovascular risk. Coconut Oil Uses There are so many things you can do with cannabis infused coconut oil including: Drizzle over hot cooked pastas, grains, cereals and vegetables Great for sauces and dressings Add to hot cooked soups and stews Use as a poultry rub Pan fry foods like scrambled egg, fish, bananas, chicken Put a spoonful in your coffee, tea or hot chocolate Add to smoothies Types of Coconut Oil Organic, virgin (or extra-virgin), raw, unrefined, centrifuged and cold-pressed are all terms you want to look for when selecting a coconut oil for ingesting with no cooking or for use in low-heat cooking. These oils typically deliver a strong coconut flavor. Organic, refined, expeller-pressed and solvent-free are the terms you are looking for when selecting an oil for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, especially when using higher temperatures. These refined oils also tend to have a lighter coconut flavor. Virgin Oil: Unrefined / Centrifuged Oil True virgin oil is a centrifuged coconut oil produced without using heat. It is considered one of the highest quality oils, but also one of the most expensive coconut oils on the market today. Terms like raw, pure and unrefined are associated with virgin oils. Virgin coconut oil has a more distinct coconut flavor. It is considered by most to be extremely mild and smooth, and can be eaten right off a spoon. Producing high-quality virgin oil is timely and expensive. Using a machine (centrifuge) cooled by chilled water, coconut cream is produced from pressing the fresh, white meat of the coconut and then concentrating it to yield more and more oil while the proteins and water soluble constituents are separated out and more of the phytonutrients are preserved. Unlike olive oil and some of the other oils, there are no standards to be met in the coconut oil industry to claim extra-virgin status. It is mostly a buzz word used for marketing. Cold-pressed Oils Cold-pressed coconut oils are also often referred to as raw or unrefined. The extraction method used to produce these oils is very similar to the centrifuged method used to make virgin coconut oils. The cold-pressing method however uses a drying process, which can be accomplished using varying degrees of heat. Therefore, very few cold-pressed oils are truly virgin oils. The method of drying and amount of heat used will determine the quality and taste of the coconut oil. Oils processed at high temperatures may taste of toasted coconut, while those processed at lower temperatures tend to deliver more of a mild, raw coconut flavor. If the oil was poorly processed, it may exhibit burnt or rancid qualities. Refined or RBD Coconut Oils Most coconut oils available on the market today are refined or RBD (refined, bleached and deodorized). If a label doesn’t say it is otherwise, then it is most likely refined. These are typically the least expensive of all coconut oils. Refined coconut oil should deliver a light, delicate flavor. The refining process strips away some of the nutrients, but it doesn’t have to alter other attributes of the coconut oil (such as fatty acid profile, taste, aroma). The methods for producing refined oils varies significantly, and can be accomplished with or without harsh solvents (like lye or hexane). If a product doesn’t say it is solvent free, it is a safe bet it was chemically processed and you should avoid it. Otherwise, RBD oils are fine to use, especially for cooking. Bleaching simply refers to the filtering process to remove impurities and is generally not a chemical process. Organic usually signifies that no harsh chemicals or solvents were used in the production. Expeller-pressed Extraction Method The expeller-pressed extraction method is used to produce RBD oils. During production the coconut meat is dried (most often by sun or smoke) and then pressed in large expeller presses. The resulting coconut oil is crude and must be refined or cleaned to minimize free fatty acids, remove remaining moisture, and minimize bad flavors or aromas. Expeller-pressed coconut oils can be a good option if you do not want to pay the premium for virgin oils. They are also a good option for those who do not like the taste of coconuts, or don’t want a strong coconut flavor for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, certain foods. Just be certain that no chemicals or solvents were used in the process. MCT Oil Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are a form of saturated fatty acid that has numerous health benefits. Coconut oil is one great source of MCTs. Roughly 65% of the fatty acids in coconut oil are medium-chain triglycerides. There are four kinds of MCTs: caproic (C6), caprylic (C8), capric (C10) and lauric (C12) acids. Generally speaking, the shorter the chain (meaning the lower the number of carbons the acid has), the faster the body can turn the fatty acids into ketones (usable energy). MCT oil is not an oil found in nature, but is instead manufactured by machine. The fatty acids are extracted through an industrial process of fractionation and concentrated into MCT oil. The logic is that since MCTs are healthy, the more the better. However, lauric acid (C12) is totally void, or present only in minuscule amounts in MCT oil. This has caused much debate on the matter. One side argues that MCT oils don’t include lauric acid because it is rare and more costly to include, and the other side argues that C12 is a less efficient way to obtain energy and adds nothing extra to the product. MCT oil makers advocate using only C8 and C10 (or 100% of one or the other) because they are the most rapidly metabolized for energy. Choosing between coconut oil and MCT oil, or deciding which one is better, should not be a concern when you understand the differences. On one hand, coconut oil is high in lauric acid which has well-documented health benefits, and MCT oil has very little to offer in that way. On the other hand, MCT oil may help raise energy levels better than coconut oil, but little proof is available to validate this claim. If you do plan to use an MCT oil, be sure the label clearly lists the ingredients and discloses how it was produced. Many MCT oils are chemically altered and contain unhealthy fillers like polyunsaturated fats, and due to their refining process may use harsh solvents and chemicals in manufacturing. Storage and Shelf-Life Be sure to keep the infused oil in a container with a tight lid (insects and critters love it). A glass jar with a wide mouth works well so that you can scoop it out easily. The infused oil should be kept out of direct sunlight. It can be refrigerated, but it is not necessary. It can also be frozen, but freezing it will change the taste - sometimes for the better but sometimes for the worse. Coconut oil is very stable and depending on the kind, can last anywhere from 18 months to several years. Opinions differ on how long cannabis-infused oil can be kept. Most agree that degradation begins after 2-3 months, and sooner after repeated exposure to air (opening and shutting the jar) or overexposure to sunlight or heat. This does not mean it is unusable, but you will definitely start to notice a change in the taste and effectiveness as the cannabinoids begin to degrade.
To smoke hash oil with a spliff, add the hash oil when rolling on top of the herbal weed.  This is a good way to add a kick to cheap pot.  It may take some practice to get it smoking properly.  It’s also possible to add on top of the weed in a bowl.  Dab it on to the side of the bowl to avoid it saturating the intake, but not too close to the side as to miss the weed, as pure oil is more likely to catch fire.  You want it between the intake and the bowl edge, on top of the weed.
After assembling your materials, put your cannabis butter on low (REALLY LOW) heat on the stove the melt it. Take half of your Oreos and crush them up with the half of the Heath bars and add them to the butter. Put the other half of the crumbs on the inside of a 9×13 pan. Cover the crumbs as best as you can with the 1/2 gallon of ice cream. Then, take the butter and crumb mix and coat the top of the ice cream. Take your favorite flavor of syrup and cover the top layer. Stick this whole pan in the freezer and let it freeze. After a few hours, you’ll have a dank treat that will get you extremely baked… And taste so good!
Wolf pulled a Mason jar of infused olive oil from a shelf and encouraged me to smell it. It had a powerfully green scent. “Olive oil infuses beautifully,” she said. “It’s very earthy.” A jar of infused canola oil, on the other hand, smelled like bong water. Wolf had used the infused olive oil to make the stuffed mushrooms as well as a spinach tart. Those who wanted even more weed could slather their food with an infused feta sauce made with olive oil, garlic, parsley, and red onion. “Strong flavors help conceal the taste,” Wolf said. “It is a challenge to keep the foods from tasting like cannabis. That’s probably the hardest thing about making edibles.” Dessert was a “mildly infused” strawberry trifle in a big glass bowl. For palate cleansers, there were frozen grapes—an old standby for Wolf. “They’re wonderful when people get stoned,” she explained.

For those who prefer to avoid smoking or vaporizing cannabis, cannabis infused edibles are a great solution. In fact edibles represent one of the fastest growing product categories among medical and recreational dispensaries nationally. Nearly 5 million edible products were sold in Colorado alone in 2014. For those living in less tolerant states, you can make your own edibles at home with surprising ease. In this guide we will cover how to make edibles, how to determine dosage, and why the high associated with edibles feels so strong.
Also, if you do plan on straining the milk, you can save what gets taken out of the mix and dry it. Store this mixture to use in edibles later! It’s always nice to have a recipe that reuses ingredients more than once, making sure to get as much benefit as possible from everything. This milk can also be flavored with all kinds of natural flavors! For this season, cinnamon would be absolutely perfect. Of course, try out a bunch and pick your favorite! Enjoy your healthy, delicious hempseed milk!
CBD and CBDa, among other cannabinoids have been demonstrated to be useful against many skin conditions and pain associated with arthritis, nerve pain, and cancer. To extract the cannabinoids in the High CBD Hash Oil use either edible methodology described above.  You can activate more CBDa to CBD by simmering the solution on the stove for the 30 minutes instead of being cautious not to create bubbles.
Yippy!!! I am new to it but CO2 Hash/Kief is the best thing ever. It took a few hours to process all the shake but I had a lot. I actually used finer micro first 70 micron (high quality), then 90 micron (2nd grade), I stopped there but maybe should have done 120 for cooking purposes. The trim was a bit on the drier side and was blended in a blender first. If you can imagine I had family growing organic medicine then throwing away the trim for five years before I stopped them!
Ratios and amounts are a personal thing. The recipes on this site use 1/2 ounce per cup of butter, for myself i usually use double that amount. Take my free dosing class to learn more at http://www.Cannademy.com. I am not a fan of the Magical Butter Machine and do not recommend it as I do not recommend finely grinding your plant material and machine forces you to do that.
Edibles are yummy treats infused with marijuana that deliver the medicinal and psychoactive ingredients to your system without having to smoke. They are a fun, convenient and covert way to consume cannabis, whether for recreation or medical purposes. The cannabis cookbooks in this list have tons of recipes to help you make the most delicious sweet or savory Mary Jane treats.

Cannabis-infused salves and topicals deliver quick pain relief and a feeling of relaxation to your muscles, without any psychoactive effects. Coconut oil infusions are a good choice for creating your own pain salves because coconut oil is a great transporter of CBD from your skin into your body’s cannabinoid receptors. Better CBD absorption means more relief for sore muscles, arthritis, and other localized pains. It also becomes as easy as adding your infused coconut oil into a non-cannabis product you already own and love!
Marijuana butter and cannabis-infused oil can be ingested in a variety of ways. Once you’ve created the product, it can be used as a cooking ingredient for any recipe—minding that most baked goods work best with butter. However, one thing to consider is the temperature of the dish you’re preparing—heating the marijuana butter or oil to temperatures exceeding 245 degrees Fahrenheit will burn the THC. For a more simple application, the butter can be used as a spread on toast or even just dosed orally by itself. Some choose cannabis-infused oil as a medicinal ingredient in topical salves, lotions, and ointment, as it can be absorbed through the skin once it has gone through the decarboxylation process.
Learn how to get baked with a delicious taste; Cannabutter is just the start. This cannabis cookbook will teach you the ins and outs of cannabis-infused cooking and guide you step by step on your journey to become the guy or girl that others come to for their edibles. In this book you’ll find 40 recipes for delicious edibles and cannabis infused meals to make from the comfort of your own kitchen.
High Times Magazine is well known and definitely well loved by marijuana aficionados all over the globe. They have been reporting on cannabis culture for decades, and have become the world leader in cannabis entertainment. They even have their famous Cannabis World Cup each year, which draws thousands of enthusiasts to sample different strains and celebrate cannabis in all of its different forms.

This first-ever cookbook from High Times magazine—the world's most trusted name when it comes to getting stoned—is the deliciously definitive guide to cannabis-infused cooking. Easy, accessible recipes and advice demystify the experience of cooking with grass and offer a cornucopia of irie appetizers and entrees, stoner sweets, cannabis cocktails, and high-holiday feasts for any occasion, from Time Warp Tamales and Sativa Shrimp Spring Rolls to Pico de Ganja Nachos and Pineapple Express Upside-Down Cake. Delectable color photos and recipes inspired by stoner celebrities such as Snoop Dogg, Cheech and Chong, and Willie Nelson will spark the interest of experienced cannabis cooks and "budding" chefs, whether they're looking for the perfect midnight munchie or just to take dinner to a higher level.
Pros: Edibles have demonstrated the longest-duration medicinal effect of any method of medication. Also, the total amounts of cannabinoids available through eating are multiplied and could have a much stronger effect than smoking. Coconut oil can be mixed with any foods to keep medication very discrete. Butter can also be used but use unsalted as it will separate. There are hundreds of recipes to meet dietary needs and taste pallets.
I have an ardent lift (for decarboxalation) I feel as if it over does it? It runs for about 2 hours, and claims that it’s a perfect decarb everytime. 2 hours seems a bit long. Also when I have used trim, I notice the thc % is a little bit too low. Or has at times tested at 0% (using the tcheck device) I am aware that flower bears much stronger results. .should I stick to flower for streng?
Substitute your marijuana flour for a portion of your recipe's requirement. Generally you are looking at about a 10% substitution but as much as 20% may be ok.[15] This is especially true for baked good that must rise such as breads. Unlike using infused butter or oil, marijuana flour is a true substitution. Marijuana flour doesn't act quite the same as regular flour.

Oregon, where Wolf lives, legalized recreational marijuana in 2014. Four more states followed suit in last fall’s election: California, Massachusetts, Nevada, and Maine. More than twenty per cent of Americans now live in states where recreational weed is legal. President Trump’s appointee for Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, is an opponent of marijuana and is widely seen as a threat to the industry. But over the long term, proponents argue, the country is on a path toward legalization. (Last week, Canada’s Prime Minister unveiled a bill, which is expected to pass, legalizing recreational marijuana in that country.) Amy Margolis, Wolf’s lawyer and one of Oregon’s most prominent cannabis advocates, said, “I think we’re seeing an extremely rapid sea change in the way people perceive the safety of cannabis use and the legalization process. There are other issues that have followed the same trajectory, like gay rights—all of a sudden you see the switch flip.”
Anytime. Glycerin is tougher than alcohol to get a strong tincture as it is just not as efficient as extracting. I am going to be working on glycerin tincture instructions to update my cooking course after we launch the new topicals course. Depending on your needs and tolerance level, you may do fine, just be aware it likely won’t be as strong as the same tincture made with alcohol.
It’s clear that if you cook your weed, you get a longer, stronger, and more legal experience than smoking marijuana but there are a few cons. The most obvious is that you don’t get as acutely high from pot edibles as you do from smoking marijuana. The second con is that dosing is much easier smoking weed than it is with edibles. Overdosing on edibles can produce a frightening experience but is usually not physically dangerous. The third con is simply that it takes about an hour to feel effects of edibles.
In addition to pain salves and balms, cannabis coconut oil is a great addition to almost any skincare routine. Mixed with aloe vera and vitamin E, it makes a great lotion for everyday use or for healing sunburns. Some skincare gurus swear by cannabis coconut oil as a facial moisturizer, claiming that with regular use, you’ll get a glowy complexion and see the anti-aging effects of cannabis.
Preheat your oven to 370 degrees. Put your canna butter in a large mixing bowl and mix in your vanilla extract and sugar. Use another bowl and mix your flour, salt, and baking soda. Stir in your eggs, brown sugar, chips, and all other ingredients, mixing in just enough water to make a hard semi-solid. Now stir in your canna butter and size your cookies by how much weed you used. If you used a half ounce, make at least 14 cookies. Each cookie will be equal to one large bowl of smoked marijuana. Remember effects take at least an hour, so don’t eat too many cookies but enjoy just one cookie or a half and you will get amazing results.

I have made cannabis-infused butter many times with inconsistent results. I always start with a ration of 454g of unsalted butter and 28 grams of cannabis. I boil 6 cups of water or so then add the butter and the ground cannabis (i grind it by hand using a manual grinder) and reduce heat, letting it simmer for 3-5 hours. Strain through a cheese cloth and let cool over night.
Cannabis oil extracted via heat and pressure can be used in topicals or ingested by itself orally, but the taste and consistency leave a lot to be desired. The most common way to consume cannabis oil, also known as “concentrate” or “dab,” is by vaporizing or smoking it, but it can also act as an ingredient for an easier method of making weed butter. By simply melting the dab with some butter or oil at a low temperature, mixing them into one substance, you’ve made marijuana butter! Keep in mind, however, that cannabis oil needs to adhere to the same temperature cap of 245 degrees Fahrenheit to minimize the destruction of the THC. One downside to cooking with butter derived from cannabis oil versus marijuana is the stickiness of the product—certain types of oil can leave behind a difficult residue on cookware. (For those reading this tip too late, try rescuing your pan with 99% isopropyl alcohol! It’s super effective.)
Yep, you got it! The only difference for me when making topicals is I decarb some of it and leave some undecarbed so I get full spectrum (both THC-A and CBD-A along with THC and CBD). This is optional, but I find it makes the most effective topicals. I am currently at work on a new online course about making cannabis topicals, but you are definitely on the right track.
For decarbing I would not recommend a large skillet like that as I doubt the temperature is consistent throughout and it is not meant for baking – you would have a hot spot under the dish, it might work, but I can’t see it’s your best option. I think a small well made toaster oven, with oven thermometer would be a better choice for someone on a budget.
Hi, Congratulations on making your first batch! The short answer is yes, you need a double boiler. I will tell you that coconut oil on the double boiler is not the simplest method. It does require you to watch the infusion that it does not get too hot or too thick, as moisture will escape during the process, thickening your infusion. Also be certain to not let the water boil off in the bottom vessel. A candy thermometer will definitely come in handy to ensure your infusion temps stay below 180 degrees (I like 140 or so). Personally, I recommend using a crock pot or slow cooker. You don’t have to watch it all the time like you do with a double boiler and you can be sure your temps will not get too high. I go over both these methods in detail in my Cannabis Cooking For Home Cooks course. You should check it out.
Substitute your marijuana infused butter for regular butter.[9] Unlike with oils, most recipes use small amounts of butter for flavor. You can substitute the entire recipe amount with marijuana butter. If you find that you are not getting the needed medicinal effect, consider increasing the amount of marijuana per stick of butter to a half an ounce. Alternately, you can use a different method of cooking with marijuana.
There is no easier way to ingest too much marijuana than by eating it. Sometimes people are impatient and think “it’s not working” and eat more. By the time it all kicks in they have overdone it. While “overdoses” are not dangerous in that they are never fatal, they won’t shut down your organs, they can make you feel anxious, paranoid, and/or disoriented. Dosing edibles is somewhat of an art, a lot of factors need to be taken into consideration and people’s tolerances run a wide range. An amount that one person does not even physically feel might be enough to make someone else experience couch-lock for hours. When cooking with marijuana, especially new plant material you are not familiar with, it’s a good idea to vape or smoke a little to get general idea of its potency.  Keep in mind that cooking can intensify potency somewhat. If you do find a batch of your edibles is more potent than you intended the remedy is easy – eat less! Learn more about dosing when cooking with marijuana at this link.
Published in 2015 by a Colorado writer and photographer, this cookbook collects recipes from a dozen chefs and one bartender who specialize in cannabis-infused food. Before the recipes, there’s a 100-plus-page section that provides biographies of the chefs and discusses many aspects of buying, identifying and cooking with cannabis, covering cooking cultivars, details on infusions and extractions, plus dosing tips. There’s a longer section on how to make the oils and butters and tinctures than in many books; it also includes recipes for infused milk, cream, honey and simple syrup, all of which makes the recipes that follow succinct. The dosage per serving is clearly stated, and the recipe headnotes often include nicely geeky bits, such as how mangoes are reputed to heighten the effects of cannabis because they’re high (ha-ha) in myrcene molecules. Thus a recipe for rice pudding with green cardamom, mango and pistachios.
Mary only recently told her family in Oklahoma about the new turn in her career. “I was so nervous,” she said. “I felt like I was coming out to them.” She was surprised to learn that they were curious about the medical uses of cannabis. One relative, who has chronic pain, started taking a Laurie & MaryJane brownie instead of painkillers to help him sleep. (He got his doctor’s approval.) Another uses their infused coconut oil to treat his aging dog’s epilepsy. (He mixes it with dog food.)
You can combine the amount of tablespoons of infused-coconut oil you wish to consume based on the above formula with plain coconut oil to fill out any recipe that calls for oil. Brownies are easy because they usually call for 1/3 cup oil and may be divided and stored for later consumption. The above recipe of 1/3 cup infused-oil into 12 brownies would yield about 83mg cannabinoids per brownie.
First, take the three peppers and cut them in to strips, about 1/2 inch wide and the proceed to chop the onion in to small pieces. Put all of the veggies (and meats if you so choose) in to a skillet and add in your Cannabutter. You can replace the butter with cannabis infused olive oil, as well, if you want to be a little more health conscious. Sauté everything until cooked well and then serve the mix over rice or noodles or alone if you’d like. As for the leftover oil in the pan, you can pour it over the rice/veggie/meat mix to ensure that you get the most out of your meal! Enjoy your medicated stir fry!
Published in 2015 by a Colorado writer and photographer, this cookbook collects recipes from a dozen chefs and one bartender who specialize in cannabis-infused food. Before the recipes, there’s a 100-plus-page section that provides biographies of the chefs and discusses many aspects of buying, identifying and cooking with cannabis, covering cooking cultivars, details on infusions and extractions, plus dosing tips. There’s a longer section on how to make the oils and butters and tinctures than in many books; it also includes recipes for infused milk, cream, honey and simple syrup, all of which makes the recipes that follow succinct. The dosage per serving is clearly stated, and the recipe headnotes often include nicely geeky bits, such as how mangoes are reputed to heighten the effects of cannabis because they’re high (ha-ha) in myrcene molecules. Thus a recipe for rice pudding with green cardamom, mango and pistachios.
Edibles are steadily gaining popularity in North America but are currently illegal for purchase or distribution here in Canada. Until the government adds edibles to the list of what can be sold, making your own is a simple and legal option. Edibles are foods that incorporate cannabis through cooking or baking and can be made at home through a variety of methods, including using traditional dried flower, our Maker’s Mix products or the Emblem Cannabis Oils.
Before learning about ways to make marijuana your go-to herb in the kitchen, find out whether it’s legal in the state you’re in. Currently, medical marijuana is legal in 30 states and Washington, D.C., while eight states and the District of Columbia have legalized it for recreational use. Thirteen states, however, have decriminalization laws in effect, so make sure to know what the legalities are where you live first.
You sound biter about the taste of weed. If done without any care, yeah it taste like shit but weed can add some awesome flavor if done correctly. I made a lemon meringue pie with cannabis once and the flower really made it something special. No ass taste, just good lemon flavor complemented by the weed. too much weed and it starts to taste funny like you said but just the right amount is great. Too much of a good thing is never good.
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